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  1. #1
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    Breaking a D lock?

    How would you break an average D lock?

  2. #2
    * vpiuva's Avatar
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    Should we be calling the police?

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    A car crusher would work or you could put it in the ocean for a hundred years and rust it open.

  4. #4
    tsl
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    The lock testing sites seem to use car jacks, with the hydraulic "bottle" type being preferred.
    My two favorite things in life are libraries and bicycles. They both move people forward without wasting anything.
    The perfect day: Riding a bike to the library.—Peter Golkin


    Lucky for me, I work at a library and bike to work.

  5. #5
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    There is only one way to open a PROPERLY installed d-lock or u-lock (such as the best models from Krytonite, OnGuard, Magnum, and Abus. It is called "the key".

    The experts at "Cycling Plus" and soldsecure.com test all the leading locks. They have found it impossible to open a good u-lock using the portable manual tools actually in use by street crooks.

    But, MOST cyclists don't know how to use a lock. They lock only the front wheel, giving the crook the rest of the bike. Or, they lock the frame, and give the crook its most valuable component, the rear wheel.

    Put the u-lock around the rear wheel, just behind the seat tube AND around the thickest steel pole that fits into the lock. The steel pole should be set in concrete, not dirt, and not merely bolted down. When the rear wheel and the steel post you lock to completely fill the u-lock, there is no room left for effective leverage tools and prying tools. Replace your front quick release with a bolt-on skewer, and use a light "mini" u-lock to secure the front wheel. Also, a BEEFY cable is suitable for securing the front wheel if the rest of the bike is secured with a good u-lock.

    Crooks are lazy. When they see a bike properly locked with a good u-lock, they look for a bike with only a cable lock, or a bike that was improperly locked up.

  6. #6
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    I have heard of several ways. I have never tried them and have no plans to try them.

    * Pour some liquid nitrogen into the keyhole. This makes the lock core brittle and you can shatter it with a pick or something.
    * Saw open the shackle with a hack saw. It'll take a while.
    * If you know how to use locksmithing tools, you can use them to pick the lock.
    * For locks with cylindrical keys, you can supposedly stick the shaft of a cheap pen into it to unlock it. Supposedly, the same works for police handcuffs except that you use a straw instead of a pen shaft.

  7. #7
    Erectible Member pedalMonger's Avatar
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    I crush them into powder with my bare hands.

    On a serious note, if you lost a key, there might be a way to get a replacement from the manufacturer, if it came with a serial number, or has one on the lock someplace. Might have to prove ownership somehow, not sure, this is just something I've heard about.

    Otherwise, one of the methods previous posters have listed, should work (and I hope you're not thief!).

    If you are concerned about how well one will protect your bike, well, it depends on how much you are willing to spend, not all U-locks (or D-locks) are created equal.

  8. #8
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    Eli, luckily for the rest of us, one of the methods you suggest is likely to blind or permanently injure the crook that attempts it (which is why it is NOT used by crooks on the street) and none of the other methods you suggest will work on a 2006 or 2007 model u-lock rated "gold" by soldsecure.com or given a top rating by "Cycling Plus".

    The most interesting finding in the May 2007 tests by "Cycling Plus" was how MUCH u-locks have improved over the years. The OnGuard Bulldog u-lock, which is a low priced "silver" rated u-lock, could NOT be opened by manual tools. I have both the "mini" Bulldog and the "TC mini". Although compact and light (two pounds), they offer about 90% of the security of the ultra-expensive six pound, and eight pound locks.

    www.soldsecure.com/Leisure.htm

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by alanbikehouston
    There is only one way to open a PROPERLY installed d-lock or u-lock (such as the best models from Krytonite, OnGuard, Magnum, and Abus. It is called "the key".

    The experts at "Cycling Plus" and soldsecure.com test all the leading locks. They have found it impossible to open a good u-lock using the portable manual tools actually in use by street crooks.

    But, MOST cyclists don't know how to use a lock. They lock only the front wheel, giving the crook the rest of the bike. Or, they lock the frame, and give the crook its most valuable component, the rear wheel.

    Put the u-lock around the rear wheel, just behind the seat tube AND around the thickest steel pole that fits into the lock. The steel pole should be set in concrete, not dirt, and not merely bolted down. When the rear wheel and the steel post you lock to completely fill the u-lock, there is no room left for effective leverage tools and prying tools. Replace your front quick release with a bolt-on skewer, and use a light "mini" u-lock to secure the front wheel. Also, a BEEFY cable is suitable for securing the front wheel if the rest of the bike is secured with a good u-lock.

    Crooks are lazy. When they see a bike properly locked with a good u-lock, they look for a bike with only a cable lock, or a bike that was improperly locked up.
    What do you think of Tioga D locks? http://www.bikes.com.au/c/124827/1/tioga.html

    Don't you think it is easiest to take the front wheel?

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by Eli_Damon
    I have heard of several ways. I have never tried them and have no plans to try them.

    * Pour some liquid nitrogen into the keyhole. This makes the lock core brittle and you can shatter it with a pick or something.
    * Saw open the shackle with a hack saw. It'll take a while.
    * If you know how to use locksmithing tools, you can use them to pick the lock.
    * For locks with cylindrical keys, you can supposedly stick the shaft of a cheap pen into it to unlock it. Supposedly, the same works for police handcuffs except that you use a straw instead of a pen shaft.
    I thought your last point only worked in the movies. Surely these days police stations are more secure then that?

  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by pedalMonger
    I crush them into powder with my bare hands.

    On a serious note, if you lost a key, there might be a way to get a replacement from the manufacturer, if it came with a serial number, or has one on the lock someplace. Might have to prove ownership somehow, not sure, this is just something I've heard about.

    Otherwise, one of the methods previous posters have listed, should work (and I hope you're not thief!).

    If you are concerned about how well one will protect your bike, well, it depends on how much you are willing to spend, not all U-locks (or D-locks) are created equal.
    I am not a thief. I bought a bottom of the range road bike and an average D lock, Tioga. It should be enough?

  12. #12
    Dances a jig. Mchaz's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by pivoxa15
    I am not a thief. I bought a bottom of the range road bike and an average D lock, Tioga. It should be enough?
    In New York City...Nope. In a town of 3,000 people...most likely. In between...?

  13. #13
    Senior Member Michigander's Avatar
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    Bring back the Sig Test!


    (\__/)
    (='.'=)
    (")_(")

  14. #14
    Administrator Allen's Avatar
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  15. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mchaz
    In New York City...Nope. In a town of 3,000 people...most likely. In between...?
    I thought it would be safer in a city with more people?

  16. #16
    What? Carbon Based's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by pivoxa15
    I thought it would be safer in a city with more people?
    More people=more thieves

  17. #17
    Dances a jig. Mchaz's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Carbon Based
    More people=more thieves
    Yes! And a bigger market to unload the stolen goods. Why do you think Kryptonite's strongest locks are called the New York series?

  18. #18
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    "Saw open the shackle with a hack saw. It'll take a while." Get a titanium blade.
    2000 Montague CX, I do not recommend it, but still ride it.
    Strida 3, I recommend it for rides < 10mi wo steep hills.
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    1996 Birdy, Recommend.
    Wieleder CARiBIKE (folding), decent frame.

  19. #19
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    ~90 seconds with my 3" angle grinder (as seen above) and the roommates D lock was dead. No one asked any questions. Two or three people commented on how awesome the 6' sparks were. If there is power nearby, not much will resist a grinder for long.
    Last edited by VTRoadie; 06-29-07 at 10:52 AM.

  20. #20
    Bike Junkie aadhils's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by VTRoadie
    ~90 seconds with my 3" angle grinder (as seen above) and the roommates D lock was dead. No one asked any questions. Two or three people commented on how awesome the 6' sparks were. If there is power nearby, not much will resist a grinder for long.
    Nice...Steal a bike in broad daylight and people will start commenting on how awesome the 6' sparks are...

  21. #21
    Al noisebeam's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by pivoxa15
    How would you break an average D lock?
    Squirt superglue into keyhole

    Al

  22. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by VTRoadie


    ~90 seconds with my 3" angle grinder (as seen above) and the roommates D lock was dead. No one asked any questions. Two or three people commented on how awesome the 6' sparks were. If there is power nearby, not much will resist a grinder for long.
    Only one word is appropriate for this post: duh.
    Mes compaingnons cui j'amoie et cui j'aim,... Me di, chanson.

  23. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by VTRoadie

    ~90 seconds with my 3" angle grinder (as seen above) and the roommates D lock was dead. No one asked any questions. Two or three people commented on how awesome the 6' sparks were. If there is power nearby, not much will resist a grinder for long.
    Yea. So don't park your bike near light post

    Neistat Brothers NYC video look around 3:00 mark
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5TNTq3nhuh0

  24. #24
    Senior Member DannoXYZ's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by pivoxa15
    What do you think of Tioga D locks? http://www.bikes.com.au/c/124827/1/tioga.html

    Don't you think it is easiest to take the front wheel?
    You can always keep the front-wheel QR. Then take it off when you lock your bike and put the front wheel between the frame and rack. The lock goes around the seat-tube and both wheels. That leaves the QR-skewers for them to steal and the shifters & derailleurs if they happen to be carrying an allen-key set.
    Last edited by DannoXYZ; 06-29-07 at 10:57 PM.

  25. #25
    Erectible Member pedalMonger's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by DannoXYZ
    You can always keep the front-wheel QR. Then take it off when you lock your bike and put the front wheel between the frame and rack. The lock goes around the seat-tube and both wheels.
    Wow, great idea. Wonder why I didn't think of that. *slaps forehead*

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