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  1. #26
    Rides again HiYoSilver's Avatar
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    Ok, you have a LBS that will work with you, that's great. Now step back a moment. You started at a $400 level and now are looking at $650 bikes. You said sometimes you get buyer's remorse, right? With a true entry level bike, it will be more prone to problems than a good starter bike. I was at the same crossroads not too long ago. I decided to set my purchase point for good starter bike at $1,000. I looked and rode bikes at my target +/- $300. That really helped. What helped even more was to come back another day for a short ride of the bikes I liked the first go around. That second ride was the telling ride. Several at the top of my list, disappeared. I ended up with a $1,200 bike and never regretted it. Because I spent over $1k, I had to validate my purchase and had to go riding more. I would have just p***d off the $500 bike and would be sitting in the garage.

    The only "bad news" about cycling, is I am enjoying it too much. I'm planning on adding 3 hours sat am group rides and buying another bike. This time it will be a great bike, with cyclesdales wheels, a more rider friendly frame, and easier to pedal in the wind. It'll be like buying an old used car, so it's budgeted for next year. [You don't want to know how much.] But putting a bundle on a used car bike is a lot better than buying a pace maker and medical supplies.
    Hi 'o Silver away

  2. #27
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    Quote Originally Posted by HiYoSilver
    Ok, you have a LBS that will work with you, that's great. Now step back a moment. You started at a $400 level and now are looking at $650 bikes. You said sometimes you get buyer's remorse, right? With a true entry level bike, it will be more prone to problems than a good starter bike. I was at the same crossroads not too long ago. I decided to set my purchase point for good starter bike at $1,000. I looked and rode bikes at my target +/- $300. That really helped. What helped even more was to come back another day for a short ride of the bikes I liked the first go around. That second ride was the telling ride. Several at the top of my list, disappeared. I ended up with a $1,200 bike and never regretted it. Because I spent over $1k, I had to validate my purchase and had to go riding more. I would have just p***d off the $500 bike and would be sitting in the garage.

    The only "bad news" about cycling, is I am enjoying it too much. I'm planning on adding 3 hours sat am group rides and buying another bike. This time it will be a great bike, with cyclesdales wheels, a more rider friendly frame, and easier to pedal in the wind. It'll be like buying an old used car, so it's budgeted for next year. [You don't want to know how much.] But putting a bundle on a used car bike is a lot better than buying a pace maker and medical supplies.
    I think my main reason for raising my price is just to have a broader selection instead of just the 4500. Also $500 isn't going to break the bank and neither would a $1000 so as much as I don't really want to up my price, I don't want to limit my purchase and miss out on a bike I might love because I don't spend a couple hundred more. Obviously there has to be some cutoff and I would say that would be $1000. At that price I would have to give a test ride and just know this is the bike for me. At the same time I have no real problem only dropping $500 to grab the Trek 4500 and 6 months to a year if I am still riding spending spending 1000-1500 for the next bike. Like I said I know I am over thinking this whole thing so who knows maybe when I go tonight the 4500 may just be the bike that sells me.
    So far based on what I have seen at the LBS here are my choices.


    Below $500
    Trek 4500
    Kona Fire Mountain


    Below $700
    Gary Fischer Tassajara
    and a couple more which I haven't looked at yet.

  3. #28
    Barbieri Telefonico huhenio's Avatar
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    If you are a heavy guy I would suggest that you look at Rykoala's (a user here) setup.

    Hardtail fixedgear, 26 inch slicks, indestructible. Once you go down a 100 pounds and you feel the need for speed (being speed=fun) go and knock yourself silly with all the obnitanium (a fabled metal that weighs less than air) you want.

    Getting a single speed mountain to speed takes serious wattage - or power output - and you are not sure yet that you want to spend a lot of money into something that will not be AS GOOD in the future, once you put 5 or 6k miles under your belt.

    It is true that you will not be wanting to shortchange yourself buying substandard equipment, but it is also true that you need to get a cheap and low manteinance ride to put your first thousand miles before you decide wether you like it or not.
    Giving Haircuts Over The Phone

  4. #29
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    rmwun54, very inspiring post

  5. #30
    Rides again HiYoSilver's Avatar
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    Wow, what fun. It's hard to give valid advise when we don't know your situation:

    Which is a higher turn on to you?
    [ ] bouncing around over rocks and bumps and slittering between trees, or
    [ ] easy pedaling with a smoother ride

    What surfaces do you want to ride on?
    [ ] asphalt roads
    [ ] multi use paths
    [ ] gravel roads
    [ ] dirt roads
    [ ] open ground following animal paths, or making my own

    What is your terrain like?
    [ ] mostly level with some rolling
    [ ] mixed level but some decent hills to climb
    [ ] very hilly, with lots of hills to climb

    What is your weather like?
    [ ] typical, and mostly clear
    [ ] like seattle, portland, mostly moist

    What is the fastest you think you might like to ride?
    [ ] 5 to 10 mph
    [ ] 11 to 15 mph
    [ ] 16 to 20 mph
    [ ] as fast as I can

    After answering those questions, then look at features:
    [ ] are suspensions best for my riding?
    [ ] are the tire widths the best for my type of riding?
    [ ] does the bike I'm looking at give me the gears I need for my riding?
    [ ] would I be satisfied 6 months after purchase with an 8 speed shifter instead of 9 speed?


    What a cool slew of bikes to consider:
    TREK
    1000 $710, road bars for 3 riding positions, looks like a nice easy ride fast bike
    7500 $650, hybrid, suspension, for the hills and dales and rock jumping
    SU200, $500, straight forks, disk brakes, for value and no rock jumping
    7.5 FX $700, good gears:26/36/48 11:32, another one to ride

    KONA
    kikapu $1000, double suspension, give me a nice rough trail and I'll ride it
    drew delux, $600, 8 speed, decent value bike
    dr dew, $1000, 9 speed, disc, 11-32 700x38, favorite on this forum of kona riders
    jake, $800, 8 speed 12-25, 700x35, if not hilly area or moist area, potentially good ride
    jake the snake, $1200, 12-25, 700x35, another good bike, looks like better specs than dr dew

    FISCHER
    utopia $800. 26.36.48 11.34, good climber
    kaitai, $620, 28.38.48 susp, 8 speed, 700x42, budget climber

    Trek does also make the soho for more level ground, or those who just can't get gear changes.
    It only has 9 gears, but looks like a dependable ride with disc brakes. FYI disc brakes add
    about $200 to the cost of a bike, but you don't have to maintain the brake pads as often
    or replace them.


    Have fun, and let us know how it goes. Again without knowing your situation and your riding
    preferences, can't narrow down the choice for you any more. But if it were I, I would at least look at, and probably ride each of the potential bikes listed. They are all in budget and riding them would give you a better idea of what you like and dislike.
    Hi 'o Silver away

  6. #31
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    Guessing mostly because I don't know what I will be doing 3 months from now assuming I stick with it.

    Which is a higher turn on to you?
    [ ] bouncing around over rocks and bumps and slittering between trees, or
    [X] easy pedaling with a smoother ride

    What surfaces do you want to ride on?
    [X] asphalt roads
    [X] multi use paths
    [X] gravel roads
    [X] dirt roads
    [ ] open ground following animal paths, or making my own

    What is your terrain like?
    [X] mostly level with some rolling...Welcome to Tampa
    [ ] mixed level but some decent hills to climb
    [ ] very hilly, with lots of hills to climb

    What is your weather like?
    [ ] typical, and mostly clear
    [X] like seattle, portland, mostly moist

    What is the fastest you think you might like to ride?
    [ ] 5 to 10 mph
    [ ] 11 to 15 mph
    [ ] 16 to 20 mph
    [X] as fast as I can

  7. #32
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    Based on your previous reply, you should consider something like this:

    Kona Jake the Snake

    twice your budget (though excellent value), but a rugged road bike that goes on light trails, and fast too!

  8. #33
    Rides again HiYoSilver's Avatar
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    Ok, only one itsy, bitsy, tiny, winney problem. One bike won't do everything. Go fast as I can and go on dirt and gravel roads don't work well together. At least not in your budget. The ideal bike for this is called a cyclocross, but is about $500+ more.

    No curb jumping and no open field riding, means you don't need nor want rear or front suspension forks. They will slow you down and gain you nothing.

    Terrain mostly level, means you can get by with closer gear combinations.

    Go fast means thinner tires, like 700x23 or 700x25. Go over gravel and rocks means wider tires, like 700x35 or 700x37 or 700x42. [700mm is the diameter. x## is the width of the tire in mm. 1" is 25.4mm].

    Wet climate, means you need disc brakes, especially if you're going fast.

    My recommendations. Forget fischer, doesn't match your need. I can't believe this. I'm recommending a hybrid. Excuse me for a moment, a barf is coming. Ok, Trek would be the 7.5 Disc for $800. It has nice inbetween tire size: 700x32. Great price, but I would ask the LBS to swap out the rear 11:32 cassette for an 11:27 or 12:27. You don't need the extra gears and the closer range cassette will make riding a lot more fun. Second option, would be the Kona Dr Dew, $1,000. Like I said before lots of people here have that bike and I haven't heard anything bad about it. It does have the disc brakes for your wet environment. Disadvantages are wide tires and wide rear gears. Here have LBS swap out the 700x70 mtn tires for road tires about 700x32. Also swap out the 11:32 rear cassette for a 12:25 or 12:27, like jake the snake.
    Third choice would be jake the snake. It's disadvantages are 1. cost and 2. it only has 2 chainrings on front, a double, instead of a triple. But if all this is outweighted by speed, consider the Specialized sirrur pro for about $1600 or the Cannondale Bad boy disc for $1000.

    Considering everything you said, I would make it a toss up between the Trek 7.5 disc for $800 or the Dr Dew for $1,000.

    Ride them, ride them, then you will know. Have fun...
    Hi 'o Silver away

  9. #34
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    Hiyo Silver---I live in Broomfield too. I'm looking at either the Jake the Snake or the Bianchi Volpe. Someplace in downtown Boulder sells the Kona. I took it for a ride and it was lightning fast. I thought I really wanted steel but wow I could give up a little bit of comfort for something that responsive. It also has a great Avid brake setup with the mountain type handles.

    I rode the Bianchi, which is only about $175 less. It has triple chainrings and a comfortable steel ride. It's not as quick as the Kona. I didn't like the feel of the Tiagra hoods near as much as the 105 hoods and handlebar on the Kona (which is 105 all around). The Bianchi has a Deore in the rear so it provides really wide gear selection. 11-32

    Now I would go ahead and get the Kona except that it's a dual chainring. They said they can put a 34/50 up front and I would have 12-25 on the rear. I don't plan on carrying a bunch of gear on long tours, but I do have to carry my 215 pounds up some really big hills (McCaslin, etc) and I'm not in that great of shape yet. I'm not sure what the max cassette you can put on a 105, but if I could get it up to a 30 or so I might be satisfied with the gear selection on the Kona. Otherwise I might need to look at Deore-equipped bikes only.

    I should mention that my concerns are 1. mainly road riding 2. occassional dirt/gravel 3. drop bars are a must 4. I like to keep my cadence fairly high going uphill.

  10. #35
    Senior Member Jarery's Avatar
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    Schmoab
    I put a 11-32 on a 2006 model jake the snake.
    Left the chainrings along. Didnt have to futz with the rear derailer at all. Total cost was about $45 bucks installed.
    Jarery

    -If you cant see it from space, its not a real hill
    -If two bikes are going in the same direction, ITS A RACE!

  11. #36
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    Cool... I'm leaning towards just swapping the chainrings and casette and going with the Kona. I think the shop will do it for free.

  12. #37
    Rides again HiYoSilver's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by schmoab
    Hiyo Silver---I live in Broomfield too.
    Now I would go ahead and get the Kona except that it's a dual chainring. They said they can put a 34/50 up front and I would have 12-25 on the rear. I don't plan on carrying a bunch of gear on long tours, but I do have to carry my 215 pounds up some really big hills (McCaslin, etc) and I'm not in that great of shape yet. I'm not sure what the max cassette you can put on a 105, but if I could get it up to a 30 or so I might be satisfied with the gear selection on the Kona. Otherwise I might need to look at Deore-equipped bikes only.

    I should mention that my concerns are 1. mainly road riding 2. occassional dirt/gravel 3. drop bars are a must 4. I like to keep my cadence fairly high going uphill.
    Welcome. We're about the same size. I need to add more miles this year. I've only been cyclocommuting, so if you want to go riding some time PM me.

    I would NOT recommend the 12:25. I had a 30.42.52 x 12:23 that was too high when winter came. It was fine for spring and summer. But riding up interlocken with winter headwinds was just too much. I swapped that out to a 26.42.54x 12:27 and that works fine. Well I've never tried the hill up to Level 3 as it looks too steep. The hill from interlocken up to the airport is doable but you have to mash instead of spin.
    If you need, I can figure out the GI numbers for you.

    And yes, when I bought my Giant, Performance swapped out the initial cassette for free. Second change was on my nickel but I have the original rings and cassette.
    Hi 'o Silver away

  13. #38
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    Quote Originally Posted by HiYoSilver
    Ok, only one itsy, bitsy, tiny, winney problem. One bike won't do everything. Go fast as I can and go on dirt and gravel roads don't work well together. At least not in your budget. The ideal bike for this is called a cyclocross, but is about $500+ more.

    Sorry I was at lunch when I replied so I didn't get a chance to elaborate when I replied. When I say go as fast as I can, I merely mean whatever speed I can push myself to do, but I don't expect to be blazing fast. Honestly I just got back from test riding the Tassajara and the 4500 and just tooling around in the neighborhood is fast enough for me for now. Yeah maybe down the line I may want to go really fast but for now as a out of shape beginner I don't expect to go fast. I would actually say for now I would say my speed would be 5-10 and maybe 11-15 but definitely not at a constant until I get into better shape.
    Quote Originally Posted by HiYoSilver
    No curb jumping and no open field riding, means you don't need nor want rear or front suspension forks. They will slow you down and gain you nothing.

    Terrain mostly level, means you can get by with closer gear combinations.

    Go fast means thinner tires, like 700x23 or 700x25. Go over gravel and rocks means wider tires, like 700x35 or 700x37 or 700x42. [700mm is the diameter. x## is the width of the tire in mm. 1" is 25.4mm].
    I can see myself going a little off road and I would rather have the option than limit myself to not being able to. I think I would feel more comfortable on a wider tire also.

    Quote Originally Posted by HiYoSilver
    Wet climate, means you need disc brakes, especially if you're going fast.

    My recommendations. Forget fischer, doesn't match your need. I can't believe this. I'm recommending a hybrid. Excuse me for a moment, a barf is coming. Ok, Trek would be the 7.5 Disc for $800. It has nice inbetween tire size: 700x32. Great price, but I would ask the LBS to swap out the rear 11:32 cassette for an 11:27 or 12:27. You don't need the extra gears and the closer range cassette will make riding a lot more fun. Second option, would be the Kona Dr Dew, $1,000. Like I said before lots of people here have that bike and I haven't heard anything bad about it. It does have the disc brakes for your wet environment. Disadvantages are wide tires and wide rear gears. Here have LBS swap out the 700x70 mtn tires for road tires about 700x32. Also swap out the 11:32 rear cassette for a 12:25 or 12:27, like jake the snake.
    Third choice would be jake the snake. It's disadvantages are 1. cost and 2. it only has 2 chainrings on front, a double, instead of a triple. But if all this is outweighted by speed, consider the Specialized sirrur pro for about $1600 or the Cannondale Bad boy disc for $1000.

    Considering everything you said, I would make it a toss up between the Trek 7.5 disc for $800 or the Dr Dew for $1,000.

    Ride them, ride them, then you will know. Have fun...
    Hybrids were what I went out looking for when I first started but truth be told I have yet to see one. They always end up showing me mountain bikes but oh well. They are having a 10% off sale tomorrow night so I figure I will go buy then just because I am getting to the point where I am tired of looking. It really has come down to the Trek 4500 and the Fischer Tassajara. Thinking about it I really didn't notice a difference which I spent about an hour test riding them on the street only which I know makes a difference. Paint wise I prefer the Trek 4500 which I know is not the way to pick a bike lol. The employee commented that on the Tass the front suspension wasn't nearly as compressed as the Trek 4500 which he said was about 50% when I was on it but I don't think I noticed a difference. Can I say difference one more time lol?

    Trek 4500...$479.99
    Fischer Tassajara...$699.99 -10%

  14. #39
    Senior Member stella's Avatar
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    brennok,

    you found the first important piece of bike shopping: a lbs you feel comfortable going to. The two bikes you mentioned sound great for your needs. From what I read from your posts I assume the following: 1) high school was a long time ago (welcome to the club--if that is the case, you are not alone ); 2) you are out of shape and want to get back into shape; 3) you are more comfortable in an upright position.

    start off with the bike you like, rides comfortably and fits. also, invest in a helmet, bike pump (the kind you can carry w/you when you ride), spare tube, tire levers and a pair of cycling shorts. They do make cycling shorts called "baggies." these have a liner w/padding but look like regular shorts. When you purchase a new bike, a lot of shops will offer discounts on such accessories.

    Keep in mind with helmets--more expensive doesn't necessarily mean "more safe." more expensive usually means "more holes = more ventilation = more expensive to build to meet safety standards."

    0nce you make the purchase, ask the guys at the shop to teach you how to change a flat. Not a skill I want to/or have had to use that often, but one the best cycling skills I have.

    Also, see if there are local bike paths to ride on. The crew at the LBS should be able to help you out. Here in RI, the Dept of Transportation puts out a free map. I just go to their website, there's a link for "cycling" and I order a new map every year. I don't know if Florida offers that, worth a try.

    good luck on your search! Keep us posted, I am curious as to how it turns out.

    Most importantly, welcome to the cycling community!

    stella

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    Quote Originally Posted by stella
    brennok,

    you found the first important piece of bike shopping: a lbs you feel comfortable going to. The two bikes you mentioned sound great for your needs. From what I read from your posts I assume the following: 1) high school was a long time ago (welcome to the club--if that is the case, you are not alone ); 2) you are out of shape and want to get back into shape; 3) you are more comfortable in an upright position.

    start off with the bike you like, rides comfortably and fits. also, invest in a helmet, bike pump (the kind you can carry w/you when you ride), spare tube, tire levers and a pair of cycling shorts. They do make cycling shorts called "baggies." these have a liner w/padding but look like regular shorts. When you purchase a new bike, a lot of shops will offer discounts on such accessories.

    Keep in mind with helmets--more expensive doesn't necessarily mean "more safe." more expensive usually means "more holes = more ventilation = more expensive to build to meet safety standards."

    0nce you make the purchase, ask the guys at the shop to teach you how to change a flat. Not a skill I want to/or have had to use that often, but one the best cycling skills I have.

    Also, see if there are local bike paths to ride on. The crew at the LBS should be able to help you out. Here in RI, the Dept of Transportation puts out a free map. I just go to their website, there's a link for "cycling" and I order a new map every year. I don't know if Florida offers that, worth a try.

    good luck on your search! Keep us posted, I am curious as to how it turns out.

    Most importantly, welcome to the cycling community!

    stella

    Yeah 94 graduate and really stopped riding back in 91 or so.
    Yeah out of shape definitely lol. I went from working on my feet for several years and doing martial arts on a daily basis to a desk job with a knee I injured in a sparring match. Currently I play beach volleyball on Sundays and thats about it.
    Yeah I never really rode a road bike except once or twice back in grade school and even then I preferred the more upright position of the mountain bikes.

    As far as some of the local trails , Flatwoods is the closest being about 15 minutes from my work and Morris Bridge is also close I believe.

    I also want to say thanks to everyone for the suggestions and patience with another noob.
    I figure I will make the decision sometime tomorrow maybe even at a last test ride. So if anyone has any last suggestions I will try to check the boards at work before I buy.

    LOL and of course I check the other bike shops webpage, the sister shop of the one I have been looking at. On their site they have a sale on March 29th-April 2nd, the Trek Super sale --- Save Up to 50% on cycling accessories, bikes, apparel, & More!. Too bad the 2005 Marlin they have is only in the 21 since they have it for 299.99

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    Sorry for the hijack, but to reply to Hiyo Silver--I live at the very top of the mesa--above Level 3. Your statement makes me feel better about the fact that I spend most of the time in my granny gear on my mountain bike to get home. It's good for fitness, but I need to lose at least 30 pounds.

    I can't belive you run a 26 granny! I have no idea what's on my MTB, but it's probably something like that. I figure the stiffness of the cross bike will make me a lot more efficient, not to mention the lower weight. So I might go with a 50/34 and 11-32 setup on a Jake the Snake. Obviously we have different concerns here in Colorado than one would have in Florida! I know what that's like--I used to live in Wichita, where the stock JTS setup would be awesome.

  17. #42
    Rides again HiYoSilver's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by brennok
    Yeah I never really rode a road bike except once or twice back in grade school and even then I preferred the more upright position of the mountain bikes.
    Just so you know there are road bikes and then there are road bikes. For example, Giant makes 2 different geometry road bikes, the OCR and the TCR. The OCR geometry is more relaxed like a hybrid so when you ride with your hands on the top bar it feels exactly the same as a mtn bike with a straight bar. Most riders don't ride in the dropped bars but about 1 inch lower than the top bar, with their hands on the brake hoods. Naturally on longer rides, the rider changes from top of bar to top of the hoods to give the body a rest. With a mtn bike you don't have that alternative 2nd position. [normal bars ok]
    Many bikes, like mine, have "suicide brakes" which are the mtn bike brakes that are parallel to the bar.

    Sounds like you set your heart on the Trek. It's like choosing a bronco over a taurus or mustang. If a year down the road you want a different bike, you can always sell this one and get a new one. The cost is low and cheaper than a year of gym fees.

    Again, have fun with it and enjoy the ride.
    Hi 'o Silver away

  18. #43
    Rides again HiYoSilver's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by schmoab
    Sorry for the hijack, but to reply to Hiyo Silver--I live at the very top of the mesa--above Level 3. Your statement makes me feel better about the fact that I spend most of the time in my granny gear on my mountain bike to get home.

    I can't belive you run a 26 granny! I have no idea what's on my MTB, but it's probably something like that. I figure the stiffness of the cross bike will make me a lot more efficient, not to mention the lower weight. So I might go with a 50/34 and 11-32 setup on a Jake the Snake.
    If you give us the model number of your MTB, we could probably figure out the gearing. You must live in the RC area.


    34 ring x 32 cassette == 28 G. Inches. 26 ring x 27 cassette == 26 GI. About 2 gears lower. Previously my low was 35GI which is just too high for this area. I haven't decided if I want to drop to a 22 or 24 ring later. I'm primarily focused on improving my conditioning this year, and then next year do upgrades.

    At your load level, a lb or 2 in bike is a low percentage of total weight of mass moving up the hill. I wouldn't count on huge differences.

    INTERLOCKEN A
    http://www.gmap-pedometer.com/?r=67651
    distance .36 mi, 79' climb from interlocken to 128/120th. Grade 4%

    INTERLOCKEN B
    http://www.gmap-pedometer.com/?r=67655.
    distance .36 miles, 56' climb from interlocken along eldorado, Grade 3%

    INTERLOCKEN C
    http://www.gmap-pedometer.com/?r=67662.
    1.34 miles, 341' climb from interlocken loop pass level 3 to 120th/128, Grade 5%.

    Route A-- I can climb anywhere from low gear on middle ring to granny gear, 26 GI to 43GI, it depends on wind and how I'm feeling.

    Route B-- one section needs granny gear, but average isn't bad.

    Route C-- never tried, but plan to try some weekend just to see what it's like and how far off my gearing is.
    Hi 'o Silver away

  19. #44
    . bbattle's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by brennok
    Guessing mostly because I don't know what I will be doing 3 months from now assuming I stick with it.

    Which is a higher turn on to you?
    [ ] bouncing around over rocks and bumps and slittering between trees, or
    [X] easy pedaling with a smoother ride

    What surfaces do you want to ride on?
    [X] asphalt roads
    [X] multi use paths
    [X] gravel roads
    [X] dirt roads
    [ ] open ground following animal paths, or making my own

    What is your terrain like?
    [X] mostly level with some rolling...Welcome to Tampa
    [ ] mixed level but some decent hills to climb
    [ ] very hilly, with lots of hills to climb

    What is your weather like?
    [ ] typical, and mostly clear
    [X] like seattle, portland, mostly moist

    What is the fastest you think you might like to ride?
    [ ] 5 to 10 mph
    [ ] 11 to 15 mph
    [ ] 16 to 20 mph
    [X] as fast as I can

    Based on your responses, the Trek FX series may be just the ticket. You can put some treaded tires on for those sandy trails. It's a fast bike with a more upright geometry like the mountain bikes but it's faster on the roads. Can put racks on the front and back if you want to do some touring or carrying groceries.

  20. #45
    Rides again HiYoSilver's Avatar
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    Here's the trek cheatsheet

    trek fitness bike line

    MODEL__MSRP_Chainring_x_Cassette_speeds_component level_color
    7.7 FX -- $1700 , 30.39.52 x 12:27, 10 speed, Ultegra/105, silver
    7.6 FX -- $1040 , 36.50 x 12:26, 9speed, 105/SRAM, red
    7.5 FX -- $700 , 26.36.48 x 11:32, 9 speed, Deore/SRAM, silver
    7.5 FX Disc -- $810, 26.36.48 x 11:32, 9 speed, Deore/SRAM, black
    7.3 FX -- $490, 28.38.48 x 11:32, 8 speed, Deore/SRAM, orange or black
    7.3 FX Disc -- $600, 28.38.48 x 11:32, 8 speed, Deore/SRAM, black
    7.2 FX -- $420, 28.38.48 x 11:32, 8 speed, C series/SRAM, blue or red
    Hi 'o Silver away

  21. #46
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    LOL....I bought a bike but none of the ones I had been looking at. Unfortunately I don't have my digital camera so no pictures for now. After thinking about it I remembered I had $300.00 coming my way from parents who purchased some gift cards I got from work as a bonus. I figured I would take some of the advice and up my budget from $600 to $900 to look at other bikes.

    First today was a sale where all bikes were 10% off. Second they had pulled several bikes over from the sister store so they actually had a couple I hadn't seen before. First thing I noticed was they had the Kona Hoss. I gave that ride which I liked but it was an 18 which was too small. They didn't have a 20 in stock and at the same time I wasn't sure if the 20 would be too big. Then while looking around I noticed it. I checked and it was a 19. The paint job was a nice solid blue. More importantly it looked like it would be a perfect fit for me. I gave it a test ride and it seemed just about right. The fork seemed to handle my weight quite well and with that I was sold.

    And presenting my new bike....Gary Fischer Cobia

  22. #47
    Rides again HiYoSilver's Avatar
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    Enjoy, you can also head cross country with that bike and make you own trails.
    Hi 'o Silver away

  23. #48
    Senior Member ReptilesBlade's Avatar
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    Just a general idea of where I am coming from.

    Which is a higher turn on to you?
    [ ] bouncing around over rocks and bumps and slittering between trees, or
    [X] easy pedaling with a smoother ride

    What surfaces do you want to ride on?
    [X] asphalt roads
    [X] multi use paths
    [ ] gravel roads
    [ ] dirt roads
    [ ] open ground following animal paths, or making my own

    What is your terrain like?
    [ ] mostly level with some rolling
    [ ] mixed level but some decent hills to climb
    [X] very hilly, with lots of hills to climb (A thousand curses on the HILLS!)

    What is your weather like?
    [X] typical, and mostly clear
    [ ] like seattle, portland, mostly moist

    What is the fastest you think you might like to ride?
    [ ] 5 to 10 mph
    [ ] 11 to 15 mph
    [X] 16 to 20 mph
    [ ] as fast as I can

    I know that when I am in decent condition my cruising speed on level ground hovers between 14-16MPH and I can do short sprints up to 20-25MPH. Downhill speed is in the 25-30MPH range.

    After answering those questions, then look at features:
    [ ] are suspensions best for my riding? (I first thought so but no.)
    [X] are the tire widths the best for my type of riding?
    [X] does the bike I'm looking at give me the gears I need for my riding?
    [ ] would I be satisfied 6 months after purchase with an 8 speed shifter instead of 9 speed?


    What a cool slew of bikes to consider:
    TREK
    7500 $650, hybrid, suspension, for the hills and dales and rock jumping

    For the record I am giving serious thought to dumping the suspension for a carbon fork. It just does not absorb the kind of bumps I want it too and I cannot figure out how to get it to do so on my own.

    Overall I love my 7500, but I have said that before.
    Last edited by ReptilesBlade; 03-16-06 at 10:30 PM.
    My intro and log topic. If you want to get to know me cruise on by.

    http://www.bikeforums.net/introductions/177616-long-past-time-i-made-post-warning-long.html

  24. #49
    Senior Member stella's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by brennok
    LOL....I bought a bike but none of the ones I had been looking at. Unfortunately I don't have my digital camera so no pictures for now. After thinking about it I remembered I had $300.00 coming my way from parents who purchased some gift cards I got from work as a bonus. I figured I would take some of the advice and up my budget from $600 to $900 to look at other bikes.

    First today was a sale where all bikes were 10% off. Second they had pulled several bikes over from the sister store so they actually had a couple I hadn't seen before. First thing I noticed was they had the Kona Hoss. I gave that ride which I liked but it was an 18 which was too small. They didn't have a 20 in stock and at the same time I wasn't sure if the 20 would be too big. Then while looking around I noticed it. I checked and it was a 19. The paint job was a nice solid blue. More importantly it looked like it would be a perfect fit for me. I gave it a test ride and it seemed just about right. The fork seemed to handle my weight quite well and with that I was sold.

    And presenting my new bike....Gary Fischer Cobia
    Congrats on the new ride!

    Beware of the disease that afflicts many of us on this forum: cyclohism: evidenced by a need for more bikes to do different things; a need to rebuild old bikes to save them from the trash; men who are man enough to shave their legs and the women who love them; if you don't begin to work in a bike shop part time or full time--you have the need to go to your local lbs "just to say hi" and check out the new stuff on a frequent basis.

    there are other symptoms, I'm sure others can add to this list.

    I started out mtn biking and then discovered road riding, then wanted to commute to work...(I still love mtn biking even though it freaks my 10y/o daughter out--she's afraid Mommy will get hurt, but--she asked me this year if we can go "ride on dirt" somewhere, we will check out an abandoned fire road in the area).
    After over 10years of riding, I now own 4: 1 mtn bike (Kona Cindercone, converted to a singlespeed, upgraded brakes; use off road); a "cruiser" (old denault english riding bike--saved it from oblivian (sp?) and use it when riding w/my 10y/o); a batavus touring bike (yd sale find for $7.00, my beater bike around town--run errrands on this); and my road bike--a colnago w/campy chorus (long rides w/friends or on my own).

    keep us posted with how it's going!

  25. #50
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    I went for a brief ride last night. I would have gone longer but my allergies kept acting up. There is nothing like having a sneezing fit multiple times when riding. Even better I woke up with a sore throat lol. Yay for allergies.

    I do have two things I noticed. I am guessing I may need to have them raise the handlebars since my hands started to go numb there at the end or is it just that I am not used to riding?

    The other issue which concerns me a little is I have no clearance when standing over the bike. I know I checked this in the store so the only thing I can think is I had thicker tennis shoes on. With my back against the seat, the frame is firmly pressed against me. I am not sure what to do about this or if I should worry about it. Fischer makes a Cobia in the 17.5 but I am afraid it would be like the Kona Hoss at 18 where it felt like my hands were at my knees instead of a little more stretched out which I prefer. Any thoughts?
    I figure I will check with the LBS when I stop by this afternoon. I left my clipless pedals there since I had them put platforms on for now.

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