Advertise on Bikeforums.net



User Tag List

Results 1 to 5 of 5
  1. #1
    Newbie
    Join Date
    Jun 2003
    Posts
    2
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Common Cycling Injuries- What? - How? - Why?

    I'm relatively new to cycling and thought that it would be really good if some of you experienced cyclists out there could please tell me and others the most common cycling injuries that you have suffered from, why you have suffered from them and the easiest way to prevent that injury occuring. You see I have just injured the outside of my knee which the physio has said is a really common injury amongst cyclists, and is caused by the ITB Band tightening up from cycling and then getting inflamed where it crosses over the bone on the outside of the knee. The physio said that the way to prevent this is by stretching the ITB band before and after a ride to stop it getting tight. If I had known this could happen then I would have been doing these stretches on the ITB band right from day one and I could have prevented this injury. So could you experienced cyclists please take a little bit of time and share your experiences to help all of us newer cyclists????? Thanks very much, look forward to your replies.

  2. #2
    Senior Member late's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2002
    Location
    Southern Maine
    Posts
    8,235
    Mentioned
    2 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Hi,
    I had that problem bad with my Cannondale. This is my understanding (which means I could easily be wrong)..... What you need badly is to get the
    right distance between your feet. Riding my Cannondale was agony; when I switched to a cheap hybrid.....no problems. The pedals on the hybrid were set farther apart. I am currently riding a touring/cyclocross bike that is moderately wide. Here are some things I tried......
    1)Knee Savers -metal plugs that screw into the pedals and make them stick out further. These are a last resort.
    2)Get a frame with a higher Q (makes your feet wider apart)
    3)I have this suspicion that clipless pedals help. With clipless you are pulling, and sliding, and lifting, as well as pushing. My knee used to occasionally bow out on every bike. Since I got clipless pedals, that has stopped. I think it helps.
    We are as gods, we might as well get good at it.
    Stewart Brand

  3. #3
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Dec 2002
    Posts
    203
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Originally posted by Flange
    I'm relatively new to cycling...
    Did you get your bike fitted specifically to you? Like take it into a reputable LBS and they have your sit on the bike while it's on a stand and adjust your pedals, seat, stem/bars?

    More than anything else, if you haven't had this done, have it done. You will save yourself a lot of body wear and tear by having your bike properly fit to you.

  4. #4
    1.64x10^6 posts Grendel's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Spring, TX
    Posts
    501
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Well, while we're in the knee area of the dicussion here's some other things to be on the lookout for:
    • Knee pain from pushing too high of a gear; keep your cadence up and spin instead of mashing
    • Knee pain from having the saddle too low; make sure your saddle is properly adjusted
    • Clipless pedals can be hard on the knees if they're not adjusted properly; make sure the cleat is located properly and that there's enough 'float' to allow some lateral movement of your foot

    The good news is that cycling can be good for your knees -- I have bad knees and have found that the strengthening of my legs from riding has stabilized the knees quite a bit.

  5. #5
    Newbie
    Join Date
    Jun 2003
    Posts
    2
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    I have had my bike fit checked out by an experienced Ironman and certified Podiatrist. There doesn't seem to be anything wrong with my setup, I have had orthotics made especially for cycling to keep everything lined up correctly. My biggest problem is that I go too hard and too much too quickly. I tend to rush in and especially when I see results I just want to ride more and more, and get faster. This latest injury came about last weekend after a training week of Monday 2hrs (avg 33 km/h), Wednesday 2hrs (avg 33.4 km/h), Friday 45 minutes on Stationary trainer ILT workout and then I did a 4 hour easy paced ride (avg 31km/h) on Saturday and then a 3 hour ride on hilly terrain on Monday (avg 29km/h). This was done by myself and I also threw some leg weights in there on Tuesday as well. I guess it was way too much, although I thought I was wasn't over doing it as I was using small gears and spinning and on the hills I was using a much easier gear than I could, trying to keep my cadence high.

    I really should have learnt though from my previous history as I come from a rowing background and have had to change to road cycling because of a wrist injury, from over work. I guess I have a pretty good endurance base from rowing and aerobically I can withstand much more work on the bike than I am doing but my muscles and tendons etc really have to be slowly worked into cycling as they are not use to it. I have decided that I will do the Advanced 7 week Training programme from Lance Armstrong's Cycling book, which only involves about 8 - 10 hours of training a week with about 4 hours of that dedicated to recovery rides of 45 minutes or so. Hopefully this won't be too much.

    I'll try to control my impulse to go harder and faster, although when I join a club and start riding with others I'll have a hard time trying to stop myself competing with them in training rides, I really don't like getting beaten by anyone, even in training.

    Anyhow I would really appreciate any advice on preventing those over use injuries as I really want to win some races, and I have to be on the bike to do that. Thanks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •