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  1. #1
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    Mountain Bike vs. "Fitness"/Hybrid Bike

    sorry for all the recent (similar) threads but I want to make sure i get the right bike for me before I make a purchase.... & it'll probably be made fairly soon.

    I'm basically using the bike for exercise/fitness, recreation, quick errands & possibly light trails (nothing too major though - dirt paths at the most). My budget is basically $450 or less (no more) & I just want a quality bike that'll serve the purpose I want it to.

    So... w/ that said, which sounds better for me personally?

    Mountain Bike (probably a Hardrock Sport in Large & sell my current HR, which is too big) or Fitness/Hybrid Bike (trek 7.2 fx - which is the bike i've been posting about the most lately).



    vs.




    i appreciate any responses....

  2. #2
    Mad bike riding scientist cyccommute's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by MTBnOH
    sorry for all the recent (similar) threads but I want to make sure i get the right bike for me before I make a purchase.... & it'll probably be made fairly soon.

    I'm basically using the bike for exercise/fitness, recreation, quick errands & possibly light trails (nothing too major though - dirt paths at the most). My budget is basically $450 or less (no more) & I just want a quality bike that'll serve the purpose I want it to.

    So... w/ that said, which sounds better for me personally?

    Mountain Bike (probably a Hardrock Sport in Large & sell my current HR, which is too big) or Fitness/Hybrid Bike (trek 7.2 fx - which is the bike i've been posting about the most lately).


    i appreciate any responses....
    It really depends on what you want to do in the future rather than what you want to ride right now. As you get more experience in riding, you'll naturally want to push the difficulty to a higher level. If you want to do more mountain biking, the Hardrock will serve you better than the Fx. However, if you want to go faster on the road the Fx will be better than the Hardrock.

    Personally, I would would lean towards the mountain bike if I could only have one bicycle. It's more versatile than the Fx in that it will handle more difficult trails better than the Fx. The front shock on a bike does more than just cushion the ride. It provides much better control than a rigid fork does (I've ridden both...shocks are better.) It is slow on the road but not so much slower as to be worth losing the off-road capability.
    Stuart Black
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  3. #3
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    what makes the Fx series a "Fitness" bike? at least, what makes it more of a fitness bike over a mountain bike?

  4. #4
    Banned. Mr. Beanz's Avatar
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    I would go for the FX bike but only cause I like the way it looks!

    But I had a $250 Trek 800 with 1.5 high psi tires. When I was training hard, I could keep up with some of the high end roadies on the trail. So either one can be used as a fitness bike and can get some serious speed depending on your training. I think the fitness comes from your style, not the bike!

  5. #5
    Mad bike riding scientist cyccommute's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by MTBnOH
    what makes the Fx series a "Fitness" bike? at least, what makes it more of a fitness bike over a mountain bike?
    A 'fitness' bike is basically a skinny tired mountain bike or a road bike with flat bars. The Fx is more of a road bike then a mountain bike. Comfort bikes tend more towards the mountain bike side...at least the bikes look like mountain bikes but they really aren't. They are light duty mountain bikes only. The Fx would do nicely for rail trails but not much rougher than that. It wouldn't be horrible for commuting. If the frame were a little longer, it'd make an okay touring bike.

    I'd probably still choose a mountain bike over one of the fitness bikes if I wanted to ride trails and a road bike over the fitness bike if I wanted to ride on the road.
    Stuart Black
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  6. #6
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    The $400 to $500 range is the "sweet spot" for both fitness bikes and mountain bikes. Lots of very well made, durable models to chose from.

    The mountain bikes will have front suspension and 26 inch tires, which is an advantage for "rough" off-road riding. And, with light weight slicks, a mountain bike is plenty fast for five or ten mile trips across town.

    A fitness bike can be found with 700c tires and with a "hard" fork. With 28mm or 32mm slicks, a fitness bike will be a tad faster on pavement than a mountain bike with slicks. The "hard" fork eliminates repair issues a few years from now, but is not as much fun on rough trails.

    So, if you will be riding 90% on pavement, the "fitness" bike is the best way to go. If you are riding 90% on dirt, the mountain bike is the way to go. If its 50% of each, flip a coin, or buy the red bike.

  7. #7
    Walmart bike rider gpsblake's Avatar
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    Since your not going to be riding in the Tour De France or going to be a contestant in the X-Games....

    Get a bicycle you feel comfortable riding. It's the most important thing for what you are going to use it for.

    If the bike isn't comfortable, you won't ride for long.

    If you are going through an LBS, then take both types of bike for a test ride.

    Then take it from there

  8. #8
    Senior Member mustang1's Avatar
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    Get a HardRock. The nobbly tires will make it a better fitness bike, forcing you to ride harder for the same distance you ould apply for a hybrid bike with slimmer tires.

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by alanbikehouston
    The $400 to $500 range is the "sweet spot" for both fitness bikes and mountain bikes. Lots of very well made, durable models to chose from.

    The mountain bikes will have front suspension and 26 inch tires, which is an advantage for "rough" off-road riding. And, with light weight slicks, a mountain bike is plenty fast for five or ten mile trips across town.

    A fitness bike can be found with 700c tires and with a "hard" fork. With 28mm or 32mm slicks, a fitness bike will be a tad faster on pavement than a mountain bike with slicks. The "hard" fork eliminates repair issues a few years from now, but is not as much fun on rough trails.

    So, if you will be riding 90% on pavement, the "fitness" bike is the best way to go. If you are riding 90% on dirt, the mountain bike is the way to go. If its 50% of each, flip a coin, or buy the red bike.
    thanks, this is kinda what i was thinking.
    i will mainly be doing bike paths & mainly for fitness.

  10. #10
    Non Tribuo Anus Rodentum and off to the next adventure (RIP) Stacey's Avatar
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    Get yourself a big piece of paper. Draw a large 'T' on the paper. Above the horizontal arm state your needs, wants, desires in a bicycle. Down one side list the atributes of the Hardrock that align with your need at the top of the page. Down the other side do the same thing for the Trek. Below that make another cross line and list the attributes of each that don't align with your needs. The answer will become self-evident.

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