Advertise on Bikeforums.net



User Tag List

Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 25 of 35
  1. #1
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2003
    Location
    Netherlands
    Posts
    102
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Does anyone use a GPS map gadget on their bike?

    I've dreamed about this many years ago and now the prices are in the doable range. For roughly $200 (give or take) anyone can buy a hand held GPS gadget which is roughly the size of a mobile phone. You can easily pin point your location and find your way to the nearest watering hole.

    They have mounting brackets that can be used on bikes ... has anyone actually bought this technology for their bike? I don't subscribe to any biking magazines, are there advertisements for this technology to be used on bikes.

    Do I have too much free time on my hands?

  2. #2
    Banned.
    Join Date
    Feb 2003
    Location
    Fort Wayne, Indiana
    My Bikes
    84 Trek 660 Suntour Superbe; 87 Giant Rincon Shimano XT; 07 Mercian Vincitore Campy Veloce
    Posts
    4,766
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    YOU GOTTA TO BE KIDDING RIGHT? $200 for a electronic map? Can't you just go get a map for $2 and use it? Heck if your touring you can get maps from Adventure Cycling and pick and chose which area you will be riding in for about $11 each and give you more info than the GPS ever will! I drove across America and drove to Texas on some off beat roads, I have rode my bike into mountains and places I have never been for the last 30+ years and never had a GPS, and most of the time never used a map, but a map is nice, but a GPS is for rich folk that can't read maps.

  3. #3
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2003
    Location
    Netherlands
    Posts
    102
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    I've toyed with the idea of buying one for my car, but the costs were simply too much. My brother-in-law has one in his car and it is really neat. Streets in cities in Europe don't always travel in a straight line and you can easily lose your sense of direction. I grew up in Philadelphia and it was easy to find your way in center city, it was a grid.

    When the prices drop to a reasonable level, I will buy one at least for my car. When I get my tax return next year I might even buy one for the bike.

  4. #4
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2001
    Location
    England
    Posts
    12,399
    Mentioned
    3 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    GPS does have its uses. My brother uses one to locate individual plants in the desert, so he can return the next year to check on them.

    You have to be careful using them for detailed navigation. In well mapped areas, they are not usually neccessary. In badly mapped area, ground feature may be wrongly positioned on the map. You have to use some intelligence to make sense of a bad map even if you know exactly where you are.

    For city navigation a compass is quite useful, since you can locate yourself using street signs, but they dont indicate your orientation. In some parts of the world where street names are in non-roman script (Japan/China etc), I guess GPS could be handy.

  5. #5
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2002
    Location
    mass
    Posts
    942
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    I carry a garmin E-map when I mountain bike in new england, I carry it in my hydra-pack on my back. I have been lost for over 8 hours before in upstate maine. Whenever I tread into an unfamilliar area I carry it, if nothing else, it get me back to the truck when I want. I don't often use the map portion, I just use it to give me a bread crumb trail to follow back to the car if I loose my bearing. I feel it has paid for itself many, many times.
    Achieve your goals: Attitude is everything:

  6. #6
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2003
    Location
    Netherlands
    Posts
    102
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Originally posted by mrfix
    I carry a garmin E-map when I mountain bike in new england, I carry it in my hydra-pack on my back. I have been lost for over 8 hours before in upstate maine. Whenever I tread into an unfamilliar area I carry it, if nothing else, it get me back to the truck when I want. I don't often use the map portion, I just use it to give me a bread crumb trail to follow back to the car if I loose my bearing. I feel it has paid for itself many, many times.
    mrfix, can you give us an approximate price and size for your Garmin E-map? Thanks, Dave

  7. #7
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2003
    Posts
    895
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    As a Cadillac driver, GM gave me a hand-held unit a couple of years ago. It wasn't worth the effort and I sold it last year after not using at all. If I can see the sun I can usually find my way about. When I have the funds for a newer/better model GPS I use them for a new set of Neutron wheels. That will help my climbing while a GPS would just add some weight.

  8. #8
    Senior Member Bobatin's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2002
    Location
    Newnan, GA
    Posts
    402
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    I am interested in getting a GPS to map mountain bike trails and give me climb profiles for road rides. Is there a good system for this, using survey maps?
    So, if you're in the car, waiting impatiently. . . get over it - you're not that special.
    "Its not what you take when you leave, Its what you leave when you go."
    Some country and western song

  9. #9
    Got Jesus? bikeCOLORADO's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2003
    Location
    Colorado Springs, USA!
    Posts
    465
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    I have and use a Garmin ETrex Vista...it's one of the coolest gadgets I own.

    Here's an idea of the plots you can do with some Topo software:





    I don't use it so much to keep me on track, but to keep track of all the details of where I've ridden. Of course, if you were to get lost out in the boonies - it sure would help you find your way out too.

  10. #10
    www.activebody.org
    Join Date
    Apr 2002
    Location
    Madison, WI
    My Bikes
    Airborne Zepp 2003, Co-Motion Tandem, Trek 8000 mtn bike (commuter), Klein Attitude Comp
    Posts
    221
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    I use the etrex venture and love it. Right now it sits on the stoker handlebar of our tandem. Great way to give speed, distance and other info to my wife without running wires to the back wheel.

    And since these things are ment to be in boats they are pretty tough and water tight.

    I also use topo software to map out "stuff".

    What topo software do you use bike COLORADO?

    -clint
    www.activebody.org

  11. #11
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2003
    Posts
    1,180
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    I can barely figure out my left my right

  12. #12
    Career Cyclist threadend's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2002
    Location
    Michigan, USA
    Posts
    551
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Yes, road and MTB, and hiking, jogging and yakking. I often get off the beaten path and don't care to be restricted by the boundries of familiarity so it is invaluable to me.

    Using the Garmin Rhino 120, which includes a 2-way radio with 5 mile range and 8 mb of downloadable memory, creates some interesting alternatives to just going out for some fresh air exercise. I like gadgets, a GPS is one of the most versatile gadgets for my lifestyle.

    Maps and compasses have some advantages, the map can be used as a survival blanket and a high quality compass will relect sunlight off it's face to catch the attention of the search crew in the resue plane
    2003 Iceman Challenge - 2:34:55 - 897 / 2,000*
    2002 Iceman Challenge - 2:39:23 - 1093 / 2,186
    2000 Iceman Challenge - 2:49:18 - 1516 / 2,153
    *estimated

  13. #13
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2002
    Location
    Laguna Hills, OC, California
    Posts
    265
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Like bikeCOLORADO I too have a a Garmin ETrex Vista. It is great to let you know where you are, elevation and keeps the history of the trip. I have it mounted with a motocycle mount which used couple of ball joints and U-bracket to attach to the handlebar. It is an fun toy, but the display doesn't replace a good map. BTW - I am not rich and I can reed maps. Thanks for placing me into those ranks though!

  14. #14
    Got Jesus? bikeCOLORADO's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2003
    Location
    Colorado Springs, USA!
    Posts
    465
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    I use Maptech Terrain Navigator is the software I use with the E-Trex Vista.

  15. #15
    Senior Member danr's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2002
    Location
    Midwest USA
    My Bikes
    Trek 8000 (I'm testing a prototype).
    Posts
    590
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    bikeCOLORADO, that looks like a really cool toy. Makes me wish I was back out west.
    Does the perfect bike really exist?

  16. #16
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Dec 2001
    Location
    New Jersey
    Posts
    6,263
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    I'm going to get one this summer. I like the fact you can find coordinates on Mapqust and set them into the Vista before you ride. That way you can get to a location fairly easily without ever having been there before! They also have a map software where you can find coordinates of street locations. Real cool.

  17. #17
    DEADBEEF khuon's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Catching his breath alongside a road near Seattle, WA USA
    My Bikes
    1999 K2 OzM, 2001 Aegis Aro Svelte
    Posts
    12,155
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    I've been a long time user of GPS ever since I started using them for flying. I currently have a Garmin Streetpilot in my Jeep which is nice in that you can download topo maps for offroading... something not many other vehicle GPS navigation systems have. That and it's also a self-contained unit (unlike a lot of vehicle nav systems) so I can move it from vehicle to vehicle. However, it's still too large a unit for mounting on a bicycle or carrying in a pack. It also has a limited battery runtime despite using 6xAA batteries. I have been contemplating a handheld unit and have been looking at the Garmin Rino 120 which threadend mentioned above. My riding partners and I already carry FRS radios to contact each other on the longer rides and tours so combining the two functions would be perfect. I was thinking that with the Rino, I could also download maps the ride's route maps to the GPS. One other thing that wasn't mentioned about the Rino is that if the other party also has one, you can beam your locations to each other and they will automatically be plotted onto the map... very handy for long-distance group charity rides. Another thing that I've been participating in is Geocaching (think GPS-based easter egg or scavanger hunting). I think I would like to combine Geocaching with cycling. There's one person in my area who is both a Geocacher and mountainbiker. I think he might have planted some caches near trails. At anyrate, a lot of caches reside in the woods or in parks... perfect for road or mountain biking excursions.
    1999 K2 OzM 2001 Aegis Aro Svelte OCP Club Member
    "Be liberal in what you accept, and conservative in what you send." -- Jon Postel, RFC1122

  18. #18
    On Your Right ZackJones's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2003
    Location
    Warner Robins, GA
    Posts
    1,422
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    I have the Garmin Emap. Here's one for sale on Ebay if you want to see the size of it (http://cgi.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dll...category=34289)

    I used it yesterday on the bike. When my wife and I ride I've found our distances are often different when we finish so I took the GPS with me while we rode and compared our computer distance to the GPS distance. Turns out her's is a bit more dialed in than mine.

    I have used my GPS for all sorts of stuff. I have mapping software running on my laptop and have used it to plot my trips - this is really handy to have if the Interstate is blocked due to an accident. I can easily find an alternate route.

    About the only drawback of the eMap is that the map included with the device can not be updated. You can store additioinal map details on a separate memory card but the base map can't be updated

    Zack
    "You never fail, you simply produce results. Learn from these" - Anonymous

  19. #19
    Member
    Join Date
    Dec 2002
    Location
    Frankfort KY
    Posts
    51
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Originally posted by davehorne
    mrfix, can you give us an approximate price and size for your Garmin E-map? Thanks, Dave
    I use a Garmin Etrex Legend. Should be less than $250. Does everything a cycle computer does except cadence. One of the features is that it will record a trail of where you have been. You can use this to retrace this later or to upload to your pc and plot on a hard copy map.

    You can (on the pc) plot your route and download to the etrex.

    I have enjoyed this for almost two years with no regrets!
    Robert Tankersley

  20. #20
    cycle-powered nathank's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2002
    Location
    Munich Germany (formerly Portland OR, Texas)
    My Bikes
    '02 Specialized FSR, '03 RM Slayer, '99 Raleigh R700, '97 Norco hartail, '89 Stumpjumper
    Posts
    1,848
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    GPS can be great for cycling! our MTB club/guide company had a seminar/presentation about GPS and mountain biking about a month ago and i saw some cool stuff.

    i have a Garmine eTrex Summit that i bought mainly for mountaineering. some time this year i will buy the computer cable and start planning routes on the computer as well as downloading ride info for stats.

    basically, you can use it for the following:
    1) with electronic maps you can plan trips on the computer, then download the route to the unit for in-route directions
    2) you can log a route for download to a computer for time/speed/elevation and then later re-track the same route
    3) you can use it for safety/if you get lost by marking some important point and/or usuing it with a map.

    the ones with downloadable maps are more expensvie and still kind of new - in general unless you only want to stay on roads, don't bother with the maps as MTB trails won'ts be on them for a while (if ever). for off-road you can either buy e-maps or you can scan and calibrate your own from topos. Garmin sells a bike handlebar mount and i've seen many home-made ones.

    the GPS is cool on the bike. the disadvantages are: not cheap as you need the unit, plus software (there is some freeware but most costs $50 or more), plus maps and electronic maps can be expensive (for me it's $50 for souther Germany, another $60 for Austria and $80 for Switerzland and there are none for Italy --- so almost $200 to cover my biking terrain). you also need to have some interest in "gadgets" as it takes some tech-playing with the software, map calibration, route downloading, etc.

    some time here i will get mine GPS set up for the bike - i.e. buy mapping software and electronic maps as well as the computer connection (sold separately for most units) and a handlebar mount. i am a bike guide an i would like to ride/plot my routes and then download it into the unit to make extra-sure i know the route for my tours. making a wrong turn as a guide is not a cool thing.

    lastly: they require lots of batteries so for touring it is not so good. buy NiMH rechargable batteries but even so you only get 10-30 hours depending on the unit, obviouly not long enough for a tour (i am guiding an 8-day tour in August, but probably not using the GPS)
    why drive when you can ride?
    now a fully certified German MTB Guide! (DAV)

  21. #21
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2003
    Location
    Netherlands
    Posts
    102
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    I'm narrowing down my choice to two units (this may change with more information) - the Garmin eTrex Legend Europe and the Magellan Platinum.

    I want to check these out in the store and that's my next plan. These are costing more than I really wanted to spend. I rec'd extra money from the IRS this year (I forgot to take the personal deduction) and rec'd an additional $800 or so.

    Nathank, thanks for your info! I may ask you more questions to pick your brain.

    Thanks!!!!

  22. #22
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2002
    Location
    mass
    Posts
    942
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    The garmin E-Map that I have, I paid 189.00 for it at Dicks sporting goods. I didn't get the one that included the map cd, I didn't think I would need it, and I was right. The base unit does just what I need, it has a base map in it that I can zoom out when in a wooded area and reference a nearby road, it marks my trail as I go so I can follow it back to the car. The tracks are savable so I can use them in the future. The unit is about 2" wide X 4" long and about 3/4" thick and weighs 4 oz. I carry it in my hydra-pack, I have a net pocket on the pack that works well for this.
    Achieve your goals: Attitude is everything:

  23. #23
    Member
    Join Date
    Dec 2002
    Location
    Frankfort KY
    Posts
    51
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Originally posted by davehorne
    I'm narrowing down my choice to two units (this may change with more information) - the Garmin eTrex Legend Europe and the Magellan Platinum.

    I want to check these out in the store and that's my next plan. These are costing more than I really wanted to spend. I rec'd extra money from the IRS this year (I forgot to take the personal deduction) and rec'd an additional $800 or so.

    Nathank, thanks for your info! I may ask you more questions to pick your brain.

    Thanks!!!!

    Try this link. I have had good luck here.

    http://www.gpsnow.com/gmetlg.htm
    Robert Tankersley

  24. #24
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2001
    Location
    England
    Posts
    12,399
    Mentioned
    3 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    I did a project a couple of years ago on the digital map market. In the US, map data is sold by the US Geological Survay at distribution cost. In Europe, it is usually sold at a profit to the mapping agency, so is too expensive to play with.

  25. #25
    Banned.
    Join Date
    Aug 2001
    Posts
    616
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    I have a Garmin Etrex Legend. It has a decent background map of the Americas in its stock memory. This map includes major national and state roads, towns and cities, and other major landmarks.

    I have the Garmin handlebar mount for the thing, too.

    I don't think anyone needs a GPS for road riding. A liftetime of road riding, including some long tours in foreign countries, never found me lost with the older technology of paper maps, attention, and very occasionally a compass.

    Off-road riding and backcountry hiking, on the other hand, might make better use of the GPS. The unit provides a check on mental notes of landmarks and the use of maps. You can set waypoints on the thing and it will instantly tell you distance and direction to any waypoint from your present location. So, a GPS provides a mark-and-forget convenience when it comes to moving away from the car, or the bike, or whatever. (Not that you ought to make a practice of this sort of thing when you need to find your way back to the car. You can always drop a GPS, or get it wet, and then you're back to the 19th century.) I like taking it camping, too.

    GPS measurements when riding a bike slightly underestimate your riding distances. This is because the unit will connect points along your route with straight lines. In fact, you travel in a slightly wavey path. The GPS _shouldn't_ agree exactly with your cyclometer if each is calibrated correctly. The error can be 1% or more without any equipment problems.

    You can use a GPS in a commercial airplane. If you hold up to the window it will find sufficient satellites for a lock. My Etrex tracks speed and altitude of commercial planes very well, though in theory it's not supposed to be very good above 350 mph. Yet commercial aircraft will travel over 500 mph and my Etrex keeps accurate accounts.

    I really like mine, but in all honesty I'd have to put it in the expensive toy category for all but mountain biking in unusually remote areas.

Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •