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-   -   Specialized... Made in USA? (http://www.bikeforums.net/general-cycling-discussion/144198-specialized-made-usa.html)

mattzees 10-05-05 10:52 PM

I'm looking at a 2002 Specialized Allez Comp, and I was wondering if anyone knows whether this bike was made in the USA?

UmneyDurak 10-06-05 12:09 AM

A better question is how well it fits you. Why does it matter where it's made? Besides even if something said it's made in USA, most of it's parts come from other countries.

CummingsSM 10-06-05 02:04 AM

Can't tell. Looks like their design facilities are American, but someone in another thread said they're constructed in Taiwan (see http://www.bikeforums.net/road-cycling/103534-specialized-good-not-mentioned-here-much.html). Yet another thread specifically says the Allez is manufactured in Taiwan or China (see http://www.bikeforums.net/road-cycling/44743-giant-tcr-vs-specialized-allez-comp.html)

So, the short answer is no. The only major frame builder that I know produces their frames in America is Trek, but I'm sure someone else can point out a few others.

lilHinault 10-06-05 02:08 AM

I've heard high-end Trek, and also look at the small makers like Rivendell and Rock Lobster and so on.

duckliondog 10-06-05 02:46 AM

There are a ton of frames built in the states, mostly by the little guys though. My Specialized has a "Made in USA" sticker on the seattube. I'm not sure about what that really means, but I do know that I love the bike.

Waldo 10-06-05 06:49 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by CummingsSM
Can't tell. Looks like their design facilities are American, but someone in another thread said they're constructed in Taiwan (see http://www.bikeforums.net/showthread.php?t=103534). Yet another thread specifically says the Allez is manufactured in Taiwan or China (see http://www.bikeforums.net/showthread.php?t=44743)

So, the short answer is no. The only major frame builder that I know produces their frames in America is Trek, but I'm sure someone else can point out a few others.

While you're correct about the Allez being sourced from overseas, you might want to research Trek a bit more. The reality is that the vast majority of their bikes are made in China or Taiwan by Giant.
Cannondale, on the other hand, produces all but the Synapse in the USA.

gurana 10-06-05 07:51 AM

Not sure about the comp, but my allez sport was made in taiwan.

MichaelW 10-06-05 07:55 AM

Merida in Taiwan make a lot of the Specialized frames and are also major shareholder in the company.

Savas 10-06-05 01:16 PM

I think my Jamis Coda it Tai. made.

CummingsSM 10-06-05 01:20 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Waldo
While you're correct about the Allez being sourced from overseas, you might want to research Trek a bit more. The reality is that the vast majority of their bikes are made in China or Taiwan by Giant.

Whoops. Proudly made in Waterloo, Wisconsin. Except for the ones we buy from China and Taiwan. Apparently, they're even going to start moving their "entry level" Carbon Fiber production to Asia. http://www.plasticsnews.com/china/en...?id=1125423827.

skiahh 10-06-05 04:30 PM

I believe even the S-works are now made overseas.

Litespeed - as far as I know - still makes their bikes in the USA... in TN.

ChroMo2 10-06-05 04:34 PM

if you really wanna be cool, buy a Yeti.

Siu Blue Wind 10-06-05 08:21 PM

My Cake by Gary is baked in American ovens. Decal under the clear coat. Gary = Trek.

mattzees 10-06-05 08:44 PM

Hey- Thanks for all the replies. I tried the bike & loved it, so I bought it and rode it 16 miles home. It's made in F-ing Taiwan, but I bought it used, so the money that was going overseas, has already gone there.

If I was buying a new bike, regardless of what it feels like, being made in the USA is of great concern to me. Let the flames begin.

Waldo 10-06-05 08:49 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by skiahh
I believe even the S-works are now made overseas.
Litespeed - as far as I know - still makes their bikes in the USA... in TN.

Litespeed's alu bikes are not US made.

Quote:

Originally Posted by ChroMo2
if you really wanna be cool, buy a Yeti.

I agree, but even they're doing Taiwan on certain models these days.

alanbikehouston 10-06-05 09:38 PM

Back in the 1970's, over ten million bikes were built in the USA each year. However, over the past five years, every "American" mass market bike brand has closed its American facilities, except for two.

So, in 2005, only Trek and Cannondale continue to build bikes in the USA in significant numbers. But, the cost of paying American workers a "living wage" has a price. The only bikes Trek makes in the USA are models selling for over $1,000. And, most Cannondale models sell for over $1,000. That means that most young Americans may never own a bike that was built in America.

Folks who have never owned an American-made bike claim that "it makes no difference" where a bike is made. But, there was one motive, and ONLY one motive for moving production to Asia: cutting costs and increasing profits. Quality and workmanship come at a price...and the quality and workmanship of an American-made Cannondale costs more than a Chino-crap knock-off.

false_cause 10-06-05 10:45 PM

It's a free market. If it was so bad, consumers wouldn't buy it. I'm perfectly happy with my foreign made Trek. That the bikes made overseas still sell so well is it itself a demonstration that either there isn't a difference in quality, or any difference is small enough most of the market can't tell or doesn't care about it.

Siu Blue Wind 10-06-05 10:51 PM

And to think of the employee abuses in these "Labor Camps". XMart falls into this category. Big time. No health coverage, underage labor (children start work at age 11), no safety precautions (highly toxic glues and paints inhaled without ventilation), 10-16 hour days, no days off, all for 17 cents per hour.

In case you were wondering, our group did years and years of research on this, with "rescues" of those actual employees. We did this to show the impact of labor outside the U.S. and how strong stores like Xmart are in the pressuring tactics and "predator pricing".

To make this bike related, notice some models of bikes Xmart sells are not available on the said bike company's website or cannot be found at an LBS. Those companies were forced to downgrade the quality (cheaper alloys, components) of those bikes or else lose the contract with Xmart. Certain models were made exclusively for Xmart. To their specs. At the price they (Xmart) wants to pay. That equals cheaper prices.

I am not speaking of all Asian bikes. For gosh sakes, I own an Asian Trek. I'm speaking only of Xmart. My feeling is that the better line bikes from Asia might just have American quality control. Which could be why the bikes hold up so well.

johno 10-06-05 11:30 PM

When it comes to quality bikes, let's not forget the European countries such as Italy and France, that still manufacture quite a few high end bikes. Colnago, Pinarello, Bianchi, Wilier... good enough for you?

I own a pair of 30 year old British built Falcon cycles, all Campy and 531 frame. Magnificently built, and finished with far more attention to detail than most high end bikes today.

01GTB 10-07-05 01:56 AM

I made my decision today, I am going to be buying a Cannondale. Call me stupid if you like, I remember when it was encouraged to buy American. I know the frame is going to be about the only thing US made on it, but it's a start. I have nothing against bikes made in Taiwan or any other country for that matter. Well, maybe China :o

In the past I have spent a good deal of time and probably money trying to buy things made in the US. A lot of times I find items made here cost no more than those made in China, sometimes it's only a little more. Companies are not sending production to other countries to save you money, they are doing it make more for themselves.

ChroMo2 10-07-05 05:44 PM

the biggest frame builder in the world is in Taiwan and they make good frames according to the bike builders specifications. It's more frame geometry that you should be concerned with. if your gonna jump your bike or do serious "bombing" on your bike (as in professional racing) a Taiwan bike isn't the best choice. their matalurgical processes are less than American or certain other countries. The ultimate materials would surely come from the U.S.A., but your gonna pay for it. Even titanium bikes come in two different grades pushing a high end frame to around three thousand dollars. Otherwise a 6061 or 7000 series aluminum bike frame can cost about a grand. And then the components are gonna get expensive (who wants to put cheap components on a good frame) you could easily spend a thousand dollars on the drivetrain.

skiahh 10-07-05 05:57 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Waldo
Litespeed's alu bikes are not US made.

Good point. I just don't think of LS as an alu bike maker!

Quote:

Originally Posted by alanbikehouston
Folks who have never owned an American-made bike claim that "it makes no difference" where a bike is made. But, there was one motive, and ONLY one motive for moving production to Asia: cutting costs and increasing profits. Quality and workmanship come at a price...and the quality and workmanship of an American-made Cannondale costs more than a Chino-crap knock-off.

Oh, horse hockey. I'll put my Merida made Specialized up against any Cannondale anyday. Companies move their production offshore to keep costs (and therefore price) low while still being able to generate fair profits.

For example - how many of us are going to run out and buy the new SJ or Epic (S-works) carbon bikes at $7100? And if they were made here in the US, how much more would they cost to generate the same profit margin for Specialized? (I don't know - maybe they are made here and that's why they're so much?)

Quality isn't an issue between US and overseas production in most cases. It's about cost and profit. US workers - union or not - cost a lot more than overseas workers; even where the comany does ensure good working conditions for its employees.

Feltup 10-07-05 08:24 PM

I have both American and Taiwan and can't tell a difference. It is just a form of racism to think there is a big difference in workmanship.

Savas 10-07-05 09:14 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by johno
When it comes to quality bikes, let's not forget the European countries such as Italy and France, that still manufacture quite a few high end bikes. Colnago, Pinarello, Bianchi, Wilier... good enough for you?

I own a pair of 30 year old British built Falcon cycles, all Campy and 531 frame. Magnificently built, and finished with far more attention to detail than most high end bikes today.

I heard Bianchi has not been made in Italy for some time now.

halfspeed 10-07-05 11:23 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Savas
I heard Bianchi has not been made in Italy for some time now.

You heard wrong. Like other large manufacturers, the lower end bikes are made in Asia and the higher end are made at home.


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