Advertise on Bikeforums.net



User Tag List

Results 1 to 13 of 13
  1. #1
    Rides again HiYoSilver's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2004
    Location
    W. Sacramento Region, aka, Nut Tree
    My Bikes
    Giant OCR T, Trek SC
    Posts
    3,259
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    thumbs - what did I do wrong and how to correct?

    Ok, I lowered my seat just a tad. I don't know if there is a cause and effect relationship. I've been noticing more tingling and buzzings in one thumb. I know the question may have been asked many times, but I'll ask.

    If the top of one thumb is bothering you, how do you change your positioning? Lower seat, raise seat, change handlebar height? Or what?

    FYI- changing gloves does not make a difference. 3 different pairs of padded gloves and same effect.
    Hi 'o Silver away

  2. #2
    Senior Member Nermal's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Location
    Farmington, NM
    My Bikes
    Giant Cypress SX
    Posts
    1,867
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    I don't have anything useful for top of the thumb. If you're sure it's related to cycling, check to see that the brake levers and shifters don't neet to be repositioned after the seat adjustment. I'm not expecting much from this idea, but it's cheap and easy, and who knows - it might help.
    Some people are like a Slinky ... not really good for anything, but you still can't help but smile when you shove them down the stairs.

  3. #3
    . bbattle's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2005
    Location
    Huntsville, Alabama
    My Bikes
    2014 Trek Domane 5.2, 1985 Pinarello Trevisio, 1991 Colnago Master, '06 Bianchi San Jose, 1987 Moulton Fuso, '80's Gardin Shred?, '82 John Howard(Dave Tesch)
    Posts
    11,707
    Mentioned
    5 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by HiYoSilver
    Ok, I lowered my seat just a tad. I don't know if there is a cause and effect relationship. I've been noticing more tingling and buzzings in one thumb. I know the question may have been asked many times, but I'll ask.

    If the top of one thumb is bothering you, how do you change your positioning? Lower seat, raise seat, change handlebar height? Or what?

    FYI- changing gloves does not make a difference. 3 different pairs of padded gloves and same effect.

    When you lower the saddle, it moves it forward a bit, too. This will move you forward, putting more weight on the bars. I suggest moving the saddle back, just a tad. Whenever you adjust your fit in one direction, it throws everything else off so make the adjustments small and go back and forth, closing in on the best fit. Raising the bars will reduce the pressure on them as will shortening the stem or raising its angle. A good rule of thumb is that while sitting on the bike and your hands are on the flat part of the bars, you should be able to remove your hands and still hold yourself up.

    Try varying your hand positions on the bars, ride no hands where it's safe to do so. Make sure you aren't holding the bars with a death-grip; I've ridden with closed fists resting on the bars or my forearms on the bars and holding the brake cables.

  4. #4
    your nightmare gal chipcom's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Location
    The Cracker Factory
    Posts
    24,353
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Bbattle called it right...but keep in mind that we're talking mm of adjustment here...a cm at most.

    or...did you happen to remove your thumb from your okole before moving the seat?
    "Let us hope our weapons are never needed --but do not forget what the common people knew when they demanded the Bill of Rights: An armed citizenry is the first defense, the best defense, and the final defense against tyranny. If guns are outlawed, only the government will have guns. Only the police, the secret police, the military, the hired servants of our rulers. Only the government -- and a few outlaws. I intend to be among the outlaws" - Edward Abbey

  5. #5
    Rides again HiYoSilver's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2004
    Location
    W. Sacramento Region, aka, Nut Tree
    My Bikes
    Giant OCR T, Trek SC
    Posts
    3,259
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    thanks, I think the seat is close to back as far as it can, but I'll recheck. I messed up and changed the drop of that thingy holding the handle bars and changed the angle of the bars a tad. I don't know how it will work out, but a 14 miler today was fine.
    Hi 'o Silver away

  6. #6
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Posts
    373
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    The biggest factor is how you position your hands on the bars. Reducing weight on the hands is only reducing the symptoms, lessening the effects of the problem, but doesn't solve the actual problem itself. You're most likely putting weight on nerves of various kinds and may be cutting off circulation as well. The solution is to not put the weight, be it high amounts or low amounts of weight, on those spots.

  7. #7
    Rides again HiYoSilver's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2004
    Location
    W. Sacramento Region, aka, Nut Tree
    My Bikes
    Giant OCR T, Trek SC
    Posts
    3,259
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    I'll bite, where exactly are "those spots"
    Hi 'o Silver away

  8. #8
    Prefers Cicero cooker's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Location
    Toronto
    My Bikes
    1984 Trek 520; 1990s Peugeot (Canadian-made) rigid mountain bike; 2007 Bike Friday NWT; misc others
    Posts
    8,453
    Mentioned
    23 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    When your hands are on the corners or hoods, the bar is placed in the groove in the centre of the heel of the hand where there isn't much natural padding, and where the median nerve comes out of the carpal tunnel in the wrist and splits into separate branches for the thumb and fingers. Maybe your bar is digging into your palm there and pressing on the sensory nerve supply to the thumb.
    Attached Images Attached Images
    Last edited by cooker; 07-07-06 at 10:02 PM.

  9. #9
    Yet another vegan biker
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Location
    Trapped behind the corn curtain
    My Bikes
    Sakae Prism, Vintage Fuji bike(S), too many bikes, one from scratch bike.
    Posts
    965
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    When your hands are on the corners or hoods, the bar is placed in the groove in the centre of the heel of the hand where there isn't much natural padding
    This is exactly why I've been having such good luck with my "reverse" chopped road bars. I find that I ride in the corner with the outside edge of my palm riding on the rearward portion while the padded area of my hand beneath my fingers is resting on the cross portion of the bars. This bar gives me twice the comfort level of any other bar I've used. I've been able to greatly increase my mileage since mounting the bar.

    http://i77.photobucket.com/albums/j7...letourbars.jpg

  10. #10
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Posts
    373
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by HiYoSilver
    I'll bite, where exactly are "those spots"
    Cooker's got it right. The "valley" in the middle of the heel of your palm is the worse spot to place weight. It's easy to do that because the bars and brake hoods naturally "fall" into this valley. I think you want to concentrate the weight to rest on the outside of your palm. Found some pictures in this thread thumb pain and double wraping:






    I had some pain in my hands too, but it was in the soft webbing between the thumb and forefinger. What I was doing was gripping the corners of the bars just above the brake-hoods. I'd have my fingers wrapped around the outside of teh bars and my weight would gradually slide my hands forward until it hit the brake-hoods. But it would continue to slide forward and down until it put a lot of pressure on teh soft flesh between the thumb and forefinger. From Cooker's picture, looks like I may have been pinching a nerve in that area as well. And over time, it would hurt my thumb by bending it back as well... ouch..
    Last edited by Mothra; 07-10-06 at 02:36 PM.

  11. #11
    Rides again HiYoSilver's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2004
    Location
    W. Sacramento Region, aka, Nut Tree
    My Bikes
    Giant OCR T, Trek SC
    Posts
    3,259
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    thanks, I'll give the heel approach a try tomorrow.
    Hi 'o Silver away

  12. #12
    Prefers Cicero cooker's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Location
    Toronto
    My Bikes
    1984 Trek 520; 1990s Peugeot (Canadian-made) rigid mountain bike; 2007 Bike Friday NWT; misc others
    Posts
    8,453
    Mentioned
    23 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by HiYoSilver
    thanks, I'll give the heel approach a try tomorrow.
    And of course vary your hand position from time to time on longer rides.

  13. #13
    Rides again HiYoSilver's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2004
    Location
    W. Sacramento Region, aka, Nut Tree
    My Bikes
    Giant OCR T, Trek SC
    Posts
    3,259
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Yeap, after researching ulnar and carpal nerves, I understand what I was doing wrong. So far feels funny not to put pressure in obvious spots, but my hand likes it more.
    Hi 'o Silver away

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •