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  1. #1
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    Help: salvage old TREK 720, or keep new TREK 7100?

    Your wisdom is welcome.

    New hybrid/comfort biking addict here: just gotta have my 30 minutes to 2 hours a day in the saddle. Turned 58 last Thursday, and promptly plunked down $325 for a new TREK 7100. My aging bones were drawn to its spiffy newness and to the front fork shock absorber. But it has a clunky shifter and a nothing-special ride.

    I miss the road-hugging feel of the old TREK 720. It needs new wheels (according to Rusty Spokes & his orchestra) and a plastic brake caliper thing-a-ma-jig.

    New bike cost $325, old bike will cost $200 to upgrade.

    I'm financially challenged, but for once my limited funds are not the only issue.

    Is there enough of a qualitative difference between the two bikes to warrant spending the additional $100+ on the newbie?

    Thank you for your input.

  2. #2
    59'er Mariner Fan's Avatar
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    Your old Trek 720 is worth a lot of money these days. Have you checked out what they are going for on E-Bay?

  3. #3
    biked well well biked's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by RichardTrek
    Your wisdom is welcome.

    New hybrid/comfort biking addict here: just gotta have my 30 minutes to 2 hours a day in the saddle. Turned 58 last Thursday, and promptly plunked down $325 for a new TREK 7100. My aging bones were drawn to its spiffy newness and to the front fork shock absorber. But it has a clunky shifter and a nothing-special ride.

    I miss the road-hugging feel of the old TREK 720. It needs new wheels (according to Rusty Spokes & his orchestra) and a plastic brake caliper thing-a-ma-jig.

    New bike cost $325, old bike will cost $200 to upgrade.

    I'm financially challenged, but for once my limited funds are not the only issue.

    Is there enough of a qualitative difference between the two bikes to warrant spending the additional $100+ on the newbie?

    Thank you for your input.

    There are two very distinct Trek 720's that I know of. One is the classic 720 touring bike from the early-mid '80's, sometimes even called "the best touring bike ever built." Super long chainstays, Reynolds 531 tubing, all the touring-specific bells and whistles, etc., etc. The other 720 is a "hybrid" bike from the '90's. If yours is the 720 tourer, my opinion is that you should do whatever you gotta do to keep it on the road-
    Last edited by well biked; 07-08-07 at 11:25 PM.

  4. #4
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    it's the other one

    Quote Originally Posted by well biked
    There are two very distinct Trek 720's that I know of. One is the classic 720 touring bike from the early-mid '80's, sometimes even called "the best touring bike ever built." Super long chainstays, Reynolds 531 tubing, all the touring-specific bells and whistles, etc., etc. The other 720 is a "hybrid" bike from the '90's. If yours is the 720 tourer, my opinion is that you should do whatever you gotta do to keep it on the road-
    Thank you for sharing.

    The one in my garage is the hybrid 720. According to the Trek website, based on its glacial blue color with black decals, it's likely a 1992, right where you placed it.

    "Touring" to me suggests dangerously skinny tires, ram's-horn handlebars and a painful fall. But as these city excursions feel more and more confining due to all the traffic, I might just bust out into the touring orbit. That leads me back to a logical resolution to my original dilemma: keep the hybrid 720 rolling and save up for a decent touring bike.

    And as to the latter: what would you suggest for this entry-level touring tyro?

  5. #5
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    Go Mariners!

    Thanks for your swift reply.

    I looked in vain on EBay for a 720, but I still believe you. Perhaps you were thinking of what Well Biked referred to as the classic TREK 720, which was a touring bike; mine is the more humble hybrid.

    Now I guess I'll keep the hybrid as the round-the-city "rusty nail," and save up for a decent entry-level touring bike.

    Any suggestions?

    PS: Let's hope your boys overtake the dreaded Angels, from whom the Yankees finally took a series....

  6. #6
    Senior Member Bill Kapaun's Avatar
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    Is the $200 spent having the LBS fix it, or fixing it yourself?
    If the former, you could probably do a lot of stuff yourself using Sheldon Browns & the Park Tools websites.
    I picked up a 91 TREK 820 a few months back for $15 on CL. The shifters were messed up, but it had good, usable wheels. FH rear and QR's. I was able to flush the front shifter out with WD-40 and get it working and threw on a cheap friction shifter for the rear from a xmart junker. I now have a back up bike that actually fits me quite well.
    Point is, you don't always need NEW parts.

  7. #7
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    fixin' & savin'

    This is a forum-idable group of folks--you all are a great resource!

    The $200 is for the purchase of 2 new wheels, which LA shops have quoted as either $50 or $65, plus the missing plastic "part" that broke off one of the brake calipers, plus their labor.

    Of course, Helen's disagrees with Palms Cyclery when the latter says I need "2700 cassette" (which I term I presume describes the rear wheel assembly only?). Both shops have indicated that they charge more to replace the rear wheel, and that makes it sound even more like something I couldn't do myself. All I know is the 720 is stamped with the numbers 19" and 48cm. How is wheel size determined?

    The front wheel--with its QR lever that resembles the seat post clamp--looks like something even this dummy could undo and replace--but I don't trust myself to remove and replace the tires. Of course, I haven't yet had a flat tire to repair, but that'll be a traumatic day: I feel like the Woody Allen or the Larry David of bicycle owners. I guess it's time to sit down with Sheldon Brown and get greasy.

  8. #8
    The Site Administrator: Currently at home recovering from a couple of strokes,please contact my assistnt admins for forum issues Tom Stormcrowe's Avatar
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    Bicycle repair is actually pretty easy. Just read Sheldon, or the Park Tool site. There are some specialized tools you'll eventually need, which will MORE than pay for themselves, generally in the first repair job.

    Until then, though, just start with small jobs, like tire changes and go from there.
    on light duty due to illness; please contact my assistants for forum issues. They are Siu Blue Wind, or CbadRider or the other 3 star folk. I am currently at home recovering from a couple of strokes. I am making good progress, happily.


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  9. #9
    59'er Mariner Fan's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by RichardTrek
    Thank you for sharing.

    The one in my garage is the hybrid 720. According to the Trek website, based on its glacial blue color with black decals, it's likely a 1992, right where you placed it.

    "Touring" to me suggests dangerously skinny tires, ram's-horn handlebars and a painful fall. But as these city excursions feel more and more confining due to all the traffic, I might just bust out into the touring orbit. That leads me back to a logical resolution to my original dilemma: keep the hybrid 720 rolling and save up for a decent touring bike.

    And as to the latter: what would you suggest for this entry-level touring tyro?
    Ah, I was referring to the Mid 80's touring bike.

  10. #10
    Urban Biker jimmuter's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Tom Stormcrowe
    Bicycle repair is actually pretty easy. Just read Sheldon, or the Park Tool site. There are some specialized tools you'll eventually need, which will MORE than pay for themselves, generally in the first repair job.

    Until then, though, just start with small jobs, like tire changes and go from there.
    I agree. I have the same hybrid Trek 720 that you speak of and I did major repairs on it myself last year. I'm not very handy, but I replaced the bottom bracket, cranks, and entire drive train including both dérailleurs. Even after buying the necessary tools and taking it to the LBS to get the rear dérailleur working correctly (I had the chain too short), I still saved over $100 from what they quoted me to fix it. My one BIG caution is that repairing it takes time and that's time that you aren't riding it. That nearly drove me mad last year.

    I have a much newer Specialized Tricross now, but still ride the 720 a whole lot. It's sort of like wearing a comfy old sweatshirt instead of the new fancy leather jacket. There are occasions suitable for both.

  11. #11
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    Treks 2 to tango

    Thank you all.

    I ended up buying the TREK FX 3, which to me is really a road bike with hybrid-width tires and without the drop handlebars. It rides like a dream.

    And I'm keeping the 720. As you suggest, it's good to have a comfortable old bike around when you don't want to go formal.

    Great forum!

  12. #12
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    4 words: TREK 720! Bike Station!

    I was convinced to repair my Trek 720 after learning that buying a comparable NEW bike would be upwards of $800. I took it to the Bike Station where they helped me do some of the work (advice is free), sold me parts for nearly cost, and charged only $5 to replace tubes and tires. I, too, had been told I'd needed a new cassette for >$100, but this guy said I just needed a new bottom bracket (the axle core) for ~$30, installed.

  13. #13
    Great State of Varmint Panthers007's Avatar
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    schmin - as you are a newbie here, might I offer a nugget of advice? Before addressing a thread you found, on a subject that interests you, it's always good to check the date on the thread.

    If it's truly needed - go ahead. Or start your own thread.

    Happy Trails!
    How do you keep an idiot in suspense?

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