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  1. #1
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    What do you do if...

    Hi. This is my first post, but I have been reading and learning for awhile now. I purchased a Giant Sedona comfort bike for riding on bike paths pulling my kids in a Burley D'Lite about a month ago. We are finding that we enjoy it far more than we expected!
    I have started riding on the shop rides and even attempted a "Novice" road ride last week. The shop has been unbelievably helpful.
    My problem is that I am wanting to try a different bike that this shop does not sell. I am finding that I am not off of trails at all and would like something a little more road-friendly. I don't think I will be off-road enough to need the mountain style comfort. Yet, I won't be doing a whole lot of serious road riding since I don't want to take the kids on the road. Mostly, I want to take 12-20 mile trips through the neighborhood and on the bike paths in the neighboring town and then do the novice road ride with the group once a week (24 miles). Eventually, I may want to try something longer like a charity ride, but I am quite overweight from having the two kids and need to work on shedding that.
    I have ridden a Trek 7.5 FX and absolutely loved it! The mountain frame and gearing seem perfect for the bike paths and the granny gear looks good for helping me get up the hills. The skinny 700c tires roll so well on the road! The competitor store carries it, but since I am doing the rides through the other shop and they have been so helpful, I have not been able to bring myself to order one. What have you done in this situation?
    Thanks!

  2. #2
    pointless & uncalled for
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    My suggestion would be to see of the LBS can tighten up the suspension a bit, stick some bar ends and road tires (no knobbles) on there and see how you feel about having the Sedona as a road rider. If you like that then consider getting your handlebars trimmed and a slightly harder saddle.

    I've done road style riding on a Giant Rock SE and not had a problem turning over 18-20mph. If you find yourself running out of gears, ask about changing your front set to something a little bigger.

  3. #3
    your nightmare gal chipcom's Avatar
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    Can you tell us what brands your preferred LBS carries? The Trek is a good bike, but other manufacturers have similar bikes, including Giant and their FCR series flat-barred road bikes.
    "Let us hope our weapons are never needed --but do not forget what the common people knew when they demanded the Bill of Rights: An armed citizenry is the first defense, the best defense, and the final defense against tyranny. If guns are outlawed, only the government will have guns. Only the police, the secret police, the military, the hired servants of our rulers. Only the government -- and a few outlaws. I intend to be among the outlaws" - Edward Abbey

  4. #4
    The Improbable Bulk Little Darwin's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by chipcom
    Can you tell us what brands your preferred LBS carries? The Trek is a good bike, but other manufacturers have similar bikes, including Giant and their FCR series flat-barred road bikes.
    +1

    If you do feel like you should be loyal to this shop, and they sell Giants (assumption since you are riding a Sedona) you do have options.

    You can go with the FCR, or there is a step in between, and that is the Cypress. The Cypress is generally the same as the Sedona except it has road type tires and 700x40c tires.

    My guess is that for what you wan would be the FCR (perhaps the FCR-3) with its 700x28c tires you should be able to cruise on the road pretty well.

    Personally, I would bypass the Cypress and look at the FCR just so that you have a little more difference between your two bikes, it makes the expenditure seem more reasonable in my mind.
    Slow Ride Cyclists of NEPA

    People do not seem to realize that their opinion of the world is also a confession of character.
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  5. #5
    The Improbable Bulk Little Darwin's Avatar
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    One other note. If you really do prefer a bike that your LBS doesn't carry, get what you want, it is your money. If your ride leaders etc give you grief, then perhjaps you should switch anyway... But do take the opportunity to see if any razzing you is good natured.

    If my LBS had a novice group, I would ride with them, and I have never bought a bike there.
    Slow Ride Cyclists of NEPA

    People do not seem to realize that their opinion of the world is also a confession of character.
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  6. #6
    Jet Jockey Banzai's Avatar
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    Have you asked this particular store if you can see their catalog? Or, have you checked Giant's webpage. Most bike manufacturers offer models that are close analogs of each other to some degree, meaning that I'm certain Giant (or any other make your LBS carries) offers something very nearly the same to the Trek you so liked.
    But, in the end, get the bike that's best for you. That's what really matters if you plan on putting serious miles on this.
    Good night...and good luck

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    Thanks for all of the responses guys. I like the FCR, too, but thought that the Trek might be better on the bike paths and on hills. I was thinking that if it more closely resembles a MTB frame, it would be more rugged and be able to handle the paths and the kids trailer better. The paths are paved, but have roots and a few potholes and stuff. Nothing serious, but a little bumpy. Also, wouldn't the MTB gearing have a lower gear? I am pretty out of shape and have to put it in the granny gear on the Sedona to get up some of the steeper hills with the trailer.
    I am not trying to be antagonistic, I just don't really know much...especially when it comes to the gearing.

  8. #8
    Prefers Cicero cooker's Avatar
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    I agree with what others have said. From browsing both the Trek and Giant websites, it seems manufacturers have started to separate hybrids into "comfort" and "fitness" subtypes. The comfort bikes are for more leisurely riding and the fitness bikes are speedier. So the FCR line of bikes from Giant may correspond somewhat to the 7.x FX line of Treks. However, Trek has a WSD option (Woman specific design) that might fit you better than a man's bike. Women tend to have longer legs relative to arms and torso, so the forward reach is a bit shorter on a WSD bike, and I don't know if Giant offers that.

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    Prefers Cicero cooker's Avatar
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    You're right that the Trek has better low gears: 26/32 (front/back cog teeth) on the FX vs 30/26 on the FCR. I imagine that will make a big difference towing the brats uphill. However, you might be able to ask the Giant dealer if they can swap the gears for better ones for your situation/

    (EDIT) The Giant Cypress DX ladies version gets close to the Trek in gearing: 28/32.

  10. #10
    Huachuca Rider webist's Avatar
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    Sounds a bit like the shop rivalry in my town. Specialized/Giant vs Trek/Schwinn.
    Just Peddlin' Around

  11. #11
    On Two Wheels sam83's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by cooker
    You're right that the Trek has better low gears: 26/32 (front/back cog teeth) on the FX vs 30/26 on the FCR. I imagine that will make a big difference towing the brats uphill. However, you might be able to ask the Giant dealer if they can swap the gears for better ones for your situation.
    +1

    I suggested the same to a friend of mine who bought a FCR. The dealer put on an 11/32 cassette and appropriate rear derailleur, no charge. That's pretty simple and I've found that a good LBS will do that sort of thing.

    Still not enough? Ask the folks at the LBS what else they can do?

  12. #12
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    Cool...that sounds like a good solution. I really do want to support the shop that has been so helpful. How do the components on the Giant FCR compare? I am not yet familiar with all of the different names to be able to compare quality.
    The specs can be found here:
    http://www.giantforwomen.com/index.p...=BIKE%20FINDER
    Thanks.

  13. #13
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    How do you know that the Trek dealer wouldn't be just as helpful? It seems that you've given a fair bit of business to one shop, but I don't see any conflict with giving business to another shop if the other shop has what you want and is also a good shop. I don't mean to abandon the shop you've been patronising-- just that you don't need to deal with them exclusively.

  14. #14
    無くなった HereNT's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Blue Order
    How do you know that the Trek dealer wouldn't be just as helpful? It seems that you've given a fair bit of business to one shop, but I don't see any conflict with giving business to another shop if the other shop has what you want and is also a good shop. I don't mean to abandon the shop you've been patronising-- just that you don't need to deal with them exclusively.
    +1 - I have my 'favorite' shop that I go to, but I get stuff from other shops as well. I try to spread it out across them, actually. The favorite shop, I usually get a discount, and they're a block out of my way on the commute. The others, they're smaller shops and probably need my business more, but I don't get the discount...

    I think most shops understand that you're going to buy your stuff in different places and are cool with it. If you really wanted to stick to one shop, though, go to the other, then test ride the Giant. Find the right size, then buy it cheaper online. If anyone gives you grief on the group ride, tell them that's what you did...

  15. #15
    Senior Member DieselDan's Avatar
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    You can't compare the FX to the FCR, as the FX is a hybrid, the FCR is a flat bar road bike. The OP sounds like she wants a flat bar road bike.
    Bikes use brakes to stop.

    If your bike has breaks, don't ride it.

  16. #16
    Prefers Cicero cooker's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by DieselDan
    You can't compare the FX to the FCR, as the FX is a hybrid, the FCR is a flat bar road bike. The OP sounds like she wants a flat bar road bike.
    But she needs lower gears than it has, so she can haul her kids uphill. And she liked the FX she test-rode.

  17. #17
    is slower than you Peek the Geek's Avatar
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    If you rode the Trek and really liked it, get it. Don't let anyone here talk you out of it, and don't worry about the other shop---they'll understand. Go buy the Trek, and return to the shop you like and buy whatever clothing and accessories you need.
    Proud supporter of the Chippewa Off-Road Bike Association (CORBA)
    www.chippewaoffroad.org


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    Unless you really want to spend money on a new bike now, adjust your Sedona to make it better for road riding. You can adjust the bars so they are a bit further forward so your weight is more over the pedals than the seat. A slightly narrower seat may be a bit more comfortable. Smooth road tires 1 1/2" wide will roll a lot easier. Bar ends, set horizontal, will give an alternative hand position and will allow you to get your body lower when you have to fight headwinds. Riding in Lycra cycling shorts and synthetic shirt is a lot more comfortable than jeans and cotton T-shirt - beware that the sizing is based on athletic bodies. For normal clothes I take XL, but my cycling shorts are XXL.

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