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-   -   Was he doing this on purpose? (http://www.bikeforums.net/general-cycling-discussion/186909-he-doing-purpose.html)

foehn 04-09-06 02:18 PM

Was he doing this on purpose?
 
I was driving home from the store this morning when I saw some guy in full bicycle kit riding up the hill to our house (up Sapphire Street), on some sort of yellow Specialized, front suspension, flat-bar, hard-tail bike, with a seriously almost-flat rear tire, plus the front looked pretty low too. I pulled over to offer him the use of one of the pumps up at our house, but thought that maybe he wanted[she chuckled evilly] the extra workout up the hill, so I let him pass.

Did he actually want to ride the low, low tires for extra work (he was standing and mashing up the hill--skridge, skridge, skridge . . . ). . .

or was he just crazy-stupid?

midgie 04-09-06 02:26 PM

I 'd go with stupid.
Its unbelievable how many people think the air lasts forever(or at least a real long time) in their tires.
I use to see it all the time, and more so, they are completely baffled on how they got a flat.

roadfix 04-09-06 03:20 PM

He knew you were a cyclist so he was doing this near your house just to bug you.

the beef 04-09-06 04:56 PM

Maybe he had a flat?

edp773 04-09-06 05:42 PM

Maybe he was mechanicaly challenged and thought he was that far out of shape. :)

bbwolfy 04-09-06 06:32 PM

I live in a college town and see this all the time . I have even seen a couple with a frame mounted pump!

oilfreeandhappy 04-09-06 10:48 PM

There have been times when I've gotten flats, and they just won't hold air, even with my slime in the tube. Sometimes I'll try to get a mile or so on the partially inflated tire, and it's better to stand up to avoid damaging the rims.

I only do this if I know it's time to replace the tire.

Willks 04-10-06 04:36 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by midgie
I 'd go with stupid.
Its unbelievable how many people think the air lasts forever(or at least a real long time) in their tires.
I use to see it all the time, and more so, they are completely baffled on how they got a flat.

I check my tire pressure every time I go out and ride, or at least every 2 to 3 times. The air does not last long at all.

jeff-o 04-10-06 07:15 AM

Yep, it's a pain trying to keep the tires in my Trek at 100psi. It seems to need a top-up every 2 or 3 days. Good thing I've got 2 pumps at home, and four gas stations on the way to work.

foehn 04-10-06 09:15 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by The Fixer
He knew you were a cyclist so he was doing this near your house just to bug you.

Smart @$$! :)

I thought of something else: maybe he was going to go up some of the fire roads north of our house, didn't have a car to get the bike there and decided to ride on up. hmmm, can't be so as you could always ride up full pressure then release to desired poundage.

I'm thinkin' flat or stupid too. . . But I don't know about the stupid; the bike looked well used (not trashed, though). I mean if your bike is well used, ya gotta know something about tire pressure, no?

skiahh 04-10-06 10:01 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by oilfreeandhappy
it's better to stand up to avoid damaging the rims.

Uhhh... huh?

I'm not a physicist but this just doesn't make any sense to me at all.

The pressure on the tires would be the same whether you were sitting or standing... it's all transmitted through the frame to the contact patch regardless of your position. In fact, standing - at least for mashers like me - lets me put MORE torque on the back tire, so I'd think that standing and mashing would be harder on a low pressure back tire than sitting and attempting to spin nicely.

AndrewP 04-10-06 11:10 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by jeff-o
Yep, it's a pain trying to keep the tires in my Trek at 100psi. It seems to need a top-up every 2 or 3 days.

I used to forget when I last pumped my tires, so now I do it every time before I leave home. It takes longer to remove the caps off the valves than it takes to get the tires up to pressure.

DannoXYZ 04-10-06 04:58 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by skiahh
Quote:

Originally Posted by oilfreeandhappy
it's better to stand up to avoid damaging the rims.

Uhhh... huh?

I'm not a physicist but this just doesn't make any sense to me at all.

The pressure on the tires would be the same whether you were sitting or standing... it's all transmitted through the frame to the contact patch regardless of your position. In fact, standing - at least for mashers like me - lets me put MORE torque on the back tire, so I'd think that standing and mashing would be harder on a low pressure back tire than sitting and attempting to spin nicely.

Sure, the total load on the tyres will be the same regardless of sitting or standing if you're cruising on perfectly flat glass-smooth roads. However there are vertical accelerations when hitting bumps and potholes. The peak G-forces and total load will change depending upon the size of the bump and how you hit them. Standing allows you to bend your knees and "lift" the bike over the bump, thus reducing the peak G-forces and maximum loading on the wheels. Hitting a speed-bump at 20mph while seated can actually load the rims with 800lbs of force! :eek: Standing and absorbing the shock with your arms and legs (letting the bike move up & down while your body is stationary), only loads it up with 300-400lbs. :)

skiahh 04-11-06 07:07 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by DannoXYZ
Sure, the total load on the tyres will be the same regardless of sitting or standing if you're cruising on perfectly flat glass-smooth roads. However there are vertical accelerations when hitting bumps and potholes. The peak G-forces and total load will change depending upon the size of the bump and how you hit them. Standing allows you to bend your knees and "lift" the bike over the bump, thus reducing the peak G-forces and maximum loading on the wheels. Hitting a speed-bump at 20mph while seated can actually load the rims with 800lbs of force! :eek: Standing and absorbing the shock with your arms and legs (letting the bike move up & down while your body is stationary), only loads it up with 300-400lbs. :)

Hmmm... good point. Hadn't thought of the "shock absorber" ability of our joints (and as a skier, I know it well!).

Still standing on the pedals while slowly grinding uphill doesn't leave much ability to flex and absorb. At least the way I climb hills! :D

barba 04-11-06 07:13 AM

I see lots of people on flat tires. I think it is a combination of two things.

1: People think that air lasts forever. It just doesn't occur to them that you loose it even without a leak. Check out car tires. It seems to be universal in human-round rubber object relations.

2: A surprising number of cyclists do not know how to change a tube or fix a flat, let alone carry the minimal gear needed to do it. I have given away numerous tubes and loaned a pump more times than I can count to people.

operator 04-11-06 12:51 PM

That be lose anyways. You can't loose air unless you're farting.

TexasGuy 04-11-06 01:06 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by operator
That be lose anyways. You can't loose air unless you're farting.

scottogo posing as operator?

hairy rider 04-11-06 01:26 PM

=

Quote:

Originally Posted by barba
I see lots of people on flat tires. I think it is a combination of two things.

1: People think that air lasts forever. It just doesn't occur to them that you loose it even without a leak. Check out car tires. It seems to be universal in human-round rubber object relations.

2: A surprising number of cyclists do not know how to change a tube or fix a flat, let alone carry the minimal gear needed to do it. I have given away numerous tubes and loaned a pump more times than I can count to people.


:eek: This reminds me about a time I went on a ride with my dad and his friend who had just bought a road bike about a month ago. As we were leaving I let my dads friend know his tires were near flat... He looked puzzled and said he had just pumped them up before we showed up. So he pulls out his floor pump and puts the nozzle over the presta valve w/o unscrewing the top of the valve and starts to push the pump , looks back to me and says 'see, its full... no air will go in...' ... :o lol. On top of that all he carried with him on rides was his cell phone...

Eggplant Jeff 04-11-06 01:29 PM

Actually here's another one of those "huh?" moments... I was on my way home the other day and saw a roadie-looking fellow, complete kit, except riding a big ol' knobbed-tire full-suspension mountain bike. On the road. I guess either he was training or maybe he was on his way to/from a trail... But it really looked incongruous.

DataJunkie 04-11-06 02:24 PM

LOL! I was puzzled this morning when I passed not one but two full kit wearing cyclists on MTBs. At least I am not the only one :p

stapfam 04-11-06 02:54 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by DataJunkie
LOL! I was puzzled this morning when I passed not one but two full kit wearing cyclists on MTBs. At least I am not the only one :p

Enroute to some Gnarly offroading perhaps? My trails do not start at my front door.

Peek the Geek 04-12-06 03:32 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by foehn
I was driving home from the store this morning when I saw some guy in full bicycle kit riding up the hill to our house (up Sapphire Street), on some sort of yellow Specialized, front suspension, flat-bar, hard-tail bike, with a seriously almost-flat rear tire, plus the front looked pretty low too. I pulled over to offer him the use of one of the pumps up at our house, but thought that maybe he wanted[she chuckled evilly] the extra workout up the hill, so I let him pass.

Did he actually want to ride the low, low tires for extra work (he was standing and mashing up the hill--skridge, skridge, skridge . . . ). . .

or was he just crazy-stupid?

Any chance he was riding his mountain bike to or from some mountain bike trails?

foehn 04-12-06 03:48 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Peek the Geek
Any chance he was riding his mountain bike to or from some mountain bike trails?

Actually I thought of that, since up at the top of Sapphire is the start of fire road(s) that wind up into the mountains above a canyon and creek between Alta Loma and Upland.

But, jeeze, I'd pump my tires up for the street climb and then let air out for traction off the pavement. His back tire was really low, so low that you could see it get lower everytime he put weight into the down strokes of his cadence.

Quote:

Originally Posted by Eggplant Jeff
... I was on my way home the other day and saw a roadie-looking fellow, complete kit, except riding a big ol' knobbed-tire full-suspension mountain bike. On the road. . . .

This is how the guy I saw looked--full roadie kit, on a mountain-style bike.. . with flat tires.

DataJunkie 04-12-06 06:07 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by stapfam
Enroute to some Gnarly offroading perhaps? My trails do not start at my front door.

Most mountain bikers I know dress a wee bit differently than a roadie. They were also in central denver fairly far from any trails. *shrugs* Not a big deal. Just thought it was odd.

Nachoman 04-12-06 09:18 PM

Everytime I see someone riding around with flat tires. too low of a seat, or a helmet tilted in the wrong position I feel like saying something. But I don't. :p


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