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Old 09-27-05, 06:07 PM   #1
Sir Lunch-a-lot
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Difference between a Regular Bike and a Road bike

I phoned up a sports shop inquiring about pedals, and said that I had a roadbike. He immediatly said that he did not have pedals for that kind of bike. However, that got me thinking, is my bike really a roadbike? The main reason I said mine is a roadbike is the thinner tires, as well as the fact that I do much of my riding on the highway. So, what actually constitutes a roadbike?
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Old 09-27-05, 06:11 PM   #2
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how about a clue, your bike make and model?
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Old 09-27-05, 06:18 PM   #3
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Nishiki CA04581

Thats the only number I can find on the frame.


But I am mainly wondering what the characteristics of a roadbike are?
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Old 09-27-05, 06:27 PM   #4
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The problem is there is no clear definition. There is more a bike continum:

performance road bike - sport touring road bike - touring bike - hybrid bike - mtn bike - cyclocross bike - comfort bike - classic street bike - chopper bike

I couldn't find any description of your bike with a google. If you have a photo or can describe what it has, we could help more.

One way people tell what type bike they have is to weight it. Road bikes are always less than 35 lbs.

Typical road bike:
-- smooth, thin tires [ 700x23..700x25 ]
-- drop handlebars
-- rarely have disc brakes
-- shorter wheelbase
-- geometry for riding in drops
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Old 09-27-05, 06:34 PM   #5
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It seems like the guy at the sporting goods store knew absolutely nothing about bikes. But also you should have followed up and asked him what kind of pedals they had.... Were you looking for general purpose platform pedals?
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Old 09-27-05, 09:13 PM   #6
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I was just looking for high quality pedals that would survive under my use. But anyway, maybe the guy at the store just had some incorrect misconceptions about what road bicycles are. Maybe he was thinking I had a motorbike?

As for what I have on it... well, its got your standard deraileur unit, I think 12 speeds, level handle bar (none of that dipping you find on race bikes), 27" wheels (if I am not mistaken), a gel touring saddle (I'm still making up my mind as to weather I like this saddle, or the old 30 year old touring saddle). So, I guess as far as I can make out, perhaps its not any one specific type/class of bike. Anyway, thanks for the answers guys.
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Old 09-27-05, 09:25 PM   #7
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Sir Lunch-a-lot
I was just looking for high quality pedals that would survive under my use.
--- For what it's worth, here is a thread I posted in the Fifty Plus forum entitled "How I Cured Leg Cramps" that talks about pedals:
I had been bothered by leg cramps after my commutes and finally tracked down the cause. It was the cheap brands of platform pedals I was using. I have trashed two pairs of platform pedals in the past five years. The cheap ones are not rigid enough; they flex under pressure. This flexing causes strains in the ankle and leg muscles which have a cumulative effect over time and cause leg cramps.
On the advice of my LBS, I finally bought some Redline Alloy Platform Pedals which are a solid one-piece construction plus they're wider and provide a solid foundation for my feet. The leg cramps have totally disappeared since I installed the Redlines on my bicycle.
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Old 09-28-05, 04:10 AM   #8
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Maybe the shop guy though you were after road racing clipless pedals, the one-sided variety. If you have std cranks you can fit any type of pedal, road clipless, MTB clipless, platform, track whatever.
I like MKS pedals, they come in a nice variety of types from platform to cage and are strong, well built and good value. I tend to bash pedals before I wear them out so high end ones such as Specialities TA are a waste of money.
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Old 09-28-05, 06:19 AM   #9
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Well, I guess you could say a bicycle is a bicycle is a bicycle, just as a dog is a dog or a sandwich is a sandwich. The devil is in the details.

When a bicycle is designed and has components reaching for light-weight even at the sacrifice of strength, it is heading toward "road bike" classification. When a bicycle is designed ergonomically and structurally that makes it suitable mainly for on-road use, then it is heading toward the classification of "road bike"

If I saw a bike that had bigger diameter, thin wheels and drop handlebars, I would call it a road bike no matter what the frame or other components. Once you put the skinny wheels on, it just about gets knocked out of the MTB or other catagories.
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