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  1. #1
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    Clipless Pedals - Single or Double Sided?

    Making the transition to clipless and have read many posts on this forum. A single sided pedal (SPD) with a platform on on side (Shimano A-520) has the advantage of being able to be used with either clipless or regular shoes. Some posters indicate that it is harder with these single side to clip in since the clip side may not alway be upwards. Shimano also makes many double side SPD pedals but then of course you sacrifice the ability to use with plain shoes.

    Overall for a beginner getting use to clipless what's the best approach, single or double sided pedals?

  2. #2
    Behind EVERYone!!! baj32161's Avatar
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    I went with the double sided pedas and just took it slow learning to use them. I didn't ride in traffic until I felt relatively secure in my ability to get out of them. Your LBS should let you try them out on a trainer to get somewhat used to the feel of them. Having said that, my LBS also toosed me a set of removeable platforme to put on my SPDs in case I want to use regular shoes or let someone else ride my bike.

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  3. #3
    Prefers Cicero cooker's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by foxden
    Making the transition to clipless and have read many posts on this forum. A single sided pedal (SPD) with a platform on on side (Shimano A-520) has the advantage of being able to be used with either clipless or regular shoes. Some posters indicate that it is harder with these single side to clip in since the clip side may not alway be upwards. Shimano also makes many double side SPD pedals but then of course you sacrifice the ability to use with plain shoes.

    Overall for a beginner getting use to clipless what's the best approach, single or double sided pedals?
    The A-520 doesn't work with ordinary shoes. You'd easily slip off it. I think it's one sided just to make it light. I believe there are some pedals that are platform on one side and clipless on the other - I'll look for a link or someone else may be able to post one; or, you can buy a flat platform adaptor that can clip into the pedals when you need to use them like platforms.

    (EDIT: see post #5).
    Last edited by cooker; 04-12-06 at 09:48 PM.

  4. #4
    DEADBEEF khuon's Avatar
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    I'm a big fan of double-sided pedals. And if you want to use regular street shoes then there's a couple of clip-in adapter solutions such as the Winwood Decksters or Instep.



    The disadvantage double-sided pedals with these adapters have compared to some single-sided pedals is that high-quality single-sided pedals such as Looks are often weighted to face right-side-up. Note that the Winwood Instep is available for Look pedals as well.
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  5. #5
    Prefers Cicero cooker's Avatar
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    The Shimano M324 combines clipless and platform.

  6. #6
    DEADBEEF khuon's Avatar
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    Another option would be to go with a combined clipless platform solution such as the Time ATAC Z-Control or Crank Brothers Mallet C.



    The downside to these pedals is that they're relatively heavy and the clipless bindings do stick up above the platform so they're not totally unobtrusive for pure street shoes. There is one pedal called the Quickstep from Atom Labs that claims to have a lower strength spring on the bindings thus the claws retract with less force so should be more comfortable to use with regular shoes.



    All these pedals are in the $100 - $120 pricerange.
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  7. #7
    Senior Member Nachoman's Avatar
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    I bought the type for my hybrid that have a platform adapter, but i've only installed the adapter a few times when friends without spd shoes wanted to borrow my bike.
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  8. #8
    Seņior Member ItsJustMe's Avatar
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    I just picked up some double-sided SPD pedals on eBay for $20 and started riding.
    I didn't like not being able to use regular shoes, so I put my platforms and clips back on this spring. I want to be able to just jump on and ride without having to go inside and change shoes. Also sometimes my daughter wants to ride to someones house after dark, so I like to be able to drop the seat on the commuter a bit and let her ride the bike with full lights.

    I may see if I can get some of those clip-in platform adaptors. I really want to be able to use regular shoes sometimes, and I am not really all that in love with SPDs, but they are kind of nice.

  9. #9
    totally louche Bekologist's Avatar
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    the Shimano 324's is their only pedal that comes with a multidirectional release cleat standard, which makes the 324 an excellent transition pedal for riders just starting to use clipless, add versatility for riders who will ride often in street shoes, and may provide an advantage to the less abled riders out there in traffic and start and stop city riding, by providing a solid platform to use without having to get 'clipped in' right off the traffic signals.

    The A520 is a 105 level polished, single sided 'road' pedal that uses Shimanos compact mountain cleat. Great for club riders that want off the bike walkability
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  10. #10
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    I vote for quad side pedals. However, I am not concerned with riding in normal shoes. I found eggbeaters to be very easy to clip in and out of.

  11. #11
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    Both my trek 7500fx and trike came with single-sided clipless pedals. In both cases, the cleat side ends up facing downwards. On the trike it's not a problem, but on the Trek it's frustrating trying to clip in the second shoe... For that reason, I'd recommend one of the platform pedals with clipless entry on both sides.
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  12. #12
    Senior Member barba's Avatar
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    Another vote for eggbeaters. Get a good pair of cycling shoes that you can walk in. I would bet that within weeks you won't be able to imagine riding without being clipped in. I am addicted to the ability to pull the crank arm up with my foot to get a faster start out of a stop light.

    This summer I want to try those SPD sandals I have seen. That would be nice for leisurely rides.

  13. #13
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    I have the single sided pedals. I just flip the pedals and clip in if I clip out and the clipless rotates to the underside. It's not that difficult to pick up.

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  14. #14
    45 miles/week Eggplant Jeff's Avatar
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    Performance Campus pedals are relatively inexpensive, clipless one side, decent platforms the other. It's 100% true that whatever shoes you're wearing, the wrong side of the pedal will be up , but after a day or two you get used to flipping them over with your foot as you get going.
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  15. #15
    Chairman of the Bored catatonic's Avatar
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    I also reccomend eggbeaters. Fantastic pedals...I really should have bought them sooner.

    Plus you can get them as cheap as $50 online.

    Best aprt with beaters....4-sided entry...never have to worry about the pedal being at the wrong point of rotation. Plus the cleats have no front/back...you have to pick which is left and which is right though to determine your release angles.

    Seriously...I have went fom Shimano M-505s, VP-101, back to M-505, to Ritchey V4pro, to eggbeaters....and the eggbeaters win, hands down.
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  16. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by Eggplant Jeff
    Performance Campus pedals are relatively inexpensive, clipless one side, decent platforms the other. It's 100% true that whatever shoes you're wearing, the wrong side of the pedal will be up , but after a day or two you get used to flipping them over with your foot as you get going.
    When I first bought my road bike a few years ago I got the Campus pedals. After a year or two I "graduated" to double sided. Now I am back to the original Campus pedals. I think it is absurd if I can't just jump on my bike and ride with regular shoes. That's just me.

    It is 100% true about the wrong side being up. You get used to flipping the pedal around.

  17. #17
    Sensible shoes. CastIron's Avatar
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    Shimano M-424's are double sided with a resin cage around 'em. They are on my commuter and work pretty damn well. Not too expensive, either.
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  18. #18
    Senior Member DieselDan's Avatar
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    If you really want to get serious and go clipless, then get double sided, or four sided, pedals and shoes. Stick with it, and you'll never ever want to use platforms again. If changing shoes is too much of a hassle for you, then reevaluate your personal cycling program.
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  19. #19
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    Eggbeaters here, even on my folder.

  20. #20
    Senior Member eric von zipper's Avatar
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    crank bro eggbeater on 2 bikes, crank bro candies on the 3rd. there are enough shoes made today that look like normal/everyday shoes and are spd compat. i hardly wear shoes w/0 cleats.
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  21. #21
    100% USDA certified the beef's Avatar
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    Go with the Shimano M324s. I bought a pair from my LBS for $60 a month ago - they rock. The pedals are weighted so that the SPD connector hangs facing towards you - so starting up is not a problem. These are a really good value - and I think you can find a short review on them in this months' Bicycling mag as well.


  22. #22
    Packfodding 3 caloso's Avatar
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    For my commuter, I got some double sided Ritchey MTB pedals. (You can find these cheap online all the time.) Just stomp and go.

    For my go-fast bike, I've got Ultegra pedals. They take a little getting used to with the flip-and-clip motion. But interestingly enough, they have such a big surface that you can ride them as platforms with running or soccer shoes very comfortably:



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  23. #23
    Unique Vintage Steel cuda2k's Avatar
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    I would suggest one of the Shimano platform/spd or a Shimano double sided pedal (M520's can be had on ebay for $30). The quad-sided crankbrothers also come very highly praised from many. Notice I said Shimano or Crank Brothers. For your first pair of pedals, do your self the favor and go name brand. I had Wellgo/Performance/Nashbar pedals as my first clipless and now looking back wish I'd spent the money on my M540 double sided SPD's off the bat. Would have been a lot smoother learning and going early on if I had.

  24. #24
    Da Big Kahuna
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    Quote Originally Posted by the beef
    Go with the Shimano M324s. I bought a pair from my LBS for $60 a month ago - they rock. The pedals are weighted so that the SPD connector hangs facing towards you - so starting up is not a problem. These are a really good value - and I think you can find a short review on them in this months' Bicycling mag as well.
    Hmmm, I was going to post about an approach that you may be describing, if I understand you correctly.

    I used double sided on my first bike and, frankly, got irritated at trying to get the right side up each time. Part of this was because either side might be "up" so you couldn't be sure how to flip them and I also found it tricky to get them flipped anyway.

    So, I figured there would be two better approaches. One I've seen described here about some pedals - they are weighted so the same side always faces up. Well, that solves the problem of knowing how they are set but leaves you with the need to flip them.

    The other way is what you may be describing - they are weighted so they are roughly vertical. If you want the clip-in side, you could easily nudge the top of the pedal forward, letting you easily snap into the clips. If you want the platform, you could drag the top part of the pedal back with the center of your foot, letting the rest of it nicely drop into position.

    At least it seems like it would work. I've never had a pair designed like this to actually test.

  25. #25
    Sprockette wabbit's Avatar
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    i started on double sided pedals, and still have them for my cross bike. I think they're good for getting used to clipless. Some people stay with them, but I wanted road pedals for my road bike.
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