Advertise on Bikeforums.net



User Tag List

Results 1 to 11 of 11
  1. #1
    Senior Member calves2997's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Location
    Los Angeles, Ca
    My Bikes
    Litespeed Archon, Ultimate, Palmares, Blade. BMC Pro Machine. Trek 7.3 FX Commuter
    Posts
    106
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Upgrading to carbon fork

    I just bought a Trek 7.3 FX trail bike and am looking to upgrade the front fork to carbon.
    The trek website lists the steerer diameter as 1 1/8 diameter and length of 335 mm.
    I see several forks advertised with the same diameter but slightly greater length. Will this still fit? I will let my LBS install it for me. What about offset? Is this the same as rake? I think probably not but the offset on the advertisements is often missing. Is this important?
    Any information is appreciated.

  2. #2
    PatronSaintOfDiscBrakes dynaryder's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Location
    dropped and lost in Washington DC
    Posts
    6,222
    Mentioned
    11 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    The rake is pretty much determined by the headtube,not the fork. Well,unless you're going from a curved fork to a straight blade. The steerer tube length listed for the forks is uncut. They're always long so they can fit a variety of bikes. The shop will cut it down to the proper size.

    C'dale BBU('05 and '09)/Super Six/Hooligan8and 3,Kona Dew Deluxe,Novara Buzz/Safari,Surly Big Dummy,Marin Pt Reyes,Giant Defy 1,Schwinn DBX SuperSport/Qualifier,Dahon Speed Pro TT,Brompton S6L

  3. #3
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Location
    Middle of the road, NJ
    Posts
    2,201
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    What fork do you have in mind?
    I have a 7.5 FX, and am thinking of the same upgrade.

  4. #4
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    May 2005
    Posts
    7,283
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    I don't consider changing from cromoly to carbon an "upgrade." I've heard of and seen many shattered carbon forks. I've never heard of or seen a shattered cromoly fork.

    A shattered fork can cause a fatal accident (there's at least one thread here in bikeforums about a fatal accident when the carbon forks shattered), and if it doesn't you're almost certainly going to do a face plant, with accompanying severe injuries. If it was me, I would keep the cromoly fork.

    That's my opinion. Of course, other people may have their own opinions.

  5. #5
    Erectible Member pedalMonger's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    Enroute
    Posts
    515
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by leob1 View Post
    What fork do you have in mind?
    I have a 7.5 FX, and am thinking of the same upgrade.
    7.5 FX has a carbon fork already. At least the 2007 models, did older models not have a carbon fork?
    Milky Is The Way
    -----
    [SIGPIC][/SIGPIC] : http://www.gravel2008.us : Democracy.mp3

  6. #6
    Erectible Member pedalMonger's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    Enroute
    Posts
    515
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by Blue Order View Post
    I don't consider changing from cromoly to carbon an "upgrade." I've heard of and seen many shattered carbon forks. I've never heard of or seen a shattered cromoly fork.

    A shattered fork can cause a fatal accident (there's at least one thread here in bikeforums about a fatal accident when the carbon forks shattered), and if it doesn't you're almost certainly going to do a face plant, with accompanying severe injuries. If it was me, I would keep the cromoly fork.

    That's my opinion. Of course, other people may have their own opinions.

    That's scary. How common is this? And does the likelihood of it happening depend on what brand and/or build of carbon fork? I'm not too concerned about it happening unless I dump the bike in an accident and it develops an undetectable structural weakness as a result.
    Milky Is The Way
    -----
    [SIGPIC][/SIGPIC] : http://www.gravel2008.us : Democracy.mp3

  7. #7
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    May 2005
    Posts
    7,283
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by pedalMonger View Post
    That's scary. How common is this?
    I don't know how often, but I do know it happens. I just heard about another one just this week.

    And that thread about the cyclist who died is somewhere here in bikeforums. In his case, he had been in a minor crash the week before, and it created stress fractures in his forks. He didn't inspect his forks for stress fractures after the crash, which you should always do. He was on a steep, fast descent when his forks shattered, and he went over the bars and did a full face plant at speed. DOA.

    Quote Originally Posted by pedalMonger View Post
    And does the likelihood of it happening depend on what brand and/or build of carbon fork?
    I'm not sure.

    Quote Originally Posted by pedalMonger View Post
    I'm not too concerned about it happening unless I dump the bike in an accident and it develops an undetectable structural weakness as a result.
    That's when you need to have it thoroughly checked out.

  8. #8
    Senior Member calves2997's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Location
    Los Angeles, Ca
    My Bikes
    Litespeed Archon, Ultimate, Palmares, Blade. BMC Pro Machine. Trek 7.3 FX Commuter
    Posts
    106
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    I was thinking about a

    Kinesis Crosslight EVO Carbon Cyclocross Fork
    which has a 1 1/8 steerer tube, and is full carbon so it only weighs 485 gms. It also has the required brake mounts and since it is for a cyclocross bike must be hefty enough for road use. And it has the vibration dampening features of carbon.
    What do you guys think? It my be overkill on this bike, since it costs almost as much as the bike did.

  9. #9
    Time for a change. stapfam's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Location
    6 miles inland from the coast of Sussex, in the South East of England
    My Bikes
    Dale MT2000. Bianchi FS920 Kona Explosif. Giant TCR C. Boreas Ignis. Pinarello Fp Uno.
    Posts
    19,915
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by calves2997 View Post
    I was thinking about a

    Kinesis Crosslight EVO Carbon Cyclocross Fork
    which has a 1 1/8 steerer tube, and is full carbon so it only weighs 485 gms. It also has the required brake mounts and since it is for a cyclocross bike must be hefty enough for road use. And it has the vibration dampening features of carbon.
    What do you guys think? It my be overkill on this bike, since it costs almost as much as the bike did.
    Definitely overkill.

    Chromoly forks come in all types and Flexes. One of the Best steel forks around is the Kona- Project II. Not ultra expensive and This is one fork that comes in a variety of thicknesses for Flexability and Different brake mount systems for disc or V brakes. Pretty light too- but if you want real upgrade- Then hunt out a dealer for these and save LOT OF MONEY.


    As to C.F, Forks breaking- This is rare and many of the Stock C.F. forks are overmade. They night aswell be solid C.F.- will not be light- Will not be Flexible and will not break. Might aswell stay with Steel.
    How long was I in the army? Five foot seven.


    Spike Milligan

  10. #10
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2004
    Posts
    5,251
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Switching would NOT be an "upgrade". The fork that came with your bike was designed to provide optimal fit, handling, and ride qualities. If you bought the carbon fork that Trek uses for your same frame on different models, it would be a "side grade"...good handling, but less protection against damage.

    Carbon forks originally became popular on racing bikes, because of a modest weight savings. Then, marketing "guru's" figured out that folks who will NEVER race assume that if something is on a racing bike, it is a "superior" product, and worth a higher price. So, they began putting carbon forks on bikes that are NOT race bikes, degrading the usefulness of the bike, but providing an excuse for raising the price.

    Today, because carbon forks are on virtually all road bikes selling for more than $600 or so, cheapo carbon forks are made in "cookie cutter" fashion in Asian factories. At the wholesale level, many of them are really cheap ($20 or $30), a reflection of their "quality".

    The best material for a bike fork is steel. Steel bends under mild stress, and then returns to its normal position. Under severe stress, steel will bend even more, but it can later be realigned. When a carbon fork is stressed beyond its limits, it does not bend...it simply snaps like a pretzel.

  11. #11
    Senior Member brianmcg123's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2002
    Location
    TN
    Posts
    456
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    As others have said, save your money, a carbon fork is definitely not an upgrade.
    Everyone's a roadie, they just might not know it yet.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •