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  1. #1
    Member geeyoff's Avatar
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    What grease for an aluminum seat post?

    Hi. I've got an old beater steel frame and an aluminum seat post. Can anybody recommend a particular type of grease to use on the seat post? Like a brand or product name? I glanced at Nashbar and Performance Bike, and there are a lot of products available, but I don't really know the differences between any of them. I'm new to all this. :-)

    My LBS sold me some chain lube; would that work well enough? It's "Boeshield T-9 Rust & Corrosion Protection Waterproof Lubricant." It sprays out of the can kind of liquidy, but it claims to contain petroleum distillates, so I don't know...

    Thanks.

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    Senior Member brice520's Avatar
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    for a great all around grease Park's polylube is a foolproof route. Don't use T-9 as a rust inhibitor for seat posts / bolts, as you will be disappointed. I'm fairly sure T-9 is a wax based "oil substitute" lubricant. It's wonderful for lubing cables, freewheels and chains, but not for a tool to be used in place of grease.

    Just brush on a little polylube, or spread a thin layer with your finger inside the top of the seat tube before you insert your seat post.

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    Senior Member Sci-Fi's Avatar
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    Anti-seize compound or dielectric grease. Regular or Marine grease and Boeshield is fine too. Just reapply every so often.

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    Senior Member Retro Grouch's Avatar
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    I grease the inside of the frame's seat tube rather than the seatpost itself. Any excess is pushed down into the seat tube rather than scraped off on the outside of the frame.

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    You can use any type of grease you have laying around including automotive grease! It doesn't need to be fancy or expensive since nothing is moving. The only job the grease is going to do is to keep the Aluminum and Steel from corroding thus making it a hassle to later to move the seat.

    Put a thin layer on both the seat tube and the seat post, then insert, then just wipe off the excess when done. The grease will naturally keep water out, but there isn't much space there anyway for a lot of water to leak down into the frame. Applying heavy amount of grease won't do a bit of good because when you slide the seatpost in any grease that won't fit between the seatpost and seat tube will be pushed out anyway thus leaving a very thin coat of grease.

  6. #6
    Senior Member cosmo starr's Avatar
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    use Pam

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    I use white lithium grease purchase at auto stores,etc. Never had a problem.

  8. #8
    Senior Member onbike 1939's Avatar
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    In order to stop the corrosion which occurs when steel is in contact with aluminium use a copper grease (anti-slip). Any Auto-store will sell you this. Normal grease won't do it and the consequences of a stuck seat-post can be a right swine.

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    biked well well biked's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by onbike 1939
    In order to stop the corrosion which occurs when steel is in contact with aluminium use a copper grease (anti-slip). Any Auto-store will sell you this. Normal grease won't do it and the consequences of a stuck seat-post can be a right swine.
    Anti-seize certainly isn't going to hurt anything for this application, but it's not necessary. Most any grease in the seat tube will prevent galvanic corrosion between aluminum and steel. I actually spoke to an engineer once at Thomson about this, and he said the only time anti-seize is really necessary on a bicycle is when titanium is involved, such as an aluminum seatpost in a titanium frame, bottom bracket threads in a titanium frame, etc.-

  10. #10
    Humvee of bikes =Worksman Nightshade's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by well biked
    Anti-seize certainly isn't going to hurt anything for this application, but it's not necessary. Most any grease in the seat tube will prevent galvanic corrosion between aluminum and steel. I actually spoke to an engineer once at Thomson about this, and he said the only time anti-seize is really necessary on a bicycle is when titanium is involved, such as an aluminum seatpost in a titanium frame, bottom bracket threads in a titanium frame, etc.-

    Poppycock! Anti-seize will not dry out like any grease will in time which is just one reason
    that anti-sieze it the best product for this job. There is also "compression" packing that happens
    inside the joint. Grease will squeeze out where anti-sieze will compress then stop holding the load.

    Ever homeshop should have a can of good quality anti-sieze but if you're to cheap then grease will have
    to do but don't whine & b!tch when the joint freeze up stuck tight!
    My preferred bicycle brand is.......WORKSMAN CYCLES
    I dislike clipless pedals on any city bike since I feel they are unsafe.

    Originally Posted by krazygluon
    Steel: nearly a thousand years of metallurgical development
    Aluminum: barely a hundred, which one would you rather have under your butt at 30mph?

  11. #11
    Senior Member onbike 1939's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by well biked
    Anti-seize certainly isn't going to hurt anything for this application, but it's not necessary. Most any grease in the seat tube will prevent galvanic corrosion between aluminum and steel. I actually spoke to an engineer once at Thomson about this, and he said the only time anti-seize is really necessary on a bicycle is when titanium is involved, such as an aluminum seatpost in a titanium frame, bottom bracket threads in a titanium frame, etc.-
    If you believe that then you're in for some grief. Ordinary grease will not prevent the corrosion between steel and aluminium and having spent many hours wrestling to free frozen stems and seatposts I know of what I speak.

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    biked well well biked's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by onbike 1939
    If you believe that then you're in for some grief. Ordinary grease will not prevent the corrosion between steel and aluminium and having spent many hours wrestling to free frozen stems and seatposts I know of what I speak.
    I didn't say it was a bad idea, only that it's unnecessary, which it is. If you want to use anti-seize, go ahead.......And believe it or not, you're not the only one who's encountered stuck seatposts and stems. I have too, only not on any bike where I was the one who installed the seatpost, because I use grease. If you go thirty years without moving the post, maybe it would be a problem. But then again, I just received a 1972 Raleigh International, and I'd bet the seatpost hasn't been touched in decades. The post (an aluminum Campy model) came out smooth as silk. I'd also be willing to bet anti-seize wasn't used when it was installed, just grease more than likely-
    Last edited by well biked; 02-11-07 at 01:01 PM.

  13. #13
    biked well well biked's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Tightwad
    Poppycock! Anti-seize will not dry out like any grease will in time which is just one reason
    that anti-sieze it the best product for this job. There is also "compression" packing that happens
    inside the joint. Grease will squeeze out where anti-sieze will compress then stop holding the load.

    Ever homeshop should have a can of good quality anti-sieze but if you're to cheap then grease will have
    to do but don't whine & b!tch when the joint freeze up stuck tight!
    Calm down dude, if you want to use anti-seize, go ahead-

  14. #14
    Senior Member onbike 1939's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by well biked
    I didn't say it was a bad idea, only that it's unnecessary, which it is. If you want to use anti-seize, go ahead.......And believe it or not, you're not the only one who's encountered stuck seatposts and stems. I have too, only not on any bike where I was the one who installed the seatpost, because I use grease. If you go thirty years without moving the post, maybe it would be a problem. But then again, I just received a 1972 Raleigh International, and I'd bet the seatpost hasn't been touched in decades. The post (an aluminum Campy model) came out smooth as silk. I'd also be willing to bet anti-seize wasn't used when it was installed, just grease more than likely-
    Fine, go ahead then and use what you want. Someone told me that Peanut butter was just as good.

    Breath slowly now and calm down, as it seems quite clear that you're going to have a seizure.

  15. #15
    biked well well biked's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by onbike 1939
    Fine, go ahead then and use what you want. Someone told me that Peanut butter was just as good.

    Breath slowly now and calm down, as it seems quite clear that you're going to have a seizure.
    I think you've confused me with Tightwad, as he was the one who seemed upset to me. I simply responded to your post originally because I knew it wasn't accurate info regarding steel/aluminum. I'm sure we'll all do what we feel best-

  16. #16
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    You say you spent some time with ordinary grease seizing your stuff? How long did this take?

    I've been riding bikes for over 30 years. So what you scream!

    One of my bikes that I junked out about 3 years ago was exposed to salt water, rain and salt air (lived along an ocean) and was left outside in all sorts of weather for about 15 years of it's life and then spent the next 12 years sitting in garages. I had greased the seat post and seat tube with grease when I bought the bike new and never moved the seatpost again after initial seat height adjustments were made of course. 27 years later when I was deciding to restore or junk the bike I removed the seatpost and it came out just fine...no corrosion and the grease was still there.

    So then because of your comments I went down into the basement and attempted to remove my seatpost from my mtb that hasn't been moved since it was new and thats when I greased it as well. Surprise surprise, after 19 years it to came right out with no problems, and the grease was still-well grease! Thanks to this post I had to wipe off the grease and reapply it again before I put it back in, though I don't think I had to do that, I'm just anal that way.

    So again, how long does the corrosion and the drying up of the grease take? 30, 50 years? Mine never have after 19 and 27 years of using just cheap automotive grease.

  17. #17
    Senior Member onbike 1939's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by well biked
    I think you've confused me with Tightwad, as he was the one who seemed upset to me. I simply responded to your post originally because I knew it wasn't accurate info regarding steel/aluminum. I'm sure we'll all do what we feel best-
    Google is your friend.
    Go and look-up "galvanic corrosion" and see what you come up with. Of course it may well be that all of your machinery is exempt form the usual laws of Physics but I doubt it somehow.

  18. #18
    Senior Member Cadfael's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by onbike 1939
    In order to stop the corrosion which occurs when steel is in contact with aluminium use a copper grease (anti-slip). Any Auto-store will sell you this. Normal grease won't do it and the consequences of a stuck seat-post can be a right swine.
    I have used copper grease for years for this job, and never had any problems. I was unsure if it would be okay with an ally frame, but it seems to work just fine.

  19. #19
    biked well well biked's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by onbike 1939
    Google is your friend.
    Go and look-up "galvanic corrosion" and see what you come up with. Of course it may well be that all of your machinery is exempt form the usual laws of Physics but I doubt it somehow.
    What you'll probably find in doing a search for galvanic corrosion is a lot of info about marine applications, namely boats in saltwater. So if you keep your bikes in the sea, then yeah, definitely use anti-seize. As for my bikes, I've always had steel bikes, always used grease on the seatposts, and never had one get stuck. It seems silly to me that we're even discussing this, considering most every steel bicycle has a greased seatpost when it's new, at least it does if it's assembled properly. If I had a titanium bike, I'd use anti-seize, and would advise others to do so as well-
    Last edited by well biked; 02-12-07 at 08:24 PM.

  20. #20
    N_C
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    automotive chassis grease works great, just a dab will do ya

  21. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by N_C
    automotive chassis grease works great, just a dab will do ya
    Automotive grease is all I use on both my bikes the MTB and the road bike as well as the old road bike I junked; they were all steel frames with aluminum seat posts, which I failed to mention in my earlier post.

  22. #22
    N_C
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    Quote Originally Posted by froze
    Automotive grease is all I use on both my bikes the MTB and the road bike as well as the old road bike I junked; they were all steel frames with aluminum seat posts, which I failed to mention in my earlier post.
    I would only use it on the seat post, nothing else. Is that all you used it on?

  23. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by N_C
    I would only use it on the seat post, nothing else. Is that all you used it on?
    I have the old style quill stem and use it where the stem goes into the headset to help keep water out; and I use it for greasing the cars! But otherwise that's it; I forgot I do use on threads. Any grease will work, I happen to use Mobil 1 synthetic grease because that's what I use on my cars...but the grease I used on the bike I junked was just standard automotive wheelbearing grease. The synthetic grease probably lasts longer.
    Last edited by froze; 02-13-07 at 10:27 PM.

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