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  1. #1
    Da Big Kahuna
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    What to carry on a century ride

    I figure:

    Two water bottles

    Two spare tubes and irons (and a frame pump)

    The items above are on the bike. Those below would be in my bike jersey:

    A few gel packs and power bar (more will be supplied on route so this is just insurance).

    Cell phone

    A little money

    Maybe a couple of those moist towelettes that are individually wrapped.

    Anything missing - or anything unnecessary?

    Bob

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    Banned Bikepacker67's Avatar
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    Depends upon when/where you're doing your century.

    If ya do the Quabbin century in July with two water bottles (and "lettuce" but no food) you're gonna be hurtin' somewhere north of New Salem.

    Little towns with limited "service" separated by 10-15 miles and 5-15% up and down and up and down grades....

  3. #3
    Long Distance Cyclist Machka's Avatar
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    For ALL my long rides, I divide the stuff I carry into the following categories. I find that dividing everything into these categories helps me to remember everything:

    1. Bicycle - including the bicycle, of course, waterbottles, racks, fenders, handlebar bag, seat pack, etc. ... and any maintenance that the bicycle might need to be in road-worthy condition (i.e. new tires)

    2. Tools - tire changing stuff (tubes, levers, patches, folding tire, boots, pump), multitool, electrical tape, zip ties, etc.

    3. Medical - painkillers, wetwipes, sunscreen, etc.

    4. Clothing - raingear, cold weather gear, reflective gear, etc.

    5. Nutrition - energy bars, gels etc.

    6. Personal - ID, cell phone, money, etc.

    and then for touring-type rides I add a seventh category:

    7. Camping - tent, sleeping pad, sleeping bag, cookware, etc.


    For a shortish ride, like a century, I won't carry as much stuff ... for a longer ride, like a brevet, I'll carry more ... but everything I carry falls into those categories.


    Also remember, while you are on the century:

    Liquid - drink one 750 ml (3 cups) bottle of water and/or sports drink every 1 to 1.5 hours

    Food - eat approx. 250 calories per hour


    All the best!

  4. #4
    Infamous Member chipcom's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by TheRCF
    I figure:

    Two water bottles

    Two spare tubes and irons (and a frame pump)

    The items above are on the bike. Those below would be in my bike jersey:

    A few gel packs and power bar (more will be supplied on route so this is just insurance).

    Cell phone

    A little money

    Maybe a couple of those moist towelettes that are individually wrapped.

    Anything missing - or anything unnecessary?

    Bob

    You might consider a multi-tool and some duct tape, just in case you need to patch your tire in addition to replacing the tube. (Dollar bill has been known to work in a pinch, section of an old tire is best).

    You riding on Oahu? I'd say rain jacket...but what's the point, you're gonna be wet anyway. ;-) Spare socks are nice though. (I spent 10 years in the USMC, we take spare socks everywhere!) Basic first aid kit...including some surgical gloves (great for keeping your hands semi clean if you have to do repairs).

    Otherwise, depends on how supported the ride is. SAG? Rest stops w/ food and drink? For a supported century you are fine, for unsupported or solos, I'd bring more munchies, a third water bottle, a map and a plan for possible water/rest stops.

    I tend to plan and load up for the worst..my motto is to plan for Murphy's Law.
    "Let us hope our weapons are never needed --but do not forget what the common people knew when they demanded the Bill of Rights: An armed citizenry is the first defense, the best defense, and the final defense against tyranny. If guns are outlawed, only the government will have guns. Only the police, the secret police, the military, the hired servants of our rulers. Only the government -- and a few outlaws. I intend to be among the outlaws" - Edward Abbey

  5. #5
    Proud To Be An American EXCALIBUR's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by TheRCF
    I figure:

    Two water bottles

    Two spare tubes and irons (and a frame pump)

    The items above are on the bike. Those below would be in my bike jersey:

    A few gel packs and power bar (more will be supplied on route so this is just insurance).

    Cell phone

    A little money

    Maybe a couple of those moist towelettes that are individually wrapped.

    Anything missing - or anything unnecessary?

    Bob
    Sounds like you're preparing for the Honolulu Century Ride 2005 tomorrow. I'll see you on the road. Ride safe.
    EXCALIBUR
    2004 Giant Cypress SX 2006 Giant OCR 3

  6. #6
    Da Big Kahuna
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    Guess I better elaborate - this is an organized ride. Someone told me there are food/water/first aid stops about 15 miles apart. Also, since it is on Oahu, Hawaii, even if there were not all those things, there are lots of parks, usually with water fountains, so at least water would not usually be a problem.

    There will also be SAG vehicles.

    Don't know how far I'll ride, though I'm setting out with the idea I may do the whole century. Biggest drawback is that most of my riding has been before dawn so this is going to be hotter. On the other hand, I'll be able to draft sometimes - which I almost never get to do on normal rides and never as part of a group. I'm lucky to get one rider in front of me!

    This is kinda a last minute thing. I was emailing a rider I sometimes catch on the road about maybe riding Saturday, but for sure Sunday - and he said I should just go on the century ride, so I am.

    I did 42 miles on Friday (28 miles before stopping for breakfast) and a couple weeks ago I did about 57 (43 before stopping to eat) so I figure doing at least 50 miles of the century shouldn't be an issue, even if it is hotter.

    I do have to change my routine some though. I mean, normally I set out by 3:00 AM, get back to where I eat between 5:00-5:45, eat at 7:00, and am doing the last 14 miles or so home around 7:30.

    But since this ride starts much later, I have to eat at least something for breakfast before I start. Hope that doesn't screw up my system!

    Supposedly the weather is supposed to be pretty good as far as rain goes, but in Hawaii, no matter what the forecase, you can always have a shower. In fact, the internet weather I usually use, which gives forecasts divided for each hour, if it says zero chance of rain in the early morning when I ride, it ALWAYS rains a little.

    Excalibur - good chance you'll be the guy PASSING me on the road, unless you happen to start out ahead of me! I've done solo centuries before (twice), but took a lot of time to do it, especially a long break for lunch. If I do the full century this time, it will be the first time without a long break.

  7. #7
    totally louche Bekologist's Avatar
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    I always bring a few salt tabs in a glassine bag along with a sampling of the stuff mentioned above. Don't stop hydrating, if you notice you haven't taken a drink in a while, it's been too long.

  8. #8
    Proud To Be An American EXCALIBUR's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by TheRCF
    Excalibur - good chance you'll be the guy PASSING me on the road, unless you happen to start out ahead of me! I've done solo centuries before (twice), but took a lot of time to do it, especially a long break for lunch. If I do the full century this time, it will be the first time without a long break.
    It was a nice day in Hawaii, and a great ride. I just got back and enjoyed seeing all the riders on the road with police controlling traffic at the intersections for the benefit of the riders. As you know, there was a big contingent of 1,400+ from Japan. I hope you had a great ride also.

    Check this out: Something Funny Happened To Me On The Way To The Century Ride
    Last edited by EXCALIBUR; 09-25-05 at 08:45 PM.
    EXCALIBUR
    2004 Giant Cypress SX 2006 Giant OCR 3

  9. #9
    Da Big Kahuna
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    Quote Originally Posted by EXCALIBUR
    It was a nice day in Hawaii, and a great ride. I just got back and enjoyed seeing all the riders on the road with police controlling traffic at the intersections for the benefit of the riders. As you know, there was a big contingent of 1,400+ from Japan. I hope you had a great ride also.
    I have some questions for you, assuming you have done this ride before (its my first time and my first group ride). Other questions many people may have answers for, so read on.

    I did the whole century. Did pretty well, I guess, for me anyway. First half was pretty good. My average speed was 15.6 mph - best ever for that distance (old record was 15.0, but that was by myself). On the other hand, I lost speed every time I stopped at an aid station for food and water - having to walk the bike a fair distance in and out took its toll, plus we started slow with the large mass of riders - I was constantly having to touch the brakes to keep from getting too close to people - and I was just trying to keep a steady cruise, not push hard. So maybe all that balances out.

    Coming back, the sun came out, besides being hotter, you know how tough that Hawaiian sun is when it is right on you. You can just sit in the sun and sweat, but even getting in the shadow of a telephone pole make a big difference. Well, just before I hit 60 miles, I started having trouble - and maybe people have suggestions:

    First my right calf muscle started trying to cramp up so a lot of my focus was spent trying to keep it relaxed.

    Shortly afterwards, after stopping at the aid station at 60 miles, that calf seemed better (not right - just better), but the left calf started doing the same thing.

    Also, sometime around then, maybe a little before, my right tricep got really sore. It has always done this on long rides. Used to be around 35-40 miles. Took longer this time. This was, overall, my biggest problem. That think REALLY HURT and I still had 40 miles to go! It did not go away no matter what I did until I got to relax at home.

    Just over a mile from the end, the muscle in my left upper leg suddenly started trying to cramp up - bad enough that I quickly pulled over and massaged it some. I finished the last part of the ride trying to keep three muscle groups from cramping up, plus was in a lot of pain in my tricep.

    SO, MY BIGGEST QUESTION: What do I need to do to minimize those leg muscles cramping? I did make it a point to eat bananas at the aid stations, which I thought were supposed to help.

    SECOND QUESTION is whether there is something I can do about the tricep. It's always the right side, never the left.

    Oh, my final average speed was 14.4. My fastest century before (of two) was 11.9, solo, but with no walking the bike, or being slowed down by the mob - but with some pretty long rest stops.

    As for the race itself, if you have done it before, I was wondering how this year compared, especially based on the following facts:

    No wind to start and even as winds increased a little later, they really weren't trade winds. Of course, less wind in your face is a plus on most rides, especially when I usually ride before sunrise. But no tradewinds means it is hotter AND more humid. Add the sun beating right on you when the clouds went away, and it just drained me. Heck, that sun can drain you just walking around casually or even sitting in it!

    So, if you have done this before, would you prefer some more wind rather than the higher temp and humitidy?

    On, if you did the full century, what mileage did your computer show? Mine only showed 96 miles (didn't matter as I did some extra riding to and from the bus stop which more than compensated), but I'm wondering if my computer is off or the route was off. A 4% error is pretty big. Actually, it would be more since, in my opinion, using the aid stations should not count in the distance.

  10. #10
    Infamous Member chipcom's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by TheRCF
    SO, MY BIGGEST QUESTION: What do I need to do to minimize those leg muscles cramping? I did make it a point to eat bananas at the aid stations, which I thought were supposed to help.
    Cramping can be a sign of dehydration. Drink more fluids more often. You also need to replenish minerals like sodium, so a sports drink like gatorade, et. al, may help more than plain water. I usually carry a bottle of iced tea (not into sports drinks myself, iced tea tastes so much better when warm!) and a bottle of water. Eating is also important. Banannas, cantalope, grapes, peanuts, granola, cookies and pastries are my favorites.
    "Let us hope our weapons are never needed --but do not forget what the common people knew when they demanded the Bill of Rights: An armed citizenry is the first defense, the best defense, and the final defense against tyranny. If guns are outlawed, only the government will have guns. Only the police, the secret police, the military, the hired servants of our rulers. Only the government -- and a few outlaws. I intend to be among the outlaws" - Edward Abbey

  11. #11
    Da Big Kahuna
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    Quote Originally Posted by chipcom
    Cramping can be a sign of dehydration. Drink more fluids more often. You also need to replenish minerals like sodium, so a sports drink like gatorade, et. al, may help more than plain water. I usually carry a bottle of iced tea (not into sports drinks myself, iced tea tastes so much better when warm!) and a bottle of water. Eating is also important. Banannas, cantalope, grapes, peanuts, granola, cookies and pastries are my favorites.
    That could be it. On normal rides, I don't normally drink much - sometimes nothing - even though I may do 25, 35, or even a bit more before breakfast and I feel fine. OF course, this is all before sunrise. There is a spot I sometimes stop at (outside water fountain).

    I drank what seemed to me quite a bit at the aid stations and some from my bottle in between, but I suspect that maybe I'm not drinking as much as others. Trouble is, what I did drink generally made me feel a little bloated. So either I would have a hard time drinking more or I need to space it out better.

    Thanks.

    Bob

  12. #12
    Senior Member DannoXYZ's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by TheRCF
    That could be it. On normal rides, I don't normally drink much - sometimes nothing - even though I may do 25, 35, or even a bit more before breakfast and I feel fine. OF course, this is all before sunrise. There is a spot I sometimes stop at (outside water fountain).

    I drank what seemed to me quite a bit at the aid stations and some from my bottle in between, but I suspect that maybe I'm not drinking as much as others. Trouble is, what I did drink generally made me feel a little bloated. So either I would have a hard time drinking more or I need to space it out better.

    Thanks.

    Bob
    Well, the 25-35mile ride, you may get away with little water because you're on the verge of dehydration when you're done. You CANNOT assume that you finished in the same condition you started.

    With rides longer than that, from mile-35+ the dehydration will get worse and worse, leading to heat-exhaustion or potentially lethal heat-stroke. What you want to do is get use to drinking small amounts often. Take 2-3 gulps from a water-bottle every 10-minutes. Drink about 2 small water-bottles every hour and you should be fine. Start drinking immediately at the beginning of a ride, DO NOT wait until you feel thirsty, it'll be way too late by that point.

  13. #13
    Proud To Be An American EXCALIBUR's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by TheRCF
    I have some questions for you, assuming you have done this ride before (its my first time and my first group ride). Other questions many people may have answers for, so read on.

    I did the whole century. Did pretty well, I guess, for me anyway. First half was pretty good. My average speed was 15.6 mph - best ever for that distance (old record was 15.0, but that was by myself). On the other hand, I lost speed every time I stopped at an aid station for food and water - having to walk the bike a fair distance in and out took its toll, plus we started slow with the large mass of riders - I was constantly having to touch the brakes to keep from getting too close to people - and I was just trying to keep a steady cruise, not push hard. So maybe all that balances out.

    Coming back, the sun came out, besides being hotter, you know how tough that Hawaiian sun is when it is right on you. You can just sit in the sun and sweat, but even getting in the shadow of a telephone pole make a big difference. Well, just before I hit 60 miles, I started having trouble - and maybe people have suggestions:

    First my right calf muscle started trying to cramp up so a lot of my focus was spent trying to keep it relaxed.

    Shortly afterwards, after stopping at the aid station at 60 miles, that calf seemed better (not right - just better), but the left calf started doing the same thing.

    Also, sometime around then, maybe a little before, my right tricep got really sore. It has always done this on long rides. Used to be around 35-40 miles. Took longer this time. This was, overall, my biggest problem. That think REALLY HURT and I still had 40 miles to go! It did not go away no matter what I did until I got to relax at home.

    Just over a mile from the end, the muscle in my left upper leg suddenly started trying to cramp up - bad enough that I quickly pulled over and massaged it some. I finished the last part of the ride trying to keep three muscle groups from cramping up, plus was in a lot of pain in my tricep.

    SO, MY BIGGEST QUESTION: What do I need to do to minimize those leg muscles cramping? I did make it a point to eat bananas at the aid stations, which I thought were supposed to help.

    SECOND QUESTION is whether there is something I can do about the tricep. It's always the right side, never the left.

    Oh, my final average speed was 14.4. My fastest century before (of two) was 11.9, solo, but with no walking the bike, or being slowed down by the mob - but with some pretty long rest stops.

    As for the race itself, if you have done it before, I was wondering how this year compared, especially based on the following facts:

    No wind to start and even as winds increased a little later, they really weren't trade winds. Of course, less wind in your face is a plus on most rides, especially when I usually ride before sunrise. But no tradewinds means it is hotter AND more humid. Add the sun beating right on you when the clouds went away, and it just drained me. Heck, that sun can drain you just walking around casually or even sitting in it!

    So, if you have done this before, would you prefer some more wind rather than the higher temp and humitidy?

    On, if you did the full century, what mileage did your computer show? Mine only showed 96 miles (didn't matter as I did some extra riding to and from the bus stop which more than compensated), but I'm wondering if my computer is off or the route was off. A 4% error is pretty big. Actually, it would be more since, in my opinion, using the aid stations should not count in the distance.
    I have done the full Century ride many times before. In my racing days, my best finish was 4 hours and 27 minutes. That works out to about 22 mph. Those were the days when we actually raced the Century ride, although it is billed as a *ride.* We had the benefit of drafting in a paceline, echelons, etc. Ahhhh, but that was then, and this is now. These days, I am a recreational rider and still enjoy the event. Remember, although the ride started at 6:15 AM, and it was cool, the Hawaiian sun quickly heated things up. Toss in the humidity, and you have an easy recipe for cramping due to dehydration. It's just so hard to take in enough fluids. I had to force myself to drink water. You will die of dehydration before you die of hunger. The trick when riding in Hawaii's climate is to take in massive amounts of fluids. No tradewinds today made for easier going since there were no headwinds to buck. Kalanianaole Hwy. was smooth sailing in both directions. However, the lack of tradewinds added to the increased humidity, which therefore compounded your cramping due to dehydration. Just remember the reasons we ride in the first place...fun and excercise. Just drink more fluids and keep on keepin' on. You'll do fine. And, be on the lookout for a hysterical lady driving an old Mazda RX-7. She'll try to run you into the sidewalk everytime.
    Last edited by EXCALIBUR; 09-26-05 at 04:35 AM.
    EXCALIBUR
    2004 Giant Cypress SX 2006 Giant OCR 3

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