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  1. #1
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    pedal advice for splay-footed cyclist, multiple bikes

    I've been looking to change my pedal setup but need some advice and recommendations.

    Current setup:
    Road: Shimano SPD-SL (PD-R540) / SIDI Genius Lorica
    Mountain: SPD (PD-M515)/ SIDI Dominator Lorica

    I've got a crazy splay-footed (toes turned out) stance. Even with the cleats cranked *all* the way towards my toes, I'm at the very end of the float of the pedals with both setups.

    My knees seem to be happy, even without available float, as long as my toes can point outward enough.

    I have two reasons that I want to change my setup:
    1. I'm doing more and more long-distance (100+ miles), multi-day road riding, and would like shoes I can walk around in, such as my mountain shoes. I've tried the SPDs on my road bike, but I don't feel "locked in" enough for the road, and I feel like the SPD-SL road pedals give me just a *little* bit more angle out for happy knees.

    2. I'm about to get a 'cross bike, and am worried about clipping out. On my mountain bike, since I'm at the end of the float range, in order to clip out I have to move my foot the *entire* angle of the float, and *then* that little bit more to clip out. I've gotten better at it, but after 3 years I'm still having trouble, and would like to try something else.

    So here are my questions:

    1. Is it unrealistic to hope to find a single cleat system (read: shoes) I can use on all 3 bikes?
    2. Are there some pedal systems that allow setting of the angle of your foot over the pedal?
    3. I've been looking a bit at Crank Bros, but it looks like with the road cleats you can't set the angle of the cleat on the shoe. Is that true? Do the other Crank Bros offer enough of a platform for road riding?

    Any other thoughts or advice on this?

    Thanks!

  2. #2
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    Good questions. I was going to suggest Crank Bros, but looks like you've already checked that out.

    You should also check out Speedplay Frogs. If pure float is what you're after, Speedplay is pretty tough to beat. They'd probably be great road pedals, too.

  3. #3
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    BTW, with Speedplay Zeros you can set fixed or free float. You could set the cleats to fixed and then position them however you find most comfortable to "set the angle of your foot over the pedal" - just be careful about your lower body, especially your knees, if you decide to ride with no float.

    I don't know if the Frogs allow for 'fixed or free' like Zeros do.

  4. #4
    Senior Member gear's Avatar
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    Keep what you have for the road bike; they are the best. I'd get covers for the SPD-SL cleats so you can walk on them. Or I'd get some flip flops or folding shoes to bring with me and keep SPD-SL on my road bike with road shoes.

    Don't make comprimises with your shoes and pedals. Bring something else to walk in.

  5. #5
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    I have one foot that angles out to a somewhat large degree. With my eggbeater cleat on that shoe angled all the way to the outside of the shoe I have no issues. Anyhow, I am looking to convert to a road pedal and road shoe for my new bike and I have yet to decide what pedal to use. Walking is not an issue for what I have planned for the roadie.
    Also, with the same foot I have noticed that I walk on the outside edge of it. This creates issues when it is clipped in while I am pedaling. The end result is that I pedal with the outside part of the ball of that foot. After a bit of research I will be purchasing either lewedges or BG shims to raise the inside of that shoe's insole such that I can use the entire ball of my foot. You may or may not have that issue. Just thought I would throw it out there.

  6. #6
    Elmira>Taiwan>Elmira flatlander_48's Avatar
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    A few things come to mind. Just to be sure, float and the angle your feet need are two different things. You angle the cleat with respect to the shoe to match the natural angle of your feet. The float has to do with any lateral rotation that your feet need as you pedal. Are you saying that you can't get enough adjustment with the cleat such that the natural angle of your feet uses up the available float?

    I have used the Crank Bros. Quattro pedals for about a year. They do have an enlarged platform area. My wife uses the Candy pedals on her road bike. I have 20mm spacers on mine to move the pedals outward. The cleats are mounted to my shoes with as much angle as I can get, but the mounting doesn't allow for a lot of rotation. However, so far I have been able to get just enough rotation to allow my feet to be positioned in something close to their natural alignment.

    I suggest that you have your cleats adjusted by a mechanic before you do anything. Adjusting cleats by yourself (which I have done), can be a very time consuming trial and error task.
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  7. #7
    Senior Curmudgeon FarHorizon's Avatar
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    Somebody ( I don't recall whom ) makes a pedal with a inside-to-outside tilt on the cleat surface. Normally, when toes are significantly splayed out, the foot is also flat, and the leg-bones are partially bowed. This causes the ankle to meet the foot at less than right angles. The geometry also causes the toes to splay out and the foot to "flop over" the instep over time.

    I don't know your geometry, but the above describes mine perfectly. On platform pedals, my feet touch the pedal at the outside of the pedal only. The inside of my shoe never meets the pedal surface.

    I haven't tried the angled pedals personally, because I prefer to ride platforms, but if the pedals sound like they could help you, you might seek them out.

    Good luck!

  8. #8
    Elmira>Taiwan>Elmira flatlander_48's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by FarHorizon
    Somebody ( I don't recall whom ) makes a pedal with a inside-to-outside tilt on the cleat surface. Normally, when toes are significantly splayed out, the foot is also flat, and the leg-bones are partially bowed. This causes the ankle to meet the foot at less than right angles. The geometry also causes the toes to splay out and the foot to "flop over" the instep over time.

    I don't know your geometry, but the above describes mine perfectly. On platform pedals, my feet touch the pedal at the outside of the pedal only. The inside of my shoe never meets the pedal surface.

    I haven't tried the angled pedals personally, because I prefer to ride platforms, but if the pedals sound like they could help you, you might seek them out.

    Good luck!
    Well, 2 out of 3 for me. I don't have bow legs. Could be a difference in how the condition came about. I've had arthritis from childhood.

    I've never seen a pedal as you describe, but there are other means to get the same effect:

    Go To...

    Towards the bottom, look for "Cants/wedges:". Unfortunately there is no picture on the site...
    2005 Ritchey BreakAway (steel)
    Full Campagnolo double compact drivetrain - Chorus 11sp
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    Cateye CC-TR300TW V3
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    Fizik Gobi saddle and bar tape
    BeBop Pedals

  9. #9
    Humvee of bikes =Worksman Nightshade's Avatar
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    Will these pedals resolve your concern??

    http://www.nashbar.com/profile.cfm?c...tform%20Pedals
    My preferred bicycle brand is.......WORKSMAN CYCLES
    I dislike clipless pedals on any city bike since I feel they are unsafe.

    Originally Posted by krazygluon
    Steel: nearly a thousand years of metallurgical development
    Aluminum: barely a hundred, which one would you rather have under your butt at 30mph?

  10. #10
    Senior Member Retro Grouch's Avatar
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    My toes point out considerably on both feet. I also have had more difficulty getting acclimated to clipless pedals than anyone I know. At one point I just about gave up on clipless. I think that the distance I had to kick my heels outward and the resulting angle of my foot caused them to bind up and not release very well at the end of a ride when I was a little tired.

    My son suggested I try the Shimano multi-release, 0 float, cleats and I've never looked back. Most of my bikes have mountain style SPD pedals and my road bike has the old style Ultegra SPD pedals. Actually, I've been reluctant to try a pedal system other than SPD due to the cost involved for both pedals and shoes when I had so much trouble initially.

    Uh - if anybody has a lightly used pair of old style Ultegra SPD pedals, PM me and lets make a deal.

  11. #11
    Senior Member late's Avatar
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