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Thread: New Bike

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    Junior Member ragnarok5987's Avatar
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    New Bike

    Hey guys, I'm just planning on getting a new bike. btw, i'm not really a cyclist who knows about different types of bikes n rides on $300+ bikes, just an average joe. my budget is around $100-$150, n im kinda deciding between ccm, supercycle, n huffy tundra bikes. ive read some bad reviews about these brands, but then again, they were being compared to $500+ bikes. so how would u guys comment on this? oh yes, how much does it usually cost for the seat suspension maintainance? thanx

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    Sensible shoes. CastIron's Avatar
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    Any bike kept properly adjusted and maintained will serve you reasonably well. The ones you're looking at are likely pretty much the same. I'd suggest getting one with the LEAST number of suspension gizmos (preferably ZERO). Simplicity is in your favor. All that being said, I'd look towards used. You'll probably get a better bike at the end of the day.
    Mike
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    Junior Member ragnarok5987's Avatar
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    but wat would be disadvantageous for me getting a bike with dual suspension though? i mean they look more comfortable

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    Quote Originally Posted by ragnarok5987
    but wat would be disadvantageous for me getting a bike with dual suspension though? i mean they look more comfortable
    new bikes in the price range you're looking at are absolutely bottom-of-the-barrel quality-wise. they are designed to look good on store shelves, not to be ridden. the suspension parts on them break very easily, are extremely heavy, and wind up providing very little cushioning power at all. most people who buy bikes of this type ride them very little, if at all - because they aren't very much fun to ride.


    if your budget is firm, a used bike is unquestionably the way to go. for $150, you should be able to pick up a mountain bike that cost somebody $500 a few years ago - and a $500 bike is at least ten times better than a $100 bike in terms of light weight, comfort, and durability.

    for $100, you will easily be able to find a road or touring bike 15-30 years old which was built out of excellent parts and will probably outlive your children.

    where do you live? I would be happy to look at craigslist ads in your area to give you some ideas of what might be up your alley... also, what type of riding do you plan to do?


    also, you're lucky you wound up here! there is a wealth of knowledge - thousands of years of experience when you put us all together. i'd like to warn you, though, that many people here (myself included) wouldn't hesitate to spend more - sometimes much, much more - than $1,000 on a bike - and some of them won't be able to give you helpful advice, and may even tell you that there's no way to get a good bike with your budget. it's not true - you'll be able to find something great, as long as you pay attention to the advice you get.

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    Quote Originally Posted by ragnarok5987
    Hey guys, I'm just planning on getting a new bike. btw, i'm not really a cyclist who knows about different types of bikes n rides on $300+ bikes, just an average joe. my budget is around $100-$150, n im kinda deciding between ccm, supercycle, n huffy tundra bikes. ive read some bad reviews about these brands, but then again, they were being compared to $500+ bikes. so how would u guys comment on this? oh yes, how much does it usually cost for the seat suspension maintainance? thanx
    Sometimes it is difficult to tell whether a post is from an actual "newbie", or is being posted by one of the regular Forum members for laughs. And, frankly, a $100 "dual suspension" bike is good only for laughs. It will weigh about 40 pounds. It will use gear changers, brake calipers, and other components that are NOT stocked by any bike store. They are designed to give a kid for Christmas, with the idea he will get a new bike next Christmas. Photography has throw-away cameras. And these are throw-away bikes.

    The cheapest "brand new" bike that you should consider if you plan to do any significant amount of riding is an entry level mountain bike from Trek, Giant, or Specialized. These bikes have lists prices of around $250, but many bike shops do promotions several times a year where such bikes are sold for $199.

    "Name brand" mountain bikes are designed and engineered to take abuse. They are assembled by techs at the local bike shop. They have a factory warranty that protects you against any defects. The parts are standard parts, available at any good bike shop. Such a bike can give you ten years of good service, versus the ten weeks of not-so-good service you might get from a $100 bike.

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    Junior Member ragnarok5987's Avatar
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    thanx guys, and hey, im still a university student who only works once a week with almost minimum wage, so that's all the income that i have, so i'll have to stick with cheap bikes. I live in toronto and i'm planning on using it to commute to campus and work for the summer and fall. the round trip is around 5 miles. i appreciate ur warning though ZachS

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    Quote Originally Posted by ragnarok5987
    thanx guys, and hey, im still a university student who only works once a week with almost minimum wage, so that's all the income that i have, so i'll have to stick with cheap bikes. I live in toronto and i'm planning on using it to commute to campus and work for the summer and fall. the round trip is around 5 miles. i appreciate ur warning though ZachS
    Buy a quality used bike then, one that's been maintained, or else one that's hardly been ridden.

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    Quote Originally Posted by ragnarok5987
    thanx guys, and hey, im still a university student who only works once a week with almost minimum wage, so that's all the income that i have, so i'll have to stick with cheap bikes. I live in toronto and i'm planning on using it to commute to campus and work for the summer and fall. the round trip is around 5 miles. i appreciate ur warning though ZachS
    you're welcome!

    If you're in a big city like toronto, there is no reason whatsoever to get one of those bikes you're looking at... and as bad as those cheap FS (full suspension) bikes are off-road, they're even worse for commuting. you might want to think about not getting a mountain bike at all... they need a lot of modifications before they're really suitable for commuting.

    here are some better bikes i found in a few minutes on craigslist:

    http://toronto.craigslist.org/bik/152232775.html
    http://toronto.craigslist.org/bik/152165728.html
    http://toronto.craigslist.org/bik/152057997.html
    http://toronto.craigslist.org/bik/151993641.html <-------- a VERY good one
    http://toronto.craigslist.org/bik/151985246.html
    http://toronto.craigslist.org/bik/151811590.html
    http://toronto.craigslist.org/bik/151718534.html
    .
    .
    .

    anyway, you get the idea. if you're willing to wait a little while, and have other places to look, you'll be able to get a better deal than those.

    what I would REALLY recommend is posting in THIS THREAD and asking the locals for help... you might end up with a bike very different than what you think you want now, but they could definitely help you find something good within your budget that would be perfect for getting to campus and back.

    Zach

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    Shiftless bum cavit8's Avatar
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    Let's use the word "inexpensive bike" rather than cheap bike.

    Dual suspension = crack head theft magnet
    Shiny POS from Canadian tire (e.g. Supercycle) = crack head theft magnet
    For instance, http://toronto.craigslist.org/bik/152402868.html = crap. Stay away.
    Inexpensive and cheap

    Inexpensive and great
    Older well loved unobtrusive bike= Candy
    Zachs has some links to some of the recent ones:
    http://toronto.craigslist.org/bik/152057997.html for example or
    http://toronto.craigslist.org/bik/151993641.html which is pushing your price range but I agree with Zachs; good option.

    Apart from the craigslist bikes Zachs posted, Community Bike Network is having a bike swap on Sunday morning at MEC (400 King West). I'm not sure what there'll be for complete bikes, but it may be an option. Used bikes in shops are few and far between. Sportswap at Yonge and Eglinton'ish have some, and while you may luck out, a used bike from a shop will be pushing your price range. Stay away from places like Uncle Jacobs on Spadina Option 2. Find out when the garbage days are and wander around looking for discarded bikes.

    I'll be on the early shift at the bike swap likely wearing a garish jersey, shants and cycling sandals (Cam=me) or pm me if you have a question.

    Whatever you decide to do, buy a good lock. A good lock. A good lock. Repetition is the father of all learning. In Toronto your bike will get ripped before you know it. Never leave it outside, more than one lock if possible, remove all quick release components, lock it next to shiny new bikes with crappy locks.

    Or, depending on your route and needs, consider bike share http://tinyurl.com/rxagd

    yo
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    truneo that tuned park internal nipple wrench work ??

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    Junior Member ragnarok5987's Avatar
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    so for commuting, its better not to get mountain bikes and stick with ones that has light weight frames n think wheels, wat's the correct terminology for them neway? is it easier/faster riding on them than the ones i wanted to get? n how is it "more fun" to ride on those better bikes u suggested?

    Edit: oh yes, where can i find good locks in toronto? i mean, i dont think the ones in walmart or canadian tires will do. and wat are their price ranges? thanx again
    Last edited by ragnarok5987; 04-18-06 at 10:10 PM.

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    Quote Originally Posted by ragnarok5987
    so for commuting, its better not to get mountain bikes and stick with ones that has light weight frames n think wheels, wat's the correct terminology for them neway? is it easier/faster riding on them than the ones i wanted to get? n how is it "more fun" to ride on those better bikes u suggested?
    that's correct - the usual terminology for the other kind of bikes is 'road bikes,' but they have a lot of different subclasses and variations.

    it is easier and faster to ride on them, which is what makes them more fun. unless you like riding down stairs and jumping off stuff, in which case they are less fun.

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    Quote Originally Posted by ragnarok5987
    Edit: oh yes, where can i find good locks in toronto? i mean, i dont think the ones in walmart or canadian tires will do. and wat are their price ranges? thanx again
    Read this thread

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    Shiftless bum cavit8's Avatar
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    Nothing wrong with mountain bikes per se, it's the ones that are more eye candy oriented with cheap ass front and rear shocks. As pointed out previously, they a) won't last b) have crappy components that are pretty much disposable c) often come with wannabe offroad tires that suck for the street.

    The sort of hybrid commuter bike gives you the best of both worlds - comfortable body position via the geometry, narrower tires, larger diameter wheels (in some cases) and gearing more appropriate for street riding than full on off road gearing. For example, both http://toronto.craigslist.org/bik/152057997.html or http://toronto.craigslist.org/bik/151993641.html are hybrids. The one has drop bars on but could be fitted for straight bars. Short answer: more comfortable body position, faster bike, more bang for the buck in terms of parts than the dual suspension bike you had in mind., Perhaps less theft appeal, although bike thieves aren't that discriminating in my experience.

    good locks: In the U of T area, Urbane Cyclist http://www.ucycle.com, Bikes on Wheels http://bikesonwheels.ca/ are two off the top of my head. Check TBN's listing for something close to home if those don't suit http://tbn.ca/retailer/rtdb/at.htm

    Expect to pay around $60-80 minimum for a half decent lock.
    Quote Originally Posted by operator
    truneo that tuned park internal nipple wrench work ??

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    Junior Member ragnarok5987's Avatar
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    icic, wat do u guys think about the raleigh bikes though? or r they just as bad? oh yeah, forgive me for this question, but wat does 21 speed or 18 speed mean?

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    Quote Originally Posted by ragnarok5987
    but wat does 21 speed or 18 speed mean?
    21 gear combinations (or 18 gear combinations). Some of these combinations will be identical, so you won't really have 21 different combinations. What you will have is 3 chainrings up front, and 6 or 7 sprockets on the rear wheel, and 3 times 7 gives you a 21 speed. You'll have less than 21 unique combinations, but you will have a useful range of gears for different conditions-- for example, low gears for going uphill, and higher gears for flat ground.

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    Quote Originally Posted by ragnarok5987
    icic, wat do u guys think about the raleigh bikes though? or r they just as bad? oh yeah, forgive me for this question, but wat does 21 speed or 18 speed mean?
    raleigh has been in business for a billion years and has sold bikes ranging from close to the bottom end of the market to very expensive and specialized race machines. a low-end raleigh probably will be at least marginally better than most of the ones you listed, but I'd have to see more information to tell you for sure.

    21 speed = 3 chainrings ('gears') in the front, and 7 cogs in the back

    18 speed = 3 chainrings in the front, and 6 cogs in the back.

    I'm pretty sure that toronto's a flat city, so all you really need is 1 speed.

    some examples of 1 speed bikes: http://www.fixedgeargallery.com/

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    Senior Member jet sanchEz's Avatar
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    The best place to get a decent and cheap lock in Toronto is at Mountain Equipment Co-op, which is at King and Spadina.

    The best place to get a decent and cheap bike in Toronto is either Craigslist or Value Village. How tall are you? I have a great Concorde road bike that isn't seeing much use lately but it would only fit a person 6'1 or taller. If that is too big for you, I can keep an eye out at the VV for a nice ride for you....I have hooked up almost 10 of my friends with good bikes through VV and the most expensive was $40. Let me know your height and what you are looking for.

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    Quote Originally Posted by ZachS
    some examples of 1 speed bikes: http://www.fixedgeargallery.com/
    Fixed gear (as distinct from single speed) is a poor choice for a beginner, though. He should go with either a single speed, or a multi-speed, but not a fixed gear. Personally, I think a multi-speed bike is far more suitable for a beginner.

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    Junior Member ragnarok5987's Avatar
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    im not a tall person; 5'7 and thanx for keeping a look out for me

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    Quote Originally Posted by Blue Order
    Fixed gear (as distinct from single speed) is a poor choice for a beginner, though. He should go with either a single speed, or a multi-speed, but not a fixed gear. Personally, I think a multi-speed bike is far more suitable for a beginner.
    and you would be wrong. they're all equally sutiable. riding a fixed gear is not like flying a helicopter or something like that, for god's sake.

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    The Improbable Bulk Little Darwin's Avatar
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    I just want to throw in another vote against the cheap department store mountain bikes... and for a used bike.

    In my area, most bikes I see are the type that you asked about. They are usually being ridden very slowly on flats and down hills or pushed up hills.

    The hills they are being pushed up are the hills that I ride up without too much trouble, and I weigh over 300 pounds.

    So the bottom line is if you want to ride the bike on the road, don't worry about getting a bike that pretends to be able to ride through the wooded mountainside... get one that is meant for the type of riding you will do, and it will serve the purpose much better.

    Even if the full suspension mountain bike was entry level quality for real off road riding, you should know that the energy absorbed by the suspension is sometimes YOUR energy, and therefore means that less energy is used to move you forward. They are also heavy... A double detriment for road riding... Less efficiency and more weight.
    Slow Ride Cyclists of NEPA

    People do not seem to realize that their opinion of the world is also a confession of character.
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    Quote Originally Posted by ZachS
    and you would be wrong. they're all equally sutiable.
    But not equally easy to ride.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Blue Order
    But not equally easy to ride.
    but all easy enough for an average, or even below-average adult, especially in a flat area. if the OP was mentally or physically disabled (and the jury may still be out on the former), I'd agree with you, but....

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    From Sheldon Brown, who sings the praises of fixed gears:

    "Fixed gear dangers:

    I should warn you that there are three dangers related to fixed-gear bicycles that are not a problem with freewheel bicycles. Used and maintained properly, fixed gear bicycles can be as safe as any, but you should be aware of the three danger areas:


    Pedal Strike

    It is never a good thing to strike your pedal on the ground while cornering tightly. On a freewheel bike, you can coast though the corners with your pedals horizontal, thus avoiding any chance of striking. On a fixed-gear machine, you don't have this option.

    If you do bang a pedal on a fixed gear, the pedal can lift the rear wheel off the road, and down you will go. This has never happened to me, but it is something to bear in mind.

    How much of a problem this is will depend on your bottom bracket height, crank length, and the design of your pedals.

    Most of my fixed-gear bikes have 165 mm cranks,which give a bit more ground clearance than the 170 mm's usually used on road bikes. I also make a point of using pedals that don't stick out too far.


    Derailment and Wheel Lock

    Throwing a chain on a freewheel bike is no big deal, but it can be very dangerous on with a fixed gear. If the chain comes off of the chainwheel, it can get hung up or even loop around the rear sprocket, and can cause the wheel to lock up. If this happens while you are leaned over in a turn, you will almost certainly crash.

    This is prevented by making sure that your chainline is straight, and that your chain is adequately tight.



    Catching Fingers, Trousers, Shoelaces

    The other danger of fixed-gear bicycles is at its greatest when the bike is in a repair stand. If you hand-pedal it and then accidentally have a finger an article of clothing come into contact with the chain or a sprocket, the momentum of the wheel will keep the drive train rolling. You can lose a finger that way."



    I would argue that because geared or single speed bikes don't have these problems, those bikes are easier for a beginner to ride, and thus, more suitable for beginners.

  25. #25
    Cycle Dallas MMACH 5's Avatar
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    My '89 Raleigh road bike is the smoothest bike I own, in terms of riding and shifting. As mentioned above, there is a huge range of quality amongst the Raleigh line of bicycles.

    The best thing I did, soon after I started cycling, was a complete tear-down and build up of my bike, (I painted the frame, while I was at it). In one weekend, I learned more about how everything works and needs to be maintained than I would have from months of reading about it. I would recomend this to any beginner who is at all mechanically inclined and has a few days to spare.
    That's gonna leave a mark.

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