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Old 06-30-07, 07:42 AM   #1
jorpe
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RE: prescription insoles, WOW what a difference!

I've had prescription insoles for 8 years now for my ridiculously flat feet. I had not ever put them in my Genius 5's while riding. I did this morning on my way home from work. The difference is unbelievable! Every revolution felt a ton stronger. I'm excited, this may be what I've been missing as far as my pedaling technique.
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Old 06-30-07, 10:20 AM   #2
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In the book "Bike For Life", the authors interview a bike fitter who thinks "custom" insoles are crucial to using clip-in pedals safely and in comfort.

But, yikes, the cost. Yet, the cost of not taking care of your feet might be higher.
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Old 06-30-07, 01:15 PM   #3
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it's great even for those of us without the need for prescription orthotics - I use the sidas conformable ones and no more hotspots, sore feet and numb toes - and they cost less than 1/10 of prescription ones

http://www.sidas.com/index.adml?id=3...12&r=437&l=111

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Old 06-30-07, 03:47 PM   #4
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jorpe,

where did you get your prescription from? i'm flat footed and would like to get some good insoles. i switched over to biking because my knees started to hurt from running. i used some off-the shelf insole, but I tend to get some hot spots/blisters from them.
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Old 06-30-07, 04:28 PM   #5
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I have flat feet and when I was running cross country many years ago, I had a pair of orthotics made by the Podiatrist. Years later my bike fitter said I needed to put the orthotics in the SIDI Genius 5 shoes.

The main reason was to get the right muscles working on the down stroke. Somehow with flat feet, the muscles aren't being used to its full potential. I don't know if all this is true but I have them in the shoe. I honestly cannot tell one way or another. To me, the feet still flatten out on the down stroke.
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Old 06-30-07, 04:53 PM   #6
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I have flat feet, and have been using prescription orthotics for years in my street shoes, but in my athletic equipment: hockey skates, ski boots, and cycling shoes (also Sidi Genius, though the 4s), I use grey Superfeet. They rock. http://www.superfeet.com/



Jorpe, from our ride a couple weeks ago (I know, I still owe you pics), the only thing I really noticed was your stroke wasn't in circles, and on the steeper pitches when you geared way down it was (IMHO) working against you; you seemed to be bouncing around too much trying to spin up the hill. I think you can try a gear or two harder, and focus on pedaling in a circle. On your commute, try it by pedaling with one foot. You'll notice right away that the bike surges with each downstroke. Try to even it out so there isn't any surging. Thirty seconds at a time with each leg is a good place to start, and work up from there (say, once a week)....
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Old 06-30-07, 08:01 PM   #7
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Quote:
Originally Posted by cynergy
jorpe,

where did you get your prescription from? i'm flat footed and would like to get some good insoles. i switched over to biking because my knees started to hurt from running. i used some off-the shelf insole, but I tend to get some hot spots/blisters from them.
I've tried many over the counter off the shelf insoles from Dr. Schols but they did not work. I would get hot spots and arch problems. Most of them didn't work because they were too soft and you need a harder plastic to keep the arch up! I know this sounds hard to understand but I found the only over the counter product that worked was the Walk Fit Orthotics. I usually stay away from products that say "As seen on TV" becuase they are junk. However, this product is the REAL DEAL! I was about to invest in $500.00 dollars in perscription orthotics because my big toe started to hurt from walking! That was then!

I tried the WalkFit orthotics and found they were much harder then any over the counter product. At first, I was worried because my left foot was in bad shape and it could feel the pressure. After a while, I got used to them and the hot spots are gone! I still feel my feet are healing and getting better with time. My big toe no longer hurts when I walk and I'm thinking of changing the support insert from high to medium. I'm surprised this product works and it only cost $20.00 dollars

http://www.walkfit.com/
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Old 07-01-07, 05:40 AM   #8
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Buy a durable pair of orthotics and they last a life time. You can also buy cheaper sneakers from then on. They actually make Wal*Mart knockoff Converse Chucks comfortable (I buy a size larger than I need).
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Old 07-01-07, 03:10 PM   #9
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Okay, I got my orthotics when I went through rehab for a reconstructed ACL 9 years ago now.

A couple other things were holding me back. I changed those today:

1. My seat was too far back.

2. Only having one water bottle cage made it hurt my back to have a couple gatorade bottles in my jersey pockets.

3. I finally stepped up and went all lycra and polyester today. I wont go back!


Some notes:

I think Turin lays goatheads outside of their doors so you have to buy a tube every time you go in there.

A Castelli "Large" Jersey is NOT the same as a large jersey from some stateside company.

Wash Park is a hot spot for beautiful single women.

I'm ridiculously good looking.
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Old 07-01-07, 03:12 PM   #10
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Garfield Cat
I have flat feet and when I was running cross country many years ago, I had a pair of orthotics made by the Podiatrist. Years later my bike fitter said I needed to put the orthotics in the SIDI Genius 5 shoes.

The main reason was to get the right muscles working on the down stroke. Somehow with flat feet, the muscles aren't being used to its full potential. I don't know if all this is true but I have them in the shoe. I honestly cannot tell one way or another. To me, the feet still flatten out on the down stroke.
I can tell a huge difference in the power of each stroke. I cant believe I didnt think of doing this earlier.
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Old 07-01-07, 03:17 PM   #11
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Quote:
Originally Posted by superdex
I have flat feet, and have been using prescription orthotics for years in my street shoes, but in my athletic equipment: hockey skates, ski boots, and cycling shoes (also Sidi Genius, though the 4s), I use grey Superfeet. They rock. http://www.superfeet.com/


Jorpe, from our ride a couple weeks ago (I know, I still owe you pics), the only thing I really noticed was your stroke wasn't in circles, and on the steeper pitches when you geared way down it was (IMHO) working against you; you seemed to be bouncing around too much trying to spin up the hill. I think you can try a gear or two harder, and focus on pedaling in a circle. On your commute, try it by pedaling with one foot. You'll notice right away that the bike surges with each downstroke. Try to even it out so there isn't any surging. Thirty seconds at a time with each leg is a good place to start, and work up from there (say, once a week)....
I thought you had just figured out I switched your Ultegra for my 105 and you were holding the pictures hostage until I returned the components.

Seriously though, thank you for that advice. I think just putting the insoles in my shoes made me pedal more correctly. I concentrated on making sure I was firing my legs up on the upstroke, not doing it passively. My averages on the same trail went up almost 3mph just in the last 2 rides. I also took my bike back to Bicycle Village and when they did whatever tuneup they did it became much easier to switch between rings so I wasn't missing strokes going uphill
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Old 07-29-07, 03:43 PM   #12
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Quote:
Originally Posted by markhr View Post
it's great even for those of us without the need for prescription orthotics - I use the sidas conformable ones and no more hotspots, sore feet and numb toes - and they cost less than 1/10 of prescription ones

http://www.sidas.com/index.adml?id=3...12&r=437&l=111

Apologies for resurrecting a dead thread, but I have a question:

Do you conform these insoles yourself, or do you have them done at (apparently, judging from the dealer list) a ski boot place?

What was the cost?
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Old 07-29-07, 04:57 PM   #13
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Originally Posted by nycphotography View Post
Apologies for resurrecting a dead thread, but I have a question:

Do you conform these insoles yourself, or do you have them done at (apparently, judging from the dealer list) a ski boot place?

What was the cost?
at a ski boot shop and for insole, moulding and fitting it was GBP45 or 55 - not sure which, sorry.

They're most definitely worth it and so much cheaper than going to a foot specialist.

edit - sorry, I actually got it done at a bike shop but it's the only bike shop I know of with the moulding kit - almost every ski shop has the same kit though.
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Last edited by markhr; 07-29-07 at 05:02 PM.
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Old 07-29-07, 05:04 PM   #14
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these guy's are rumored to be the best in London at doing the fitting

http://www.profeet.co.uk/f_footwearsuppliers.asp
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Old 07-29-07, 05:09 PM   #15
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looks like there's a dealer in Joisey

http://www.thesozegroup.com/dealer/index.php

ALMOS ALPINE SKI SHOP
3206 FIRE ROAD
EGG HARBOR TWS NEW JERSEY USA Phone (609) 641-1211
Fax (609) 383-0581
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Old 07-29-07, 05:09 PM   #16
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Your custom orthotic more than likely has a perfectly placed metatarsal arch pad. The metatarsal arch is what contacts the pedal if your foot is correctly placed. This is why you like it so much. bk
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Old 08-22-07, 10:53 AM   #17
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You might want to try these as well. http://www2.yoursole.com/home
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