Cycling and bicycle discussion forums. 
   Click here to join our community Log in to access your Control Panel  


Go Back   > >

General Cycling Discussion Have a cycling related question or comment that doesn't fit in one of the other specialty forums? Drop on in and post in here! When possible, please select the forum above that most fits your post!

User Tag List

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Old 09-27-06, 05:15 PM   #1
mistercoffee
poo go
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Sep 2006
Bikes:
Posts: 11
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
how do you lock your bike?

your technique for the most secure fit. where do you loop? through the rear stays and wheel? around the front wheel and inner triangle? kryptonite?
mistercoffee is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-27-06, 05:44 PM   #2
roughrider504
Senior Member
 
roughrider504's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2005
Location: New Orleans
Bikes:
Posts: 1,214
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
U lock around rear wheel.
roughrider504 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-27-06, 06:16 PM   #3
Lurker1999
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2006
Location: Boston
Bikes: Jamis Coda Sport '06
Posts: 548
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Sheldon Brown lock strategy

mechBgon lock strategy

Pitlock skewers

Get a Kryptonite New York STD lock. It'll allow enough room in the shackle to lock both your frame and rear wheel.
Lurker1999 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-27-06, 07:13 PM   #4
geo8rge
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2006
Bikes:
Posts: 2,012
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
My data mostly comes from craigslist New York and bicyclist forums. The bike theft situation in NYC is probably worse than other places because:
1) Many more people pass your chained bike. In some places you could actually have a million people pass it in a 24 hr period.
2) The construction and auto repair industries guarantee that many of the people passing your bike have tools that can be used in bicycle theft.
3) The bicycle messenger and delivery industry guarantees people who know bikes, and need bikes are around your bikes.

Each entry is at least one theft.
x3 = times 3, 3 thefts of this type.
* = my own personal theft.

Locked Bicycles (main lock failed):
- One wheel securely locked to pole. Bicycle frame (and other wheel) stolen (not locking frame was usually unintentional) * x2
- Bicycle Cable Lock cut with bolt/cable cutter. * x4
- Lock/locking mechanism Cut (chain or cable)
- Cheaper U lock forced open. *
- Hack saw with titanium blade goes through Kryptonite chain's lock in about 20 min. *
- Bike locked with Master Lock Street Cuffs for motorcycles stolen.

Locked Bicycles (main lock did not fail):
- Locked bike lifted over pole and stolen.
- Bike, with wheel immobilized by lock, stored in communal hallway of apartment stolen.
- "Ring Posts" use to lock bikes to in Toronto broken with 2x4s.
- Bike locked to construction scaffolding stolen when scaffolding was dismantled by thief. x2
- Bike chained to parking meter. Bicyclist thought the chain was tight enough but a thief was able to loosen it, lift the bike over the meter, and walk away with the bike.
- Front wheel (with unique key locking skewers) locked to pole. Locking skewers defeated, bike stolen with front wheel left locked to pole.

Locked Bicycles (Performance of lock unkown):
- Mysterious disappearance of bike and kryptonite lock. (no parts of lock or chain found) x4

Unlocked Bicycles:
- Unlocked bicycle stolen from apartment with unlocked front door.
- Bicycle left unlocked near cashier of grocery store stolen while owner shopped.
- Bicycle left unlocked in front of restaurant while patron made "quick" (30 second) purchase.
- Bicycle stolen from open unlocked garage.
- Bicycle left outside unlocked
- Bicycle stolen off the racks at a local bicycle store (shoplifting).

Bike locks damaged:
- Kryptonite Combination U lock jammed shut by hammer attack. Bike not stolen. x2 *

Vandalism/Stolen parts:
- Keys left in bike lock, only lock and chain stolen.
- Locking mechanism for folding frame stolen * x2
- Bicycle frame pump forgotten on bike stolen *
- Bungee cord left on bike (who would steel that) was stolen *
- inexpensive seatpost/saddle stolen
- Bike stripped of parts (gears and handle bars included), U locked frame left in place.

As seen on TV show about bicycle thefts:
- Cable cut by NYC bike messenger using cable cutter.
- In Chicago: Pole fastened to base by bolt. Bolt removed so the pole, not the bike, can be lifted and the bike stolen.

Lessons:

Always lock your bike, even if you think you will be quick.

Anticipate a thief lifting a locked bike over the pole the bike is chained to.

Cable locks, even thick heavy steel ones, are easily defeated (even by hand tools).

A smaller sledge hammer is a common tool, if your bike just has a U lock there are dudes that will take a shot at it, possibly jamming the lock.

It is possible to pry open the cheaper U locks.

A U+Cable lock requires thief to have 2 attacks to be successful.

With 2 locking methods it is unlikely you will fail to properly deploy both leaving your bike unlocked.

Kryptonite chains are a thing of value, and are a target; Perhaps even more valuable than the bike. Theives may be taking both the lock and chain as they are required to make a claim to Kryptonite. By taking the chain and lock, even if damaged, they reduce the chance of you filing a police report; Which you would have to do to claim the insurance payment from Kryptonite.

I have read about cases where reporting a stolen bike to police and posting on craigslist actually resulted in a recovered bike.

Identifying a stolen bike and confirming your ownership to police can be difficult. You should definitely place a sticker or note (preferably water proof) with your name on it on the seat post or other place. Registering with police is also a good idea. Etching your name and tel# on parts is more permanent, and will make selling it as a used bike harder both for a thief and you. Record and email yourself with all serial numbers, and a picture of the bike.

Other ideas:

- Remove parts from the bike. Skewers, seat posts, QR pedals (MKS brand for example) are all easy to remove from the bike and make the bike difficult to ride and sell, and less valuable. Extremists could even remove the chain if it had a QR link installed.

- Allen or locking skewers (pitlock, On Guard) may help. Or may not I have seen no evidence either way. I feel enough hits with a sledge hammer, or just pulling on the frame, will dislodge the skewer from the dropouts. Expensive locking skewers might be a tip off to thieves that your bike has expensive parts. Allen skewers are inexpensive and weigh less but will cause you grief if you have to fix a flat and do not have an allen key.

- Lubricate the lock. Oil into shackle and key hole.

As usual see SheldonBrown.com for ideas.

QR = quick release
__________________
2000 Montague CX, I do not recommend it, but still ride it.
Strida 3, I recommend it for rides < 10mi wo steep hills.
2006 Rowbike 720 Sport, I recommend it as an exercise bike.
1996 Birdy, Recommend.
Wieleder CARiBIKE (folding), decent frame.

Last edited by geo8rge; 06-23-08 at 10:13 AM.
geo8rge is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-27-06, 10:35 PM   #5
operator
cab horn
 
Join Date: Jun 2004
Location: Toronto
Bikes: 1987 Bianchi Campione
Posts: 28,306
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Quote:
4) The large number of poorly paid immigrant and other laborers who need but cannot afford bikes guarantees a market for stolen bikes.
This crap again? Sigh.
operator is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-27-06, 10:52 PM   #6
Maelstrom 
Wood Licker
 
Maelstrom's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2002
Location: Whistler,BC
Bikes: Transition Dirtbag, Kona Roast 2002 and specialized BMX
Posts: 16,885
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
I take it inside.

Quote:
4) The large number of poorly paid immigrant and other laborers who need but cannot afford bikes guarantees a market for stolen bikes.
I live in a fairly rich world and it isn't the poor taking, its the greedy, the ones who want without the ability to work. That crap doesn't apply everywhere. Lazy...yes, thats a thief and universal.
Maelstrom is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-28-06, 05:13 AM   #7
Mairead
Newbie
 
Join Date: Sep 2006
Bikes:
Posts: 2
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
For routine use (e.g. grocery shopping) I use a half-inch (or maybe it's three eighths ...I have a cat on my lap right now and can't go look (edit: 5/16)) wire cable and the u-lock from my NY Chain. I loop it around both frame and rear wheel. I also have a thin cable that secures the seat, rear rack, and rear rack basket. That cable wouldn't stop anyone with a cutter, but at least someone can't walk up with a hex wrench and walk away with those parts.

For non-routine use, I carry and use the chain, too. But it weighs about 3KG so I prefer not to lug it around routinely.


As a side note: I, too, dispute the idea that it's the poor who steal. In my experience, people are very often poor precisely because they're honest and non-exploitative. It's the well-off, with their overweening sense of entitlement, who do the most thieving--generally under color of law.
Mairead is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-28-06, 06:34 AM   #8
EventServices
Announcer
 
EventServices's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2005
Location: Detroit's North Side.
Bikes: Many
Posts: 5,075
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1 Post(s)
I feel very fortunate to have never owned a bike lock.

But I notice some people locking their bikes in a way that a mean-spirited third grader could lift it in seconds.

Note: If you're offended by my use of "third grader", please insert "poor immigrant" in front of it, and then the original doesn't sound as bad.
EventServices is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-28-06, 07:34 AM   #9
geo8rge
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2006
Bikes:
Posts: 2,012
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
As to immigrants I did not say they were stealing them. The fact is in NYC there is an 'alternative' market for everything: labor, bicycles, cell phones, apartments, cars much of which would be illegal if sold or rented to US citizens.

They travel to the US illegally.

Illegal immirgants live in households that would be considered illegal due to building and other code/common sense issues.

They often buy cars that would be considered totalled and unusable.

The use pay as you go cell phone contracts that US citizens would avoid.

They work without Workers comp insurance and for less than the min wage.

They incure exhorbitant fees whenever they use banking services.

Why do you suppose any of the other goods and services they purchase are through normal channels?
__________________
2000 Montague CX, I do not recommend it, but still ride it.
Strida 3, I recommend it for rides < 10mi wo steep hills.
2006 Rowbike 720 Sport, I recommend it as an exercise bike.
1996 Birdy, Recommend.
Wieleder CARiBIKE (folding), decent frame.
geo8rge is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-28-06, 07:40 AM   #10
miked528
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2006
Location: Union County N.J.
Bikes: 07 Fuji Roubaix Pro, 02 Fuji Sunfire MTB
Posts: 106
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Good old fashion thick cable and padlock is the best, IMO.
miked528 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-28-06, 07:47 AM   #11
celephaiz
I sing the body electric
 
Join Date: Apr 2005
Location: PHL
Bikes: 2006 CrossCheck, Fuji Track 2004
Posts: 694
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by Maelstrom
I live in a fairly rich world and it isn't the poor taking, its the greedy, the ones who want without the ability to work. That crap doesn't apply everywhere. Lazy...yes, thats a thief and universal.
Not sure, but i took the poster to mean that there is an "assured market" for stolen bikes and not necessarily that the poor steal the bikes, just that they buy them. Not saying i agree, but i find what i read to be far less objectionable than what people are taking it to mean.
celephaiz is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-28-06, 07:50 AM   #12
DieselDan
Senior Member
 
DieselDan's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2003
Location: Beaufort, South Carolina, USA and surrounding islands.
Bikes: Cannondale R500, Motobecane Messenger
Posts: 8,521
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
I ride a road bike. Nobody steals those around here.
DieselDan is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-28-06, 07:55 AM   #13
cooker
Prefers Cicero
 
cooker's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2005
Location: Toronto
Bikes: 1984 Trek 520; 1990s Peugeot (Canadian-made) rigid mountain bike; 2007 Bike Friday NWT; misc others
Posts: 10,675
Mentioned: 5 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 505 Post(s)
I ride an old road bike. U-lock through the rear wheel (Sheldon Brown), fat cable through frame and front wheel, thin cable through seat rails.
cooker is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-28-06, 08:15 AM   #14
slowandsteady
Faster but still slow
 
slowandsteady's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2006
Location: Jersey
Bikes: Trek 830 circa 1993 and a Fuji WSD Finest 1.0 2006
Posts: 5,979
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Dead bolted solid wood door, locked screen door, and a very angry terrier. I never leave my bike outside.
slowandsteady is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-28-06, 08:25 AM   #15
mechBgon
Senior Member
 
mechBgon's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2002
Bikes:
Posts: 6,957
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
I try to use my two-locks-to-two-separate-objects approach when possible, and get the frame and both wheels locked, plus a thin cable to prevent casual theft of the seat and seatpost. Sturdy pipe railings are good for this approach.

mechBgon is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-28-06, 08:47 AM   #16
froze
Banned.
 
Join Date: Feb 2003
Location: Fort Wayne, Indiana
Bikes: 84 Trek 660 Suntour Superbe; 87 Giant Rincon Shimano XT; 07 Mercian Vincitore Campy Veloce
Posts: 4,762
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Proper U-Bolt installation is first using a full size one not a mini because you need to remove the front wheel place it along side the rear and lock both wheels and the seat tube to a secure object (you may want to buy some fork dropout protectors that slip over the dropout to protect from marring). Get a good U-Bolt like the Krypto Forgettaboutit(sp?).

Then use a second lock such as the Krypto Chain if security and/or the bike is expensive is an issue, but that thing is heavy so depending on your security issues in the area you could use a very thick cable with a high quality lock like the Abus Disc if security problems are low. You could, if you get permission, leave the chain lock where you park the bike if you can secure it so it doesn't get stolen for fun.

I was only protecting my bike at home with my German Shepherd, but now that she's 16 years old (112 in dog years) she may be dying or we may have to put her down we're waiting to see if she recovers without undue suffering, though not likely considering her age; so I may have to get a new guard dog here soon. At work it's in the office so everyone there guards it...not that anyone would enter an office to steal a bike!
froze is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-28-06, 09:07 AM   #17
alanbikehouston
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2004
Bikes:
Posts: 5,250
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
If you live in "Friendly Village", you can get by with a $30 OnGuard Pitbull around the rear wheel, and a locking bolt on the front wheel, or a cheap cable around the front wheel.

But, if you park on a college campus, or in a large American city, you need a "gold" rated u-lock, such as the Kryptonite Fahgettaboudit u-lock, or the OnGuard Brute around the rear wheel and a light u-lock, such as the OnGuard Pitbull around the front wheel.

But, if you are like 90% of the cyclists in my neighborhood, you will use a $20 cable lock, attached only to the frame, or only to the front wheel. I love parking between two bikes locked only with a cable lock. They are an absolute guarantee that no crook will even look at my bike.

www.soldsecure.com/Leisure.htm
alanbikehouston is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-29-06, 06:32 AM   #18
mistercoffee
poo go
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Sep 2006
Bikes:
Posts: 11
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
thanks for all the information. we have a big problem with bike theft on our campus (at LaGrange College). I have also been a victim (1989 Peugeot stolen for drunken joy ride, dude hit a wall or car gate and bent the frame but it was probably worse for him). This is a campus of 1200 people in a small town but there have been sightings of people walking around with bolt cutters!! I just purchsed the lock in the last photo around the front wheel but the guy in the bike shop said anyone with a drill could take it off easily. For now I only lock my bike when I ride somewhere, all other times it sits in the living room of my apartment.
mistercoffee is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-29-06, 08:07 AM   #19
Michigander
Senior Member
 
Michigander's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2005
Bikes: Giant ATX 1200, Schwinn Peleton
Posts: 1,724
Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 80 Post(s)
I lock my bikes to the carrying handle on my Greenlee Box. I don't have to worry about locking them up while out, because I never bike commute.
__________________
Bring back the Sig Test!


(\__/)
(='.'=)
(")_(")
Michigander is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 09-29-06, 11:31 AM   #20
mlts22 
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2006
Bikes:
Posts: 998
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
1: Your real good bike, you should bring inside your place of residence [1]. Inside, as in the residence, not in a courtyard, balcony, or garage. This covers two things. If someone breaks into your home, homeowner's or tenant's insurance would likely cover the theft, which may be otherwise not claimable. Second, a thief entering a home is facing a lot more criminal charges than just stealing a bike.

2: Have a commute bike, something that you won't be totally financially ruined if it gets stolen. Buy Pitlocks from the site listed by Lurker1999. Install them. Find a locking style (Sheldon Brown style, mechBgon style, whatever style balances your piece of mind versus time locking/unlocking and time lugging locks.)

3: Make sure the object you are locking your bike to isn't something easily cut, or your bike able to be lifted off. Parking meters are a good example of what to avoid locking your bike. So are signs where the sign can be easily removed. So are the circles welded to posts which people wrench off with a 2x4 or other lever.

4: Worrying about bike theft is important, but don't let it consume you.

[1]: A neighbor had two bicycles which were in his locked courtyard stolen recently. Courtyards or porches help, but at the minimum, slap some type of lock onto your bike so its not an easy smash and grab.
mlts22 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-29-06, 11:37 AM   #21
chephy
Two H's!!! TWO!!!!!
 
chephy's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2005
Location: Toronto, ON
Bikes:
Posts: 4,226
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Place to lock: a beefy bike rack or post (although a problem's been uncovered with Toronto's post-and-ring design), preferably where I can see it from the store/restaurant etc. I'm going to.

NY Kryptonite U-lock around rear wheel and rear triangle.

Cable around frame and front wheel. Not that great, but I can tolerate losing a front wheel... Sometimes in especially bad areas I'll remove the front wheel and actually take it with me whereever I'm going.

Quick-release seatpost with my favourite Body Geometry seat goes with me (there is tape on seatpost for quick insertion without continuous readjustment ). Same for front light and cyclocomputer.

A lot of places will also just let you roll your bike right in.
chephy is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-22-08, 02:45 PM   #22
DTownDave22
Senior Member
 
DTownDave22's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2007
Location: Riverview, MI
Bikes: flat bar road bike
Posts: 191
Mentioned: 2 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1 Post(s)
I've done some searching around on here to find out where people put their bike locks, chain, whatever bike security items they use, on the bike when the lock is not in use when riding the bike. I have not been able to find anything. Perhaps someone will see this question and give me some advice, so I don't have to make another thread but perhaps you all like excessive amounts of threads on here.

I was thinking either a rack on the back of the bike, a bag on the front middle handle bars (I think this is what it's called), though this seems a bit too small, or I could just wear a backpack and put it in there which doesn't seem like a bad idea.

Last edited by DTownDave22; 06-23-08 at 04:32 PM.
DTownDave22 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-22-08, 09:28 PM   #23
TalkingHead
Commie
 
Join Date: Jun 2008
Location: Las Vegas
Bikes: Trek 7.3 FX, old Haro(92)
Posts: 278
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
well seems most places around here dont have any way to lock the bike up near the store! unless you feel like locking it up at distance. When i do however, i use pit bull u lock and the wheel loop with it..from the back of frame through rear wheel around whatever pole or rack is available which isnt often. Lucky most places will let you walk the bike inside and keep an eye on it, like gas station etc
TalkingHead is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-22-08, 10:53 PM   #24
maddyfish
Senior Member
 
maddyfish's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2006
Location: Ky. and FL.
Bikes: KHS steel SS
Posts: 3,944
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Please don't just lock your rear wheel. There is no good reason not to lock the rear wheel and the frame.

Me I use and Onguard pitbull on the frame and rear wheel, plus a heavy cable through the frame and front wheel.

Make sure what you are locking to is very secure and your bike can not be lifted over top of it.
maddyfish is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-23-08, 01:19 PM   #25
Bookman
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2008
Location: Sacramento
Bikes: Trek 7100
Posts: 122
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
1. Take your bike inside, whether you're at home, visiting a friend, commuting to work, or anywhere else, if you think you can get away with it. I haven't tried it yet, but I plan to take mine into the grocery store the next time I'm there. Wheels are wheels. Shopping-cart wheels go outdoors too, and nobody thinks about what they might bring into the store. Don't be afraid to push boundaries here. This is the most you can do to prevent your bike getting stolen. The thief is going to steal a bike. You want it to be somebody else's.

2. When I lock I use a Kryptonite U-lock and a 5/8-inch cable combination-lock. I lock the frame and rear wheel to a fixed object, making sure that it truly is fixed. I make the Kryptonite U-lock connection as tight as possible, hooking the pedal/crank in there if I can, which makes it harder for a hacksaw blade to do its job. Then I route the cable through both wheels and through/around the fixed object as well. And then I pray the bike is still there when I get back.
Bookman is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off



All times are GMT -6. The time now is 09:28 PM.