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  1. #1
    One knee is enough SchreiberBike's Avatar
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    Mar 2004
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    What parts of frame to keep?

    I recently cut up my old steel frame which Iíve had since 1979. This was my primary bike for many years and was a beater/winter bike for a while, then it became my one legged fixer. It had lots of rust, so I didnít want to sell it or give it away.

    It was interesting to cut up and I learned a bit about industrial-steel bike making in the process.

    Iím curious what parts people think would be good to keep as souvenirs. As Iíve cut the bike up and held the bits in my hand, some parts just seem to have more significance (power?) than others.

    Tell me what you think.

    Thanks
    "The more you tighten your grip . . . the more star systems will slip through your fingers."

  2. #2
    eert a ekil yzarc SpiderMike's Avatar
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    Oct 2000
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    Keep the rear triangle. put a seat post, and soft seat, and you have a chair.

  3. #3
    cab horn
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    Jun 2004
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    I'd keep the entire frame.

  4. #4
    One knee is enough SchreiberBike's Avatar
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    Mar 2004
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    1978 Fuji - now fixed and pegged. 1980s Cannondale Touring - pegged with 18 speeds. 2001 Cannondale CADD 3 - not being ridden
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    It's a fun if macabre project.

    I kept the right rear dropout and most of the downtube. The right rear dropout just seemed like the point where I had poured years and years and miles and miles of energy through. It also has a pleasant heft, and after some time with a grinder and a file, nice smooth edges.

    The downtube has the brand name and looks good hanging on the wall near my desk.

    I tried making a flute out of the top tube, but I learned that there's a lot more to making a flute than drilling some holes. It does make some nice tones, but they don't relate to each other in any way.
    "The more you tighten your grip . . . the more star systems will slip through your fingers."

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