Cycling and bicycle discussion forums. 
   Click here to join our community Log in to access your Control Panel  


Go Back   > >

General Cycling Discussion Have a cycling related question or comment that doesn't fit in one of the other specialty forums? Drop on in and post in here! When possible, please select the forum above that most fits your post!

User Tag List

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Old 03-13-06, 11:34 PM   #1
iancillo
Newbie
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: Quebec
Bikes: MTB, Full susp.
Posts: 1
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Best Bike Maintenance Book?

i'm a newbie, like everybody we start with the first step, right? well i've always ridden to get around or for fun, now it's more of a transportation system (slowly going to winter too)! but i'm sick and tired of paying bills for shop's maintenance and repairs... i know some basics of maintenance. BUT COULD ANYBODY TELL ME THAT IF "The Big Blue Book Of Bicycle Repair" BY PARK TOOLS IS A GOOD BOOK (to start with)? i just bought "mountain bike maintenance" by mel allwood. but i was wondering if any of you have any advice?
iancillo is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-14-06, 08:05 AM   #2
Peek the Geek
is slower than you
 
Peek the Geek's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2005
Location: WI
Bikes: Gunnar Sport, Marin Pine Mountain, Gunnar Ruffian, Gunnar Roadie, BMC Fourstroke, Salsa Vaya
Posts: 1,486
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by iancillo
i'm a newbie, like everybody we start with the first step, right? well i've always ridden to get around or for fun, now it's more of a transportation system (slowly going to winter too)! but i'm sick and tired of paying bills for shop's maintenance and repairs... i know some basics of maintenance. BUT COULD ANYBODY TELL ME THAT IF "The Big Blue Book Of Bicycle Repair" BY PARK TOOLS IS A GOOD BOOK (to start with)? i just bought "mountain bike maintenance" by mel allwood. but i was wondering if any of you have any advice?
Don't get "The Big Blue Book" as one of your first maintenance and repair books. It's just not that good. Yes, there are very detailed step-by-step processes described for most jobs, but the book doesn't really go into the "why's" and "what for's" that'll help you understand your bike and how its various parts work. The book also only tells you how to do most jobs with very specific Park tools, and doesn't usually mention if there are alternative tools (or non-tools, in a pinch) that you can use (after all, Park's primary interest is selling more of their own tools). Plus, everything in the Park Blue Book is available for free on their web site.

If you're looking for a good maintenance and repair book, the best is "Zinn and the Art of Road/Mountain Bike Repair" (two books, actually---one specifically for mtn bikes, one for road). This should be the first book you buy.

A close second to the Zinn books is "Bicycling Magazines Complete Guide to Bicycle Maintenance and Repair." This one is very similar to the Zinn books but covers both road and mtn bikes in one book, and is therefore not quite as comprehensive (but for all practical purposes, still more than most of us will need). Its advantage over the Zinn books might be that the Bicycling Magazine book uses actual photos rather than just drawings.
__________________
Proud supporter of the Chippewa Off-Road Bike Association (CORBA)
www.chippewaoffroad.org

Peek the Geek is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-14-06, 08:08 AM   #3
curt in denver
Senior Member
 
curt in denver's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2005
Location: Englewood, Colorado
Bikes: Giant Ocr limited (carbon) Redline Conquest (cross)
Posts: 458
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
+1 for Zinn
curt in denver is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-14-06, 08:41 AM   #4
Surferbruce
Senior Member
 
Surferbruce's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2004
Location: Los Angeles/Aveyron France
Bikes:
Posts: 5,308
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
make sure if you get the zinn book you get the latest edition. much more up to date.
i have that and the blue book and find they compliment each other well.
Surferbruce is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-14-06, 08:43 AM   #5
Walkafire
Guest
 
Bikes:
Posts: n/a
Mentioned: Post(s)
Tagged: Thread(s)
Quoted: Post(s)
+1 for Zinn

It is also great for "Wheel Building"
  Reply With Quote
Old 03-14-06, 10:34 AM   #6
Vatn
Sceptical European
 
Join Date: Sep 2005
Location: Norway
Bikes:
Posts: 51
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
So, where's "Zinn and the Art of Hybrid Bike Maintenance"? Or more specifically, which one should I get for my bike: Trek 7.3 FX, disc brakes, no shocks.
Vatn is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-14-06, 10:56 AM   #7
Walkafire
Guest
 
Bikes:
Posts: n/a
Mentioned: Post(s)
Tagged: Thread(s)
Quoted: Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by Vatn
So, where's "Zinn and the Art of Hybrid Bike Maintenance"? Or more specifically, which one should I get for my bike: Trek 7.3 FX, disc brakes, no shocks.

I don't have the (ZINN) book here at work with me, but I do know the "ZINN MTB Book" does go over building wheels with disc brakes. I am not sure if I saw anything on Disc Brake Maint. But I am sure there has to be something on the subject in his book. As mentioned above, make sure you get the "Latest" version of the book...

Good Luck
  Reply With Quote
Old 03-14-06, 11:25 AM   #8
Peek the Geek
is slower than you
 
Peek the Geek's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2005
Location: WI
Bikes: Gunnar Sport, Marin Pine Mountain, Gunnar Ruffian, Gunnar Roadie, BMC Fourstroke, Salsa Vaya
Posts: 1,486
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by Vatn
So, where's "Zinn and the Art of Hybrid Bike Maintenance"? Or more specifically, which one should I get for my bike: Trek 7.3 FX, disc brakes, no shocks.
You could go either way. 95% of the info in each book applies to darn near any type of bike. I guess I'd recommend the mountain bike book because it does cover disc brakes. But any component-specific information that's not in the book can usually be obtained by downloading the user's manual from the manufactuer's web site. For general maintenance, though, this book's got you covered.
__________________
Proud supporter of the Chippewa Off-Road Bike Association (CORBA)
www.chippewaoffroad.org

Peek the Geek is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-14-06, 11:29 AM   #9
Psimet2001 
I eat carbide.
 
Psimet2001's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2006
Location: Elgin, IL
Bikes: Lots. Van Dessel and Squid Dealer
Posts: 19,705
Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1 Post(s)
The Bicycling published one is what I used as a kid to learn because it could be found in most public libraries at the time (you know those buildings with large stacks of paper in them).

Even as a kid it always seemed a little out of date. I recently purchased a recent edition of it and found that many of the pages were the same. I also got Zinn's and have to say that I've read more of Zinn's. Bicycling's has more pictures which can be helpful if you've never done it before. Kudos to Park's site. I have cited it numerous times on this forum. Also Sheldon Brown's pages are unbeatable for clear simple explanations of why things are the way they are. In the end nothing will beat pure wrench time and the web.
Psimet2001 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-28-06, 03:37 PM   #10
mycoatl
Sasquatch Crossing
 
mycoatl's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2005
Location: Portlandia
Bikes:
Posts: 414
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Pardon my ignorance, but what's so different about working on a mt bike and a road bike that they'd require separate manuals?

What would you recommend for folks like me with a road touring bike with a mix of road and mountain components (mt drivetrain, hubs, and canti brakes, road bar ends shifters and aero brakes)?

Thanks.
mycoatl is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-28-06, 03:53 PM   #11
wsexson
LHT Commuter
 
wsexson's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2005
Location: Anaheim, CA
Bikes: Surly Long Haul Trucker & Motobecane Le Champion
Posts: 467
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
mycoatl,

I would recommend Zinn and the Art of Road Bike Maintenance as the more appropriate of the two for your bike.
wsexson is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-28-06, 04:09 PM   #12
Peek the Geek
is slower than you
 
Peek the Geek's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2005
Location: WI
Bikes: Gunnar Sport, Marin Pine Mountain, Gunnar Ruffian, Gunnar Roadie, BMC Fourstroke, Salsa Vaya
Posts: 1,486
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by mycoatl
Pardon my ignorance, but what's so different about working on a mt bike and a road bike that they'd require separate manuals?

What would you recommend for folks like me with a road touring bike with a mix of road and mountain components (mt drivetrain, hubs, and canti brakes, road bar ends shifters and aero brakes)?

Thanks.
They're not really two completely different manuals. Most of each of the Zinn books is the same, while strays from the other by covering different types of brakes, exploring suspension, etc. Drivetrains, hubs, and canti brakes are similar enough that there isn't much difference between the two books in those sections.

In a way, breaking it into two books is nice for someone who only rides road or mountain and doesn't want to dig through a bunch of extra, irrelevant information. And for those who ride both, well they're putting twice as much money into the pockets of Zinn and his publishers. It's a win-win situation.
__________________
Proud supporter of the Chippewa Off-Road Bike Association (CORBA)
www.chippewaoffroad.org

Peek the Geek is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-29-06, 08:59 AM   #13
Japhy
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2006
Bikes:
Posts: 188
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Also take a look at Haynes Guide to Bicycle Maintainence and Repair (or something like that). They make good auto repair manuals as well. There are color photos and step by step instructions...a very good "how" book, but not so good on the "why." I've also heard good things about the Zinn books as well.
Japhy is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-29-06, 11:04 AM   #14
Mentor58
'Mizer Cats are INSANE
 
Mentor58's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2005
Location: Clarksville, TN
Bikes: C-dale T800
Posts: 808
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
I actually prefer the drawings in ZINN to photos, i think they provide the information 'cleaner'. Besides, Zinn has some dry humor in it, like the difference between a 'spline' and a 'spleen'.

Steve W
Mentor58 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-31-06, 10:50 PM   #15
GCG199
Member
 
GCG199's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2005
Location: Manchester, NH
Bikes: Raleigh XXIX 29er SS
Posts: 37
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
The latest version of the Bicycling magazine Bicycle Maintenance & Repair book is the 5th edition authored by Todd Downs. I picked up my copy from Amazon.com for $13.00.

I have the Park Big Blue Book of Bike Repair too. This one is hard to find for less than the retail price though ($25.00).
GCG199 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-31-06, 11:43 PM   #16
Nermal
Senior Member
 
Nermal's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2006
Location: Farmington, NM
Bikes: Giant Cypress SX
Posts: 2,071
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 5 Post(s)
Too right, Mentor. Good drawings show a lot more than good photos.
__________________
Some people are like a Slinky ... not really good for anything, but you still can't help but smile when you shove them down the stairs.
Nermal is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off



All times are GMT -6. The time now is 03:56 AM.