Advertise on Bikeforums.net



User Tag List

Results 1 to 9 of 9

Thread: Workmans bike?

  1. #1
    Big Guy
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Posts
    78
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Workmans bike?

    Any clydes here with experience riding a workmans bike?

    - 365pounds, 6'2

    Thanks guys

  2. #2
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2004
    Posts
    5,251
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    I have not ridden one. But, I've seen several articles about them. The most popular model is a one speed that is similar to the Schwinn "Heavi Duti" Cruiser. Reinforced frame. Heavy duty rims, hubs, and components. Probably weighs around fifty pounds.

    The one speed Worksman model was designed for use in and around a factory, on level, smooth surfaces. Pedaling up a steep hill might be a challenge even for Lance Armstrong. I see an older guy in my neighborhood with the Schwinn version, which is almost as heavy. He uses it for one or two mile rides in an area that is very level. Reliable...and a very good workout.

  3. #3
    The Improbable Bulk Little Darwin's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Location
    Wilkes-Barre, PA
    My Bikes
    Many
    Posts
    7,238
    Mentioned
    1 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Hey Dude!

    I don't know anything about this specific bike, but I read in your blog that you are about to get your bike... I assume this is the one you are considering.

    I haven't taken many opportunities to ride outside, today was my second this year (about 14 miles) However, based on your plan to use the exercycle, it motivated me to spend many hours on an exercycle (580 miles so far this year) On my usual exercycle, I actually multiply the mileage reported by 2/3 because this gets me down to my typical road average speed. My goals are 2006 miles on the exercycle, and 2006 miles on the road... I am a little behind on the exercycle, and way behind on the road, but I am picking up my pace on both...

    One warning, don't expect to be effortlessly riding around once you get on the bike. I am finding that hills are a challenge. Take your time, and don't worry about being fast, just worry about keeping at it.

    Good luck on taking the next step in your cycling adventure!
    Slow Ride Cyclists of NEPA

    People do not seem to realize that their opinion of the world is also a confession of character.
    - Ralph Waldo Emerson

  4. #4
    Senior Member john bono's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Posts
    733
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by thorton
    Any clydes here with experience riding a workmans bike?

    - 365pounds, 6'2

    Thanks guys
    I started out riding at about 350 lbs, and I don't think you should get that bike, and UNDER NO CIRCUMSTANCES WHATSOEVER should you get a single-speed. There are two reasons why. 1)When you are on a bicycle, you suddenly discover hills on roads you thought were flat, and you discover giant, steep hills that previously were little dinky hills when riding a car, and 2) at 300+ lbs, every hill looks like Mt. Everest. Frankly, you would be better off with a decent used hybrid(Trek 7000 or something like that) or a hardtail mountain bike with road tires on it. At 365 lbs, there are road bike frames that could handle your weight, but the wheels might need to be trued more often than a hybrid or mountain bike would--so you might be dealing with a maintenance expense long term. As for Walmart bikes, the only word suitable for them is "craptacular".

  5. #5
    jcm
    jcm is offline
    Gemutlichkeit
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Posts
    2,424
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Hi thorton
    I've been looking in on your blog now and again. IMO, you should not get a heavy single-speed. I've ridden the Worksman over many years in the factory. They're tough all right, but they are not for fitness riding unless you can stay on rail-trails or other flat areas. I'm concerned you might injure your knees.

    Find an older mtb and have road type tires put on it. Do not use fat knobbies. They are much harder to roll when you are heavy. Again, it's the knees. I started back in July at 270lbs. I'm down to 225 now.

    You'll have to experiment with a saddle and may wind up with a collection of failures. Here's my suggestion to you:
    http://i3.tinypic.com/wvpusm.jpg
    http://i2.tinypic.com/wvpv0h.jpg

  6. #6
    The Other White Meat BroMax's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Location
    Reno
    My Bikes
    Raleigh Sports 3 speed, Torker T-530
    Posts
    605
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Worksman makes a bike with a 7 speed hub. They are built solid and I considered one for myself. I never got to ride one but after I examined the delivery bikes around Portland, I decided that I prefer something with less rolling resistance for my 300 pound frame. A few extra pounds of bike doesn't matter to me much: if I lost the total weight of the bike, it would come out even. I feel reasonably confident that a good steel frame, such as my old Raleigh 3 speed or Motobecane Gran Touring, won't fail me. I also don't add additional stress by riding over curbs or on steps or very rough surfaces.

  7. #7
    Humvee of bikes =Worksman Nightshade's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2004
    Posts
    5,249
    Mentioned
    1 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    I rode Worksman for 40 yrs on the job both trike and bike. At present
    I own a new Worksman PAV custom trike that I just received.

    How are they to ride? Great as long as you gear them correctly. They
    are heavy but that adds greatly to the ride. (Old heavy Cadillac vs a little
    import ass beater kinda thing). Worksman are also so dependable that so
    little breaks you tend to forget them which is Ok as they are tough.

    If you decide to buy one remember that Worksman is all about getting the
    job done just not in a big hurry. Worksman can be ,if you choose and just
    want to get there everyday,day in day out, the only bike you'll ever need.

    Do I think they are worth the money? Yes, I do. I'm not a bit sorry I
    bought my Worksman PAV 3 speed. You will, however, find many who
    don't "Get" Worksman products. They ARE heavy duty & heavy which
    to the weight weenies here is the death knell. To me, that's their strongest
    point.

  8. #8
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2001
    Location
    England
    Posts
    12,195
    Mentioned
    2 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Worksman tend to be built from lower grade materials and hence need more metal to achieve the required strength.
    A much better Clydesdale bike is the Comotion Mazama
    Kona also do some well regarded Clyde bikes.

  9. #9
    Humvee of bikes =Worksman Nightshade's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2004
    Posts
    5,249
    Mentioned
    1 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by MichaelW
    Worksman tend to be built from lower grade materials and hence need more metal to achieve the required strength.
    A much better Clydesdale bike is the Comotion Mazama
    Kona also do some well regarded Clyde bikes.
    It is this non hi tech steel that holds the price down to workingmans levels. The steel used is also not
    as brittle as hi tech steel is while being way more flexiable than any aluminum bike could ever be.
    Frame & fork durablity on a Worksman is bulletproof when compared to modern metals that are
    reasonably priced.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •