Advertise on Bikeforums.net



User Tag List

Results 1 to 21 of 21
  1. #1
    Senior Member mike's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2000
    Location
    Snowy midwest
    Posts
    5,392
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Have you ever been burnt by a hot chainring?

    I was going on a tour awhile back and had an unusual experience. It was a HOT day - over 100 F mercury. The heat was glaring off the road.

    We were riding pretty hard which may have had something to do with it, but when we stopped for a break, my calf touched my chainring. The chainring was HOT and it burned my calf to the point that I got a perfect chainring blister burn.

    It looked cool after the blister popped and it turned into a red-brown chainring scab.

    I thought this was very unusual. Has it happened to anybody else or have you heard of it?
    Mike

  2. #2
    Trans-Urban Velocommando ax0n's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    Lenexa, KS
    My Bikes
    06 Trek 1200 - 98 DB Outlook - 99 DB Sorrento
    Posts
    2,400
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    It's not unusual for any type of metal to be hot enough to cause a burn if it's out in the sun. Usually, air moving past it should keep temperatures down a bit, but the road surface itself can get to 130, 140+ degrees. Metal, especially painted or anodized dark colors, can get even hotter, and metal transfers heat very quickly.

    I haven't been burned by a chainring, but I've been burned by the hood of a car in the Kansas sun, and it doesn't even get that hot around here.
    ax0n: Geeky and bikey
    My latest tip: Carrying your laptop
    My latest geeky project: Ethernet-testing cuff links

  3. #3
    rebmeM roineS JanMM's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Location
    Indiana
    My Bikes
    RANS V3, RANS V-Rex, RANS Screamer
    Posts
    11,454
    Mentioned
    2 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    If water at 120+ degrees can cause a scalding, then it would seem that skin is at risk for burn injury by contact with anything at a higher temperature.

  4. #4
    No Rocket Surgeon eubi's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    Corona and S. El Monte, CA
    My Bikes
    Cannondale D600, Dahon Speed T7
    Posts
    1,648
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Can't say that I have.

    It gets hot in the summer here too. Sometimes, I have to keep my tools in a bucket of water to keep them cool. I usually can't work past 11:00AM in the summer anyway.
    Fewer Cars, more handlebars!

  5. #5
    Senior Member mike's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2000
    Location
    Snowy midwest
    Posts
    5,392
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by eubi
    Can't say that I have.

    It gets hot in the summer here too. Sometimes, I have to keep my tools in a bucket of water to keep them cool. I usually can't work past 11:00AM in the summer anyway.
    Wow, I can't even imagine that; Keeping tools in a bucket of water to keep them cool. Holy smokes! What kind of electric drill do you use?

    Seriously, that is just incredible. Thanks for sharing that kind of lifestyle experience. Southern California is it? Boy, "Some Like It Hot"
    Mike

  6. #6
    No Rocket Surgeon eubi's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    Corona and S. El Monte, CA
    My Bikes
    Cannondale D600, Dahon Speed T7
    Posts
    1,648
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by mike
    Wow, I can't even imagine that; Keeping tools in a bucket of water to keep them cool. Holy smokes! What kind of electric drill do you use?

    Seriously, that is just incredible. Thanks for sharing that kind of lifestyle experience. Southern California is it? Boy, "Some Like It Hot"
    Hahaha. Got me on that one! I keep the power tools in a propane powered refrigerator

    Hope the burn heals quickly...but I bet it looks cooool!
    Fewer Cars, more handlebars!

  7. #7
    Senior Member kf5nd's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2004
    Location
    Houston, TX 77095
    My Bikes
    Specialized Sequoia Elite, Schwinn Frontier FS MTB, Centurion LeMans (1986)
    Posts
    1,470
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    I got a burn from metal tools lying out in the sun when it was 104 F in the middle of the summer once. Never again!

  8. #8
    Senior Member hotbike's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    Long Island, New York
    My Bikes
    a lowrider BMX, a mountain bike, a faired recumbent, and a loaded touring bike
    Posts
    2,547
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    That chainring may have been a lot hotter than 100 deg.

    You have to take into account the heat generated by FRICTION.

    From your description, you didn't have enough oil on the chain.

    If you had more oil on the chain, you would have seen a black, greasy mark on your calf, not the red blister you described.

    Riding hard definitely had something to do with the temperature of the chainring. Without oil, metal on metal friction can create lots of heat.

  9. #9
    You know you want to. Eatadonut's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2005
    Location
    Norman, Oklahoma
    My Bikes
    Pinarello Prince, 1980's 531 steel fixie commuter, FrankenMTB
    Posts
    1,896
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    I'm gonna disagree with hotbike - I doubt there's all that much friction between chainring and chain, or you'd be dying from the squeaking.

    But I've ridden several summers in Texas, and the sun will turn your bike into a weapon. I burned my ankle at a stoplight once when I unclipped and let my leg rest against the crank.
    Weather today: Hot. Humid. Potholes.

  10. #10
    No Rocket Surgeon eubi's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    Corona and S. El Monte, CA
    My Bikes
    Cannondale D600, Dahon Speed T7
    Posts
    1,648
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by hotbike

    Riding hard definitely had something to do with the temperature of the chainring. Without oil, metal on metal friction can create lots of heat.
    Good point, but the idea of using a chain is less friction. If the chain were unlubed enough to create this much heat, the bike would be very hard to pedal!
    Fewer Cars, more handlebars!

  11. #11
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Location
    Middle of the road, NJ
    Posts
    2,130
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    You burned a 'rookie mark' into your leg?

  12. #12
    You know you want to. Eatadonut's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2005
    Location
    Norman, Oklahoma
    My Bikes
    Pinarello Prince, 1980's 531 steel fixie commuter, FrankenMTB
    Posts
    1,896
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by leob1
    You burned a 'rookie mark' into your leg?
    Never understood why it was called the rookie tattoo. I've never considered a small grime spot on my right calf a big enough annoyance to stop leaning against my bike, anymore than I would stop walking across the grass because it gets dirt on my shoes.
    Weather today: Hot. Humid. Potholes.

  13. #13
    Two H's!!! TWO!!!!! chephy's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Location
    Toronto, ON
    Posts
    4,163
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    No, I've never been burnt by a chainring.

    But thanks for reminding me of the summer.

  14. #14
    Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Posts
    41
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Wow that's hot! but I'm not experiencing yet here in our country.

  15. #15
    Senior Member mike's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2000
    Location
    Snowy midwest
    Posts
    5,392
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by hotbike
    That chainring may have been a lot hotter than 100 deg.

    You have to take into account the heat generated by FRICTION.

    From your description, you didn't have enough oil on the chain.

    If you had more oil on the chain, you would have seen a black, greasy mark on your calf, not the red blister you described.

    Riding hard definitely had something to do with the temperature of the chainring. Without oil, metal on metal friction can create lots of heat.
    Yes, the chainring was for sure more than 100 degrees because the ambient temperature was over 100 degrees.

    Of course, I had a grease mark on my leg too, but when I washed it off, I had burn blister in the shape of the chainring.

    I know what you mean about lubrication, but this was a tour, so I oiled the chain before the trip.

    I wonder how hot the chainring could have gotten?
    Mike

  16. #16
    Senior Member digger's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2002
    Location
    Nova Scotia Canada
    My Bikes
    Cervelo RS. Marinoni touring bike. Kona Tanuki. Specialized Harrock (commuter). Raleigh (early 80s) Super Gran Prix.
    Posts
    1,610
    Mentioned
    5 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by mike
    I was going on a tour awhile back and had an unusual experience. It was a HOT day - over 100 F mercury. The heat was glaring off the road.

    We were riding pretty hard which may have had something to do with it, but when we stopped for a break, my calf touched my chainring. The chainring was HOT and it burned my calf to the point that I got a perfect chainring blister burn.

    It looked cool after the blister popped and it turned into a red-brown chainring scab.

    I thought this was very unusual. Has it happened to anybody else or have you heard of it?
    Not on a chainring, but....

    I rode the Cabot Trail in Nova Scotia last summer (15% grades) and at the bottom of a 8km downhill I stopped to see how hot my rims were...

    Holyfrickinjeez that hurt......
    Originally posted by Bones_McBones: Wow Digger, wow! You've earned my respect.... I know ashoposo got werked up. You are the gutter pig of Trollheim.

  17. #17
    married to the bike Halfstep's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Location
    Grand Ledge
    Posts
    95
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    I never burned myself that bad, but yeah, I used to get singed all the time by various parts on my bike when I lived in the Mohave Desert as a kid. Our first summer there, it hit 133F. In the shade. The other thing we learned REAL quick: NEVER, NEVER, NEVER touch the metal part of the seatbelt when you're putting it on. The plastic is there for more than just looks when the inside of a car can exceed 140F.
    "If people insist on rowing or jogging or bicycling, can't we at least get them to deliver the mail?" -- Bill Hall, Lewiston, Idaho, Tribune

  18. #18
    Immoderator KrisPistofferson's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2004
    Location
    POS Tennessee
    My Bikes
    Gary Fisher Simple City 8, Litespeed Obed
    Posts
    7,596
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    My biggest heat-related mechanical problem is sidewall cracking due to excessive heat. I love Pasela TG, but the summer here really cuts their life short, it seems.
    Quote Originally Posted by Bikeforums
    Your rights end where another poster's feelings begin.

  19. #19
    Al noisebeam's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2004
    Location
    AZ
    My Bikes
    Cannondale SuperSix, Lemond Poprad. Retired: Jamis Sputnik, Centurion LeMans Fixed, Diamond Back ascent ex
    Posts
    13,893
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    An AZ DOT study on asphault longevity I read a while back found that when the ambient temp is 110F, the surface temp of the asphault can be as high as 180F.
    I've found black break levers, black top tube of bike to be too hot to touch while commuting home in 118F (shade temp) while in full sun. I quickly learned not to lean top tube of bike into inside of thigh while waiting for a light to change.
    But I have never been burned. Severe burns can occur to folks who walk barefoot, even momentarily on pavement in such temps.
    Al

  20. #20
    Senior Member Paul L.'s Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2002
    Location
    Arizona, USA
    My Bikes
    Mercier Corvus (commuter), Fila Taos (MTB), Trek 660(Got frame for free and put my LeMans Centurian components on it)
    Posts
    2,601
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Yes I remember it well. I had tracked Dr. Cager to his all but innaccessible secret lair. Thinking I had the drop on him I was ambushed and taken into his garage of gas guzzling gargantuan SUVs. Strapped into a seat and unable to move he began to interrogate me.
    "Tell me how to defeat the evil League of American Bicyclists and I will let you go Bicycle Man!" he said!
    "No never! I will never betray the League of American Bicyclists Dr. Cager!" I retorted and spit on him in an ironic twist.
    "Fine" he said, We have ways of making you talk he said as he brandished a red hot chainring from my very own bike.......

    Is this the end for Bicycle Man? Will the SUV wielding Dr. Cager triumph in his evil plan to defeat the LAB? Stay tuned for the next episode, "a fist full of chainring fury". Same bike time, same bike channel.
    Sunrise saturday,
    I was biking the backroads,
    lost in the moment.

  21. #21
    Senior Member GaryA's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    Canby, Oregon
    My Bikes
    Gary Fischer mtb, Specialized Allez, Cannondale Jekyl, Trek 8700, Motobecane Sprint (just ordered)
    Posts
    189
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by leob1
    You burned a 'rookie mark' into your leg?
    I was thinking it would make a b*tchin scar.
    2007 Motobecane Sprint
    2003 Cannondale Jekyll
    1992 Specialized Allez
    1991 Trek 8700

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •