Advertise on Bikeforums.net



User Tag List

Results 1 to 6 of 6
  1. #1
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Posts
    7
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Fixing Flats Speech

    For english class, we have to write and orate an informational (how to) speech. I am going to do mine on fixing a flat. Could you guys edit what I have so far and make nay corrections you see fit. Keep in mind that I will be talking in front of 9th graders in high school.

    ------------------------------------------------------------------------

    Did you know that more than seventy percent of people who ride bikes do not know how to repair a puncture in a tire? You may know this as repairing a flat. It is required more frequently than any other type of repair you can do on a bike. Although it sounds pretty hard, in reality, once you do it a couple of times it almost becomes second nature. It is really pretty simple. There are twelve steps to fixing your tire.

    The first step is to take the wheel off the bike. This is easily performed on most bikes with caliper brakes by opening the “quick release” lever. The second step is to take the tire off the wheel. To do this you should pull the bead off the rim. That essentially means that you need to pull the tire out of the metal rim on your wheel. You might need plastic tire levers to be able to take it off. The third step is to take the tube off. The tube is underneath the tire and will usually be limp and sagging because it was punctured.

    The fourth sep is a bit strange. You are supposed to put air in your tube and put it under water to find the bubbles. Where the bubbles are is generally where the puncture occurred. However you might be stuck on the side of the road with no water in sight. If you are in this type of situation, it is easiest to

  2. #2
    Sensible shoes. CastIron's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2005
    Location
    St. Paul,MN
    My Bikes
    A few.
    Posts
    8,799
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Bullet point your twelve steps in larger font. Looks like a decent start.
    Mike
    Quote Originally Posted by cedricbosch View Post
    It looks silly when you have quotes from other forum members in your signature. Nobody on this forum is that funny.
    Quote Originally Posted by cedricbosch View Post
    Why am I in your signature.

  3. #3
    Long Distance Cyclist Machka's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2003
    Location
    I ride where the thylacine roamed!
    My Bikes
    Lots
    Posts
    39,293
    Mentioned
    36 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Here's how I change tires ... when I'm practicing in the comfort of my own living room, but it isn't much different when I'm on the side of the road ...

    -- Get the necessary tire changing equipment (levers, new tube, pump, patches, boots, new tire - and no, you won't have to use it all during this learning process, but it is good to know you've got it all)
    -- Remove the rear wheel (because it is harder to remove than the front one)
    -- Release the air in the tire
    -- Remove the tire and tube together
    -- Mark the tire where the valve on the tube is located as a reference point for later
    -- Pull the tube out of the tire
    -- Find the hole (this could be quite a long process)
    -- Keeping track of the hole, place the tube loosely inside the tire using the reference point you made
    -- Check the tire near the spot where the hole in the tube is for possible bits of broken glass or wires or whatever ... it is preferable to do a visual check first so you don't cut yourself, then you might try cautiously feeling for something. Chances are you will find the cuprit. Remove it. (But if you've run over an evil goatshead you might not find anything)
    -- Take a look around inside the rest of the tire for any other foreign matter that may cause another flat.

    And I think I do this next part differently than others, but ...
    -- Fill the new tube a bit (or in this learning case, you would use the original tube because it is still OK), and tuck it inside the tire
    -- Put the valve through the hole on the rim
    -- Start tucking in one side of the tire, taking care not to pinch the tube
    -- Start tucking in the other side of the tire, also taking even greater care not to pinch the tube. You may need to let a bit of air out of the tube during this process if it is really tight, and you will likely need to use the levers right near the end to get the last bit in
    -- Check to make sure it all looks even and that there are no pieces of tube sticking out or caught between the rim and the tire.
    -- Pump the tire up to about 6- or 70 psi, and do another check to makes sure it all looks OK
    -- Finish pumping tire, and replace on bicycle.

  4. #4
    Senior Member Placid Casual's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2005
    Location
    SoCal
    Posts
    942
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by goopster
    ------------------------------------------------------------------------

    Did you know that more than seventy percent of people who ride bikes do not know how to repair a puncture in a tire? You may know this as repairing a flat. It is required more frequently than any other type of repair you can do on a bike. Although it sounds pretty hard, in reality, once you do it a couple of times it almost becomes second nature. It is really pretty simple. There are twelve steps to fixing your tire.

    The first step is to take the wheel off the bike. This is easily performed on most bikes with caliper brakes by opening the “quick release” lever.
    Technically not true. Opening the quick-release lever on your caliper brake does not, in fact, perform the function of taking the wheel off; rather, it's something that you have to do in order to take the wheel off. Nitpicky, I know, but I presume the purpose of this assignment is to teach you how to give instructions to people. And when you're giving instructions, you needn't always go into great detail, but the details you go into must be correct.


    The second step is to take the tire off the wheel. To do this you should pull the bead off the rim.
    Here you may want to briefly explain what a bead is. Non-bike people are not likely to know unless you tell them.


    That essentially means that you need to pull the tire out of the metal rim on your wheel.
    This sentence probably isn't necessary, as you've already told your audience that they'll need to take the tire off the wheel, and that doing so is accomplished by pulling the bead off the rim.


    You might need plastic tire levers to be able to take it off. The third step is to take the tube off. The tube is underneath the tire and will usually be limp and sagging because it was punctured.

    The fourth sep is a bit strange.
    Personally, I would say "tricky" or something like that instead of "strange," since your point is that this step in the process may present some difficulty, but I guess that's a judgement call.


    You are supposed to
    I would replace this with "Ideally, you would..." But that's just a question of wording; and again, I'm being nitpicky.


    put air in your tube and put it under water to find the bubbles. Where the bubbles are is generally where the puncture occurred. However you might be stuck on the side of the road with no water in sight. If you are in this type of situation, it is easiest to
    Hope this constructive criticism helps.

  5. #5
    Immoderator KrisPistofferson's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2004
    Location
    POS Tennessee
    My Bikes
    Gary Fisher Simple City 8, Litespeed Obed
    Posts
    7,636
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by Machka
    Here's how I change tires ... when I'm practicing in the comfort of my own living room,
    That makes me so sad.
    Quote Originally Posted by Bikeforums
    Your rights end where another poster's feelings begin.

  6. #6
    Senior Member localtalent's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2005
    Location
    NY
    My Bikes
    1972 Peugeot UO-8, Strawberry conversion
    Posts
    238
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    I can't provide much help with content, but a few tips on presentation from my personal experience:

    Avoid reading off the paper, it's boring and turns people off. As was said before, make a card with a few bullet points and speak less formally.

    Pictures/props are great.

    Eye contact is key, and don't go fast to try to get it over with

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •