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  1. #26
    Da Big Kahuna
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    Originally posted by CycleMagic
    No kidding about how dangerous visiting Hawaii can be! I am already homesick. My 16 year old daughter is trying to find a way to go to college there after highschool. I'd go back in a heartbeat....

    I think this thread was about feeling guilty....? gone a bit off topic, sorry!
    So, you feel guilty about getting off topic - therefore you are still on topic! (grin).

    BTW, most of my family lives in NC (Charlotte and Raleigh) or SC.

    Bob

  2. #27
    Every lane is a bike lane Chris L's Avatar
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    Originally posted by stiffee_shane
    I had two people on the same day yell at me, "You're NOT a car!!!". My reply of course was, "No SH*T!"
    WTF is that all about anyway? "You're not a car" indeed! I think it was Allister who once suggested responding with "neither are you."

    Originally posted by CycleMagic
    This is a big problem for me in my job. I evaluate drivers and their fitness to drive. Often I get a client that has been a "good driver" for 50 years, no tickets or accidents, but have declining visual perceptual deficits that they are unaware of, which increases their risk of collision. When this is combined with other problems, it is time to consider alternative transportation. It is hard to convince them that they need to retire from driving when they are unaware of the deficits.
    The other thing that needs to be considered his how much driving they've done (and where) to collect those "no tickets". Think about this: I could get a licence tomorrow and not drive again for 50 years. I'd have no tickets or accidents either - it doesn't necessarily mean I'm a good driver. It makes a pretty compelling case for requiring drivers to have to re-sit their test periodically. OK, I'm drifting off-topic, too. I'll shut up now.
    "I am never going to flirt with idleness again" - Roy Keane
    "We invite everyone to question the entire culture we take for granted." - Manic Street Preachers.
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  3. #28
    Crazy Like a Daisy CycleMagic's Avatar
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    It makes a pretty compelling case for requiring drivers to have to re-sit their test periodically.
    You are right on target there. The problem with that idea, at least in the states, is that re-testing has been aimed at people of a certain age and the lobby groups (AARP et al) are very effective in blocking any kind of movement toward that end.

    We keep preaching that driving is a privilege, not a right, but the way that licenses are renewed (at least in North Carolina), are so easy, that the actual message people get is that once I have my license, I should keep it forever....

    Alright, enough said about that...now I am feeling guilty about getting off target! Liz
    Where am I going?......

    ....and why am I in this handbasket?

  4. #29
    DEADBEEF khuon's Avatar
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    Originally posted by Chris L
    It makes a pretty compelling case for requiring drivers to have to re-sit their test periodically.
    In the aviation world, pilots are required to take a comprehensive biennial flight review (BFR) that forces them to prove they still know what they're doing as if they had just started training. This test can generally run anywhere between two to four hours (one-hour ground and one-hour flight-practical are the minimums) in length. Very few people actually fail a BFR because it's considered a review and thus will often serve as training to work out any deficiencies the pilot may have which is why it can last longer than the minimum two hours. Another reason BFRs are done is to reflect the ever changing FARs (Federal Aviation Regulations) to ensure that pilots are up-to-date on them. I would think requiring something like this (Bienniel Driving Review - BDR?) would certainly improve the base skill level of the general driving community as well. And it should include procedurual tests of the changing driving environments which we'll apt to be subject to and our ability to respond to them... things that might not have been covered in our initial driver's ed classes such as how to deal with cyclists, how to manage distractions such as mobile phones, reading a map, etc. as well as basic pre-drive principles such as how to secure a load so that you're not overhanging timber out the side of your vehicle by three feet or spilling buckets of nails off the cargo bed of your truck when you hit a bump.
    1999 K2 OzM 2001 Aegis Aro Svelte OCP Club Member
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  5. #30
    Junior Member Vman's Avatar
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    Do you ever feel scared that a big truck behind you will run over you? I don't mind about regular passenger cars, but the big 18 wheeler trucks carrying a cargo bin scares the crap out of me when it passes by.

  6. #31
    Every lane is a bike lane Chris L's Avatar
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    Originally posted by CycleMagic
    You are right on target there. The problem with that idea, at least in the states, is that re-testing has been aimed at people of a certain age and the lobby groups (AARP et al) are very effective in blocking any kind of movement toward that end.
    Age is not the only issue here. Some of the worst drivers I've ever seen have been in the 18-25 years age group - people who just generally think they're invincible. I've also seen plenty of middle-aged rednecks who think they own the road exclusively. It's not just the senior citizens who have problems. As far as I'm concerned, we need periodical re-testing for all age groups.

    As I've said before, if I don't keep my skills updated in my profession, I'm out of a job. Why should this be any different.

    Originally posted by Vman
    Do you ever feel scared that a big truck behind you will run over you?
    Not particularly. A passenger car or pick-up driven by a red neck can kill just as effectively (even if they don't mangle your corpse as badly). Not to mention the fact that, generally speaking, truck drivers have a higher competence level than most other drivers on the road due to the fact that they are professional drivers. There are things that concern me a lot more than trucks.
    "I am never going to flirt with idleness again" - Roy Keane
    "We invite everyone to question the entire culture we take for granted." - Manic Street Preachers.
    My blog.
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  7. #32
    Senior Member mechBgon's Avatar
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    I agree, the truck drivers around my region are good. They think ahead, they signal, they drive thoughtfully...

    I've made many trips between Spokane and Pullman on Highway 195. It's about 75mi/120km. I've probably made the trip almost as many times in darkness as during the daytime. During my nighttime trips, I usually used a 2.4W Union dynamo-powered headlight and 0.6W Union taillight, certainly not what anyone could call "powerful."

    Nonetheless, semi drivers encountering my puny 2.4W headlight coming towards them on a pitch-dark highway would dim their high-beam headlights for me most of the time.

    Some of them even had the presence of mind to dim their high-beam headlights when overtaking me from the rear, when they spotted my little taillight and the reflectors that adorned my old Cannondale panniers. That was greatly appreciated by me, since it's a painful experience to look in one's helmet mirror and get blasted by high-beam headlights in the pitch darkness.

    Other US residents have remarked that their regions' truck drivers are not so good. That's a pity

  8. #33
    Has opinion, will express
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    Originally posted by mechBgon
    Yes indeed, these people are in such a hurry, but when they finally arrive at their destination, do they leap from their vehicle and SPRINT to the door of the building? Noooooo.... they circle the parking lot looking for the parking spot that will result in the least possible walking
    I've come in late on this, but...

    mechBgon:



    And
    Originally posted by khuon
    I have a theory that drivers get mad at cyclists not because of the loss of a few precious seconds but because they actually have to utilise driving skill/effort to perform a maneuver to pass the cyclist safely
    My experience yesterday, and on so many other days. How many times do these people have to either cut close (and I am about two metres from the edge of the lane), or overtake when there is on-coming traffic that has to move on to the shoulder/verge to avoid a collision? Even with dual lanes, these overtakers are too lazy to move fully into the adjacent lane.

    I cannot be held responsible for the poor judgment of drivers, when they overtake into on-coming traffic, but I know who'd they blame if a collision did occur.
    Originally posted by CycleMagic
    Depth perception tends to decline with age, so drivers with decades of driving experience may be driving with impaired perception and not realize it. You may notice that these folks follow you at a great distance for a long while, or swing wide around you when they pass; they are having trouble judging where they are in space.
    This very same problem has caused a serious rift between me and my 80yo father. He had a stroke, his reactions are much, much slower as a result, and his eyesight and depth perception are, well, not good even with glasses. However, his long-time family doctor has given him a clearance to continue driving, even though stroke victims of his age usually have their licences revoked (from what I understand).

    My father simply will not surrender his licence. This even though he is a major threat to me and other cyclists and pedestrians. He even had a car-park incident not long after the stroke that caused quite considerable damage to both vehicles.

    He cannot comprehend that even though he and my mother do go to the doctor regularly and obviously need to do the shopping, they don't actually need a car. The car they have is old and costing more and more each year to repair out of meagre pensions, let alone the cost from registration and insurances. They could use taxis to do everything and it still would be cheaper. The supermarket is one kilometre away. The doctor four kilometres. They don't drive anywhere else.

    ====================

    As an on-topic comment, I don't feel guilty. I will move out into the centre of the lane when I know there are on-coming vehicles and that a passing maneouvre by a vehicle from behind may threaten either my well-being and/or the well-being of the on-coming occupants.

    There is nothing more empowering than being on a winding country road, positioning yourself in the lane with a "slow down" hand signal, and to have cars reduce speed from 80 or more km/h to 5km/h. Amazingly, if I give an acknowledgement as they pass (as I make sure I do), they will return the wave, mostly in appreciation. They won't have seen the vehicle that you have already heard for some time until it appears right in front of them. The positioning has to come early and you have to have bright clothing (or lights at night) to give the overtaking driver a chance to see what you are doing.

    In two long rides over the weekend, I had not one car blast its horn at me while I undertook this practice. And to be fair, I had probably 10 vehicles over the whole weekend cut close when overtaking me and with on-coming traffic.

    Mind you, it is not something I would try on a freeway, and I ensure that I don't hold up vehicles behind me unnecessarily.

    If we had more cyclists prepared to act responsibly and predictably in this manner, I feel there would be more acceptance of our presence on the road.

    FWIW

    R
    Dream. Dare. Do.

  9. #34
    go wake forest!!!! bandaidman's Avatar
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    i do try to keep from slowing people down...i am not the king of the road and i try to be courteous towards others when i ride....that includes pedestrians in the park where i log most of my miles...despite the fact some do their best to try to get hit...

    bikers usually come out on the losing side when there is a car/bike disagreement and i do not want to promote any ill will by holding up a bunch of people who are late for work...i try to maximize my safety..that often means keeping out of the way


    aerow..where do you commute from in nashville....i ride alot on west end blvd (currently torn up waiting to be repaved) to get to percy warner park etc....

  10. #35
    Junior Member
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    I have a serious problem with drivers who become so impatient that they try to harm a cyclist. Even if they yell or honk their horn at you, it is potentially dangerous. I'll stop right now before I say some really nasty stuff. To get to the point, go as slow or as fast as you want to. As long as you stay to the right side of the road you aren't doing anything wrong.
    1971 Raleigh Professional / 1975 Witcomb USA (Refurbished by JP Weigle in 2005 / 1983 Motta Personal / 1985 Vitus 979 / 1989 Tommassini Diamante / 1994 Colnago Master Elegant / 1996 Colnago Bi-Titan / 1996 Rivendell / 1997 Mariposa No. 38 (Mike Barry) / 2000 Colnago Master X-Light / 2004 Mariposa No. 11 (Mike Barry)

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