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Old 05-25-06, 08:39 AM   #1
starman7
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best ride quality inder $3000.00?

I am 50 yrs old, ride a 48-49 cm frame for fitness and possibly century. Looking for most comfortable frame for ageing back. What do you guys think? Mondonico steel? Torelli? Titanium?
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Old 05-25-06, 08:40 AM   #2
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i'd check cervelo..that's probably how i'd spend a $3000 store credit!
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Old 05-25-06, 08:45 AM   #3
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Quote:
Originally Posted by starman7
I am 50 yrs old, ride a 48-49 cm frame for fitness and possibly century. Looking for most comfortable frame for ageing back. What do you guys think? Mondonico steel? Torelli? Titanium?
Go with a custom steel peice from the likes of Hairy Gary or Steelman.
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Old 05-25-06, 09:53 AM   #4
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Mmmmm, Vanilla.

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Old 05-25-06, 10:05 AM   #5
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Theoretically Ti or CF should give you the best ride, but mostly it depends on the manufacturer and then on the bike fitting. Ti is very very forgiving. I would forego both Al and steel, they both transmit too much. If CF/Ti doesn't give you relief even after a great fitting. then it's time to look at bents, probably SWB. They now are available with 2 tires of the same size. To maximize fit, you might consider custom. I think guru gives you custom at no charge.

I'd either rent/test ride a potential steed for 30 minutes and then you'd know roughly. A test ride won't be fitted for you so you'll have to adjust for that. The alternative is to have your back checked by a doctor and physical therapist and then listen carefully to their recommendations on cycling, i.e. should you do it and then what positions would be most friendly to your back.
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Old 05-25-06, 11:28 AM   #6
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A race frame is probably not the best style for laid back fitness/century riding.
Light-touring frames (also called Audax, Brevet or Randonee) are specially designed for this style of riding but are such a niche product that you are better served by one of the many US custom builders.
Steel would be the usual material but Ti is also a good choice.
As an example, see some small custom outfits such as Independant fabrications or Waterford. Vanilla is a one man custom shop with a long waiting list.

The features of note are a lightweight, comfortable frame equipped with sufficient tyre clerance for medium tyres plus fenders, an array of threaded eyelets for luggage rack, fenders, waterbottles. Dont confuse this with a loaded touring bike, you want something lightweight and agile. You can strip these bikes down for lightweigth summer riding or kit them up for winter fitness and commuting.
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Old 05-25-06, 12:28 PM   #7
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Softride?
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Old 05-25-06, 03:31 PM   #8
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You can get a great (and comfortable ride) for WELL under $3k. You don't even have to come close to that. Just check out something aluminum or steel in a "comfort road" type of frame...you can do well by yourself for under $1,500, I'd say.

Just make sure the handlebars are about level with the saddle (not lower than), and that it doesn't have an ass hatchet for a saddle.
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Old 05-25-06, 05:03 PM   #9
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I think fit will mean more for your back than material. A Rivendel Atlantis with Schwalbe Big Apple tires 2.35 wide would be a smooth jar free ride with a comfortable riding position. Would work fine for fitness or the chairity run. Smaller tires would be needed for racing.
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Old 05-25-06, 08:23 PM   #10
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Custom-built Marinoni!!

http://www.marinoni.qc.ca
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Old 05-25-06, 09:06 PM   #11
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Mgb :d
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Old 05-26-06, 07:34 AM   #12
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Quote:
Originally Posted by HiYoSilver
Theoretically Ti or CF should give you the best ride, but mostly it depends on the manufacturer and then on the bike fitting. Ti is very very forgiving. I would forego both Al and steel, they both transmit too much.
Ride comfort comes primarily from geometry, then a tie between saddle and tires. I do not consider frame material from a comfort standpoint, because I think the differences are so minute that you must be sensitive indeed to really notice them as a factor.

Use bike geometry to figure comfort. Use materials to figure pricepoint, weight, and longevity.
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Old 05-26-06, 07:38 AM   #13
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We cant tell you,you are the one riding it. Whats good for us could be crap for you but like above said,geometery first. I'm 53 and went with a more relaxed geometery.
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Old 05-26-06, 09:16 AM   #14
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Steel and Ti are very similar in terms of ride. I think steel is probably just slightly better but Ti is a bit lighter. I went through the CF thing myself and gave it up. The CF was "compliant" on the road but not so comfortable - at least for me. Go ride some bikes. Good luck.
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Old 05-26-06, 09:47 AM   #15
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I've ridden 7005 aluminum and 853 steel. Same geometry, same components transfered from one frame to another - the steel is far, far more comfortable.

I also have an aluminum hybrid whose geometry is very similar to the Trek Pilot/Giant OCR/Specialized Sequoia and other assorted fast comfort bikes of the world with lower pressure 700cx28's instead of 700x23's - the steel bike, depite its more aggressive geometry, would still be my first choice in ride quality, overall.

Near as I can tell, none of the major vendors really makes a bike in that style with steel anymore - you might have some luck with boutique brands like Seven Cycles or something like that.
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Old 05-26-06, 01:31 PM   #16
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A Tout Easy or a Rans Stratus should do the trick.
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