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  1. #1
    Youngin biker ckellingc's Avatar
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    stationary bike vs. actual riding

    Well here in the state of misery, or Missouri as some of you spell it, the heat index is 107+. I usually do about 20-30 per day outside but in this heat it's impossible.So recently, I've been doing the stationary bikes at the local YMCA instead of dying outside. I can do about 30-40 miles on the stationary, but I was wondering: what is the work ratio between a stationary and actually riding?

    Thanks.

  2. #2
    Humvee of bikes =Worksman Nightshade's Avatar
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    I can do about 30-40 miles on the stationary, but I was wondering: what is the work ratio between a stationary and actually riding?
    [/QUOTE]

    I'm not sure of the actual numbers of energy expended but I do know that a good ride on a stationary
    will work your heart & cardio system while keeping your muscles tones which is what your want
    anyway........isn't it? Stationary or riding both are very good for you...........

  3. #3
    Videre non videri
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    Quote Originally Posted by ckellingc
    Well here in the state of misery, or Missouri as some of you spell it, the heat index is 107+. I usually do about 20-30 per day outside but in this heat it's impossible.So recently, I've been doing the stationary bikes at the local YMCA instead of dying outside. I can do about 30-40 miles on the stationary, but I was wondering: what is the work ratio between a stationary and actually riding?

    Thanks.
    One major difference is that you don't normally coast when you're on a stationary bike. So for the same amount of time, you probably do more work. Use a heart rate monitor to compare indoor to outdoor exertion levels.

  4. #4
    Youngin biker ckellingc's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by CdCf
    One major difference is that you don't normally coast when you're on a stationary bike. So for the same amount of time, you probably do more work. Use a heart rate monitor to compare indoor to outdoor exertion levels.
    Even when taking hills into account?

  5. #5
    Mad scientist w/a wrench
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    Maybe its because Kentucky's a bit hilly, but I feel like stationaries just don't offer the same resistance, and there's the psychological shift of staring at a wall/mirror/tv versus seeing the world around you move at the speed you're pedaling.

    Personally, I'd just build up heat endurance (maybe 2-5 miles at first) Remember that people on this planet have successfully walked (much slower meaning much less wind-cooling) and lived through some pretty damn extreme temperatures. some cultures endured unbelievable temps because they had a lifetime of getting used to it and a culture that revolved around living in that environment. not to say that not going out for a 30mile ride in 107 heat index makes you a wimp (god knows it would take me a LONG time to get used to that kind of heat) but it IS humanly possible.
    Proudly wearing kit that doesn't match my frame color (or itself) since 2006.

  6. #6
    The Improbable Bulk Little Darwin's Avatar
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    Think about the amount of energy you expend on flat ground.

    Use the same amount of energy on the stationary bike after dialing in a resistance that feels right.

    If the speed reads differently, then you need to adjust by the ratio of speeds between your road speed and the exercycle.

    The ratio and settings differs by exercycle brand, and perhaps by specific exercycle. The one I use most I run at level 3 or 4 and multiply my ending mileage by 2/3 to approximate an equal ride on the road.

    Actually the way I did it also works... ride for one hour on each with the same level of effort and see how the resulting distance varies...
    Slow Ride Cyclists of NEPA

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  7. #7
    Senior Member wahoonc's Avatar
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    Get a set of rollers and work on your technique in air conditoned comfort. For years I didn't have a house with A/C so the heat didn't really bother me, just slowed me down a bit. 107 is doable. FWIW we measured the Heat Index on my jobsite the other day at 135 degrees needless to say, not much work was going on. Looks like time to move to night shift for a while.

    Aaron

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    Senior Member geebee's Avatar
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    If I'm on my indoor bike I spend a fair bit of time winding the pressure up and down to simulate road riding and keep it more interesting, I often back off to almost coasting levels after a hard "climb" again it is much more like real world. I have a spin bike (freewheel)with a massive flywheel as it is smoother like a real bike and winds up and down nicely, it is magneticly braked but after I adjusted the magnets to allow a really minimal clearance on max pressure I can stand and stomp just like on road.
    I'm indoor at the moment due to cold and rain (Other side of the globe), I still ride outdoor at every chance.
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  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by ckellingc
    Well here in the state of misery, or Missouri as some of you spell it, the heat index is 107+. I usually do about 20-30 per day outside but in this heat it's impossible.So recently, I've been doing the stationary bikes at the local YMCA instead of dying outside. I can do about 30-40 miles on the stationary, but I was wondering: what is the work ratio between a stationary and actually riding?

    Thanks.
    There isn't one for the kind of bike you are riding. In other words, the "miles" that the machines display are for amusement purposes only and aren't really related to how far you would have ridden on the road.

    Trainers with progressive resistance are closer to road bikes, but their resistance is based on a specific speed/drag curve, which may not be the same as your bike.

    It is true that since you don't coast or stop on a trainer/stationary bike, 45 minutes on the trainers is roughtly equal to an hour on the road.
    Eric

    2005 Trek 5.2 Madone, Red with Yellow Flames (Beauty)
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    Read my cycling blog at http://riderx.info/blogs/riderx
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  10. #10
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    I just got a stationary cycle this weekend.I use it for time rather than miles.I know that it is not the same as a regular bike.I would love a set of rollers but I just cannot afford them.I gave $8.50 for it.I have spent about 30 minutes on it.It is old and noisy but it works.I will probly ride it tonight cause the wind is blowing here.
    Just put in a movie and ride the movie.If it is peddaling to easy just up the resistance.You will get a great work out.
    Rick G
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  11. #11
    Been Around Awhile I-Like-To-Bike's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by krazygluon
    but it IS humanly possible.
    I hope so. It was 80 this morning at 5am. I'm riding home from work (12 miles) when the predicted air temp is 97 and the heat value will be 106.

  12. #12
    Elitist Troglodyte DMF's Avatar
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    Actually, riding in the heat isn't that bad. The wind evaporates your sweat a lot quicker than at walking speed, cooling you off much quicker. (In dry heat this technique is so efficient that it is used to air condition houses.) You just have to drink a LOT of water and beware of the signs of heat exhaustion.

    I've spent a lot of time this year riding stationary bikes at the local Crunch (now a Bally's) gym to get back in shape for real riding, and real riding over the last month or so. Here's my take:

    • The stationary bike is much better for low levels of work. In the world the size of the hill and the size of your ass are non-negotiable. (Speed is negotiable, but there is a minimum.)
    • A real ride is much better for maximal efforts, assuming you have hills nearby. And it's less subject to wimping out. Once you're out there you have to get over the next hill; on a machine you can talk yourself out of it.
    • A real bike uses more muscles much like free weights use more muscles than machines.
    • It's easier to meet chicks at the gym.

  13. #13
    Used Stationary Bikes
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    let me share to you some cons for both stationary bikes and actual riding

    actual riding:
    - you NEED to wear a helmet.
    - greater possibility of accidents
    - traffic rules
    - etc.

    stationary bike:
    - no real scenery (you can substitute tv for this )
    - no fresh air (depends on where you live)

    Lately I saw this bicycle and was shocked with the price! you can actually buy a used car with the amount! while on the other hand when buying used stationary bikes it is a lot cheaper. cost wise i'll stick with stationary bikes. and besides, like you said you get more miles using your stationary bike.
    Last edited by shockware; 08-18-10 at 11:21 PM.
    tips and guides about used stationary bikes http://www.dogengine.com/us/used-stationary-bikes.php

  14. #14
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    gaming exercse bike

    There is nothing like riding outside. I hate stationary bikes, they are just too boring.

    I want to connect a PC to my stationary bike to make it more interesting (play a racing game on a big screen TV). I have seen couple of options for biking game controllers; http://www.cyberbiking.com has a controller; however it is not yet available. www.pcgamerbike.com is an older product and I do not know how good it is (looks cheap).

    If there are other options, I would be glad to see them.

    AB

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