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  1. #1
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    If I were skydiving this morning, I would be dead.

    After nearly 25,000 miles of riding in the last few years, I have convinced myself that I'm not a noob. Well at least that was till today. About 5 miles into my back country ride on my mountain bike I felt the front tire going down. That wasn't the greatest news since it was 30 degrees (F) outside.

    Regardless, i've done the drill many times before so I quickly disassembled the front tire and patched the tube. I used the last of my glue for the patches and tossed it aside. (yes i littered) Soon I was off and riding again. About 1/4 mile later, it dawned on me that I had forgotten to check the tire for debris. (Major rookie mistake!) Oh well, i thought. Surely there is nothing in there.

    About 20 seconds later the front end is beginning to bounce. Crap, she's goin down. Oh well, i thought. I've still got the back up tube and one more CO2 cylinder. So i dismantled the tire again and reinstalled the new tube, and connected the inflator. Whooooooooosh! All of the air left the Co2 cannister but the tire did NOT inflate. Crap!

    After taking everything apart again, i noticed that the tube had a bunch of cuts on the inside edge where it had been folded and riding in my pack all winter. So now, i'm without a tube, without patches and without c02.

    I was about 7 miles from home and decided i would try and slow the leak as much as possible by just sticking a patch minus the glue, over the hole. It had minimal effect, but i was able to pump and ride the rest of the way in with my trusty frame pump. I had to stop and pump 4 times to make it 7 miles. Not fun but better than walking.

    Moral of the story: There are many but mainly make sure you have as many layers of defense as possible. And the next time somebody asks if they should carry Co2, frame pump, or whether to patch or replace the tube, just say YES.

  2. #2
    Time for a change. stapfam's Avatar
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    Many moons ago and we were on a road ride with our MTB's and knobblies. With 8 of us we expected to get punctures and just after passing a newly cut hawthorn hedge- we got the first one. Repaired it and that was a team operation. The thorn was pulled out of the tyre and pumped up with a repaired tube. Before it got back on the bike it was flat. So patch didn't work. Offwith the tyre and new tube put in. Before riding- Flat tyre again. Off with the tyre check the tube and 2 holes in it. Repaired them as it must be a tube that was not repaired from last trip out. Guess what- It went down again. We checked the tyre and no more thorns in it- but one of the riders decided to check the tyre by turning it inside out. There they were. Little pin ****** of thorn that with the tyre turned inside out could be found. Pulled them all out and fitted another new tube. Worked fine- went to start riding and a tyre on another bike was flat. 7 more punctures later and we went home. I think all of us bought new tyres that week just to make certain we had no more thorns.
    How long was I in the army? Five foot seven.


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  3. #3
    SSP
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    It was your karma for littering....that sucks.

    Also, patch kits with glue are old school...the glue's usually dried out, and even if it's not they take longer to install. Get some Park Glueless patches instead (and don't throw down the paper backing!).
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  4. #4
    Senior Member Nermal's Avatar
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    Oh, lordy! I never thought of creased tubes in the pack being subject to failure. Oh well, worrying is what I'm good at.
    Some people are like a Slinky ... not really good for anything, but you still can't help but smile when you shove them down the stairs.

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by SSP
    It was your karma for littering....that sucks.

    Also, patch kits with glue are old school...the glue's usually dried out, and even if it's not they take longer to install. Get some Park Glueless patches instead (and don't throw down the paper backing!).
    We live in different worlds. (Yes. We do. )

    Incident happened somewhere near the X.

    Last edited by Portis; 04-05-07 at 04:26 PM.

  6. #6
    Two H's!!! TWO!!!!! chephy's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by SSP
    It was your karma for littering....that sucks.
    +1.

    Quote Originally Posted by SSP
    Also, patch kits with glue are old school...the glue's usually dried out, and even if it's not they take longer to install. Get some Park Glueless patches instead (and don't throw down the paper backing!).
    -1.

  7. #7
    SSP
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    Quote Originally Posted by Portis
    We live in different worlds. (Yes. We do. )
    And the glueless patches also take up much less room in your seat bag!


    As for different worlds...here's some pics from mine. These are from my annual ride around Mt. Lassen - 104 miles, with about 9500 feet of climbing through Mt. Lassen National Park (about 45 minutes from home).







    Life is Good.
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  8. #8
    SSP
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    Quote Originally Posted by chephy
    -1.
    ???
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  9. #9
    2-Cyl, 1/2 HP @ 90 RPM slvoid's Avatar
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    I always wrap my tubes in a thick sheet of fabric so it doesn't wear through the tube.

  10. #10
    Banned.
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    Quote Originally Posted by slvoid
    I always wrap my tubes in a thick sheet of fabric so it doesn't wear through the tube.
    I think that is a good idea. I've never had that problem before, but that tube had been in there a long time and a lot of miles.

  11. #11
    SSP
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    Quote Originally Posted by slvoid
    I always wrap my tube in a thick sheet of fabric so it doesn't wear through the tube.
    I tried that once, but it reduced the sensation too much. Oh, wait...never mind.
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  12. #12
    Senior Member
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    I keep my spare tube in a plastic bag, bathed in talcum powder.

  13. #13
    Senior Member cosmo starr's Avatar
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    its because you littered

  14. #14
    Cyclo Sapiens babydee's Avatar
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    I carry a patch kit, 2 spare tubes, frame pump, and CO2.

    This has been overkill...except the one day I ripped a valve repairing a flat, and both of my spare tubes had FAULTY valves. Can't remember the brand, but I started getting Continentals after that. I couldn't do anything the repair those tubes (even the first one) and I had to call for a ride.

  15. #15
    Non Tribuo Anus Rodentum and off to the next adventure (RIP) Stacey's Avatar
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    Heh, heh, heh... I travel with AAA.

  16. #16
    Lanky Lass East Hill's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by SSP
    As for different worlds...here's some pics from mine. These are from my annual ride around Mt. Lassen - 104 miles, with about 9500 feet of climbing through Mt. Lassen National Park (about 45 minutes from home).
    We want photos of you going up the cinder cone on that bike, please .

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  17. #17
    Faster but still slow slowandsteady's Avatar
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    Crap, she's goin down
    I don't know why, but this line made me think of this....

    "Ride lots." -- Eddy Merckx

  18. #18
    your god hates me Bob Ross's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Portis
    Whooooooooosh! All of the air left the Co2 cannister but the tire did NOT inflate. Crap!

    I've seen this happen (to other people) two or three times in the past year. Given that, I will never understand the appeal of C02. If you still have to carry a pump for backup, there's no weight savings. Is it really all about time savings? Once you flat, you're out of the race, so I don't see how 60 seconds versus 3 seconds affects the rest of your day's ride. And if you're willing to take a gamble that the C02 will work when you need it, you're...um, well, let's be charitible and say that you "have faith".

  19. #19
    SSP
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bob Ross
    I've seen this happen (to other people) two or three times in the past year. Given that, I will never understand the appeal of C02. If you still have to carry a pump for backup, there's no weight savings. Is it really all about time savings? Once you flat, you're out of the race, so I don't see how 60 seconds versus 3 seconds affects the rest of your day's ride. And if you're willing to take a gamble that the C02 will work when you need it, you're...um, well, let's be charitible and say that you "have faith".
    In the last 15 years, and 45,000+ miles of cycling, I've never been stranded by CO2. I typically carry 3 cartridges, 1 spare tube, and a set of Park glueless patches. Altogether, that kit takes up very little room in my small seat bag.

    With a decent CO2 inflater, the proper procedure is to first put just a little into the tube. That way, if your tube is defective, you'll detect it before you use up the cartridge.

    As for the appeal of CO2 - not having to hang a frame pump on my pretty bike is reason enough for me.
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  20. #20
    your god hates me Bob Ross's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by SSP
    As for the appeal of CO2 - not having to hang a frame pump on my pretty bike is reason enough for me.
    I must grant you that indulgence...not because I agree with it, but because I realize I too (like probably every other cyclist) harbor equally arbitrary and arguably ludicrous priorities about bike aesthetics.

    E.g., I will never use a wired computer with cadence...because I think those wires running along the downtube look like crap!

    Also (and this is a bit more germane to the OP & this thread) I sometimes remove my frame pump and saddlebag (which contains my tubes & tire levers) because I think my bike looks so much cooler without them. Of course, I'm a practical man; I never ride it like this farther than a few miles from home.

  21. #21
    Two H's!!! TWO!!!!! chephy's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by SSP
    ???
    I'm old skool. Patches with glue are better than glueless. Glueless is not reliable. Cannot be good. Will fail. Is a great offense in the eyes of God. They are not right. Wrong. Wrong. Take them away from me!!!

  22. #22
    Senior Member DannoXYZ's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by chephy
    I'm old skool. Patches with glue are better than glueless. Glueless is not reliable. Cannot be good. Will fail. Is a great offense in the eyes of God. They are not right. Wrong. Wrong. Take them away from me!!!
    Yeah, the glueless patches actually use glue to hold the patch on. But it doesn't use vulcanizing fluid to actually fuse the two together. You can peel off a glueless patch later. Try peeling off a patch that's been applied with the "old school" sandpaper & vulcanizing-fluid method and you'll end up tearing the patch or the tube trying to get them apart. The failure-rates of glueless patches is much higher than the older stuff. They're fine for a quick repair on the road, but you really need to follow up with peeling them off later and applying a real patch.

  23. #23
    Mmmmm potatoes idcruiserman's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by SSP
    It was your karma for littering....that sucks.

    Also, patch kits with glue are old school...the glue's usually dried out, and even if it's not they take longer to install. Get some Park Glueless patches instead (and don't throw down the paper backing!).
    IMO glueless patches suck. Rarely a long term fix in my experience.
    Idaho

  24. #24
    Mmmmm potatoes idcruiserman's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by babydee
    I carry a patch kit, 2 spare tubes, frame pump, and CO2.

    This has been overkill...except the one day I ripped a valve repairing a flat, and both of my spare tubes had FAULTY valves. Can't remember the brand, but I started getting Continentals after that. I couldn't do anything the repair those tubes (even the first one) and I had to call for a ride.
    3 tubes here plus patch kit but no CO2. I use a pannier for commuting .

    I haven't had to change a tube since I bought Armadillos.
    Idaho

  25. #25
    Senior Member Paul L.'s Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by SSP
    And the glueless patches also take up much less room in your seat bag!


    As for different worlds...here's some pics from mine. These are from my annual ride around Mt. Lassen - 104 miles, with about 9500 feet of climbing through Mt. Lassen National Park (about 45 minutes from home).







    Life is Good.
    That's just not fair. Sure I get year round riding but, man, that's a cool place to ride.
    Sunrise saturday,
    I was biking the backroads,
    lost in the moment.

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