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  1. #1
    Senior Member Falchoon's Avatar
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    Tubes - repair or replace?

    I don't have much luck repairing punctures, they quite often still have a slow leak afterwards so I usually just buy a new tube. Much easier this way, though can get a bit expensive if I have a lot of punctures. What do you do?
    If at first you don't succeed, then skydiving definitely isn't for you.

  2. #2
    Senior Member steversk's Avatar
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    I usually patch the tubes once I get home and then put them back in my bag. That way, I always have a few spare tubes, just in case.

  3. #3
    Kev
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    I agree I patch them, after a while you get pretty good at patching tubes. Replacing them all the time would be to expensive. Just practice patching them and don't use those glueless patches.

  4. #4
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    I patch my tubes, but usually replace them when I replace a tire; but since using Specialize Turbo Armadillos for the last 2 3/4 years there has been no need for patching.

    I disagree with Kev's thoughts about glueless patches. I have used glueless patches for 6 years and never had a problem, one tube had as many as 13 glueless patches and they all held just fine with the Park brand. The secret to any patch job whether glue or glueless is to make sure the tube is sanded in an area a bit larger than the patch than, if using glue, spread the glue out larger than the patch and make sure the glue is tacky but not wet before appling the patch (the glue should change from a shiny look when you first put it on to a dull haze look then use a finger nail and touch an area that the patch will not contact and it should have a tacky feeling). I prefer the glueless patches now because there is no glue tube to dry out on you, the patch is actually a bit thinner, and it's quicker to fix a flat since there is no glueing and no waiting for the glue to dry.

    I also aways patch on the road if possible before using a spare tube because I can fix the tube as fast as replacing it if I know where the leak is and I don't have to compact the tube down (get all the air out) to stuff it back into the seat bag. Fixing a flat can be fast if you know where the leak is just remove one side of the tire from the rim about halfway, pull the tube out just enough to expose the puncture, roughen then apply patch and stuff back in. If you don't know where the leak is just fill the tire with air and you can usually find it, if not then you may have to remove the tube entirely. At this point you have two choices, replace the tube. or pump air into the tube and try finding the leak.

    Don't forget after you fix the flat and before you reinstall everything to run your hand inside around that section of the tire and check for foreign objects, and if you know where the hole is in the tire make sure the object is not still stuck in the tire.

  5. #5
    Chopped Liver Dannihilator's Avatar
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    I put a new tube in, slime scares me.
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  6. #6
    aka old dog greywolf's Avatar
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    As froze says, Ive just fitted a new Armadillo turbo on the back , hope it lasts a bit longer than the Gatorskin I had (3 mths !!!!)I put the old tube back , funds for bike stuff are getting lean !!!. When ive fixed a punture on the side of the road when its dark or wet or useualy both !!! my patch seems to develop a slow leak ! or I tear the valve seating when pumping up the tyre , I useualy then throw a little temper tantram at the side o the road !
    :D
    dont worry be happy ????

  7. #7
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    Since most of my punctures seem to happen when it is dark , cold and wet, I replace the inner by the roadside, and patch the tube when Im back home. If I get a second puncture I have to patch outdoors, but its not something I would choose to do.
    I carry self-adhesive patches with me, but use a trad glue and patch kit at home. Its not difficult to do a reliable repair. I have iner tubes with 7/8 patches and they last for years. The only problems may occur in really hot conditions, but thats not a worry in the UK.

  8. #8
    Formerly Known as Newbie Juha's Avatar
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    Maybe I'm cheap, but I patch, except in winter. In my experience it is not a reliability issue. It is easy to do even outside and if you do it properly, it will hold. I have no experience of glueless patches.

    The only thing I'm worried about is the excess glue around the patch having adverse effect on the outer tyre. Any thoughts on this?

    --J
    To err is human. To moo is bovine.

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  9. #9
    To infinity and beyond Anders K's Avatar
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    I always carry two spare tubes with me, but almost never gets a puncture ...until this is written
    Last edited by Anders K; 05-09-03 at 09:16 AM.
    Eat my saddle ;-)

  10. #10
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    Originally posted by Juha
    ....The only thing I'm worried about is the excess glue around the patch having adverse effect on the outer tyre. Any thoughts on this?

    --J
    In a puncture repair kit you normally get some chalk, and a rough spot on the packaging. You then rub the chalk on this rough spot to create a chalk powder, and apply the powder to the excess glue. This will dry the glue and negate any adverse effects.

    Hope that helps, Portent.

  11. #11
    Formerly Known as Newbie Juha's Avatar
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    Yes, some repair kits have chalk and some don't. I was just wondering if the glue is somehow different in those kits that don't include the piece of chalk, or is it just that some manufacturers don't give a rat's @ss? I have never had a problem, so maybe I am worrying for nothing.

    And Anders K's post reminds me of some earlier thread, as there definitely should be a "Bad Karma" -forum. Perhaps as a sub-forum to "Bicycle Mechanics". All of us who participate in this thread are jinxing ourselves.



    --J
    To err is human. To moo is bovine.

    Who is this General Failure anyway, and why is he reading my drive?


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  12. #12
    Guest
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    Hey-

    Can you tell me about the Specialize Turbo Armadillos? Do they prevent flats more effectively or something? Because I am looking to "fortify" my back wheel- I had to patch my tube for the rear tire the other day, and I had a mother of a time getting that freakin' wheel back on afterwards... the stays had moved closer together while I was patching it, and I spent a looooooong time wrestling them apart and messing with the derauelleur in the process. All with no bike stand either, but at least it got fixed! Sheesh!

    Koff

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    Originally posted by Koffee Brown
    Hey-

    Can you tell me about the Specialize Turbo Armadillos? Do they prevent flats more effectively or something?
    Armadillos just dont flat. I have a pair of turbos that were hand me downs from my mom's old commuter. They are at least 3 years old, cant even guess how many miles they have seen, and have not ever flatted. I am going to have to replace these soon because bits of tread are coming off... they are still going strong though...

  14. #14
    Mr. Cellophane RainmanP's Avatar
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    Another step that really helps make sure you get a good patch is to wipe the area with alcohol before applying the cement. This makes sure there is no dust or grease to interfere with adhesion.
    If it ain't broke, mess with it anyway!

  15. #15
    aka old dog greywolf's Avatar
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    Originally posted by Koffee Brown
    Hey-

    Can you tell me about the Specialize Turbo Armadillos? Do they prevent flats more effectively or something? Because I am looking to "fortify" my back wheel- I had to patch my tube for the rear tire the other day, and I had a mother of a time getting that freakin' wheel back on afterwards... the stays had moved closer together while I was patching it, and I spent a looooooong time wrestling them apart and messing with the derauelleur in the process. All with no bike stand either, but at least it got fixed! Sheesh!

    Koff
    I sincerly hope so Koffee ,I just forked out NZ$ 54 . for one for my back wheel I reckon you could just about ride it flat its so robust. I thought it might be hard to fit but it went on OK. glad you got your wheel back in ok:thumbup: Try setting your back gears on the smallest cog before taking out the wheel, makes it easier to replace , works for me anyway.
    :D
    dont worry be happy ????

  16. #16
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    Ok, so I checked through the Nashbar and the Supergo magazines, but I didn't see the tires. Do you have a website I can go to where I will find the tires?

    Koff

    P.S. Yes, I know to change the gears now... it was in the highest cog when I was changing the tire, which didn't help much!

  17. #17
    Wood Licker Maelstrom's Avatar
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    Replace...I pop a tube so infrequently it doesn matter

  18. #18
    You need a new bike supcom's Avatar
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    Armadillos are good stuff. Get them direct from Specialized at www.specialized.com. The Turbo Armadillos are what you want for a road bike. $29.99 each plus shipping.

  19. #19
    riding a Pinarello Prince orguasch's Avatar
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    last year I had a handfull of flats, but since I change to a new tire, "Michellin Giro" I had only one flat that is knock on wood,, my practice I would patch until five holes on one inner ube in excess of that I just chuck it
    "Racso", the well oiled machine;)

  20. #20
    wonderer, wanderer gonesh9's Avatar
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    Flat tires are the one thing that really pisses me off about road bikes. Mountain biking I hardly ever get a flat, and when I do it's because of landing straight on a very pointy rock. Road biking I get a flat just riding anywhere in a 5 mile radius of a broken piece of glass. Also, replacing a flat on my mountain bike is a breeze. Replacing a flat on my road bike is an obnoxious conspiracy against me. It takes all three of my tire changing levers just to get the tire off. What is up with that? Also, do Armadillos come in larger (32) size for touring bikes?

  21. #21
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    Originally posted by greywolf
    I sincerly hope so Koffee ,I just forked out NZ$ 54 . for one for my back wheel I reckon you could just about ride it flat its so robust. I thought it might be hard to fit but it went on OK. glad you got your wheel back in ok:thumbup: Try setting your back gears on the smallest cog before taking out the wheel, makes it easier to replace , works for me anyway.
    $54 dollars? That's obsurd, you could have bought it directly from Specialize over the internet for $29 and I got mine for that price from my LBS.

    Keep one thing in mind though, these tires are not flat proof, what they are is the most flat resistent tire on the market today.

  22. #22
    Scooby Snax
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    Originally posted by RainmanP
    Another step that really helps make sure you get a good patch is to wipe the area with alcohol before applying the cement. This makes sure there is no dust or grease to interfere with adhesion.
    that is the most absurd waste of beer!!

  23. #23
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    That's $54 NZ dollars.... converting what you paid for the tires of USD $29 to the NZD is $50.33, which is pretty close to what Froze paid. I heard in NZ, things tend to get pricey there, so paying $54 NZD is not a bad deal after all....

    Koffee

  24. #24
    aka old dog greywolf's Avatar
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    Originally posted by Koffee Brown
    That's $54 NZ dollars.... converting what you paid for the tires of USD $29 to the NZD is $50.33, which is pretty close to what Froze paid. I heard in NZ, things tend to get pricey there, so paying $54 NZD is not a bad deal after all....

    Koffee
    Thats right Koffee it is a good deal, all the other LBS,s here want NZ$69 for the same tyre
    :D
    dont worry be happy ????

  25. #25
    Project 1 , 8000 & T100 SinGate's Avatar
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    I keep a spare tube and patch kit with me on my road bike and on my Mountain bike. But here's the thing, the tube gets a hole worn in it from sitting in my seatpack and is useless when I go to use it.

    I have never gone flat on my mountain bike but have had a few flats with my road bike.

    What I do it toss the first flat tube (after all bikers are made of money )and repair the second with the patch kit if I get a second flat.

    Oh, and now I'm leaving the spare tube in the original box and putting it in my seat pack; hopefully that will help keep it safe.
    Oh to be just a little bit faster....

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