Advertise on Bikeforums.net



User Tag List

Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 25 of 40

Thread: Pray for me

  1. #1
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Posts
    158
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Pray for me

    One of these days, I will hopefully succeed in removing my bike's platform pedals which are seemingly STUCK ON WITH CONCRETE; then I can install some with toe clips and also try out PowerGrips and get on with my cycling.

    Yes I know you bend the wrench down towards the back. Believe me, I have read everything there is to read about pedal removal. I have tried one pedal wrench, pretty useless, and have put in an order for a bigger pedal wrench.

    Tried:
    * tapping the crankarms
    * using WD-40, though how you really are supposed to get it IN THERE, is a bit of a mystery.
    * pouring boiling water over it
    * heating for 10 mins with a candle held 1/2 inch away.
    * pushing yet harder on the pedal wrench. I think they were originally put on with CRAZY GLUE. I practically have broken my wrists trying to get any semblance of something turning.

    Next project is to heat for 20 or so mins with the candle, and try the big-ass pedal wrench when it arrives.

  2. #2
    Gorntastic! v1k1ng1001's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    United States of Mexico
    Posts
    3,428
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Why not try a new crankset?

  3. #3
    institutionalized PDXJeff's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Location
    Portland, OR
    My Bikes
    Two old Schwinns, Kona Cinder Cone, Redline MonoCog, Custom (U.B.I.) Columbus Cyclocross/commuter.
    Posts
    243
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by v1k1ng1001 View Post
    Why not try a new crankset?
    ...or maybe a good bike shop. Any quality shop will give it a shot, especially if your going to buy some new pedals.

  4. #4
    biked well well biked's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Posts
    6,712
    Mentioned
    1 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by Sportsman9 View Post
    One of these days, I will hopefully succeed in removing my bike's platform pedals which are seemingly STUCK ON WITH CONCRETE; then I can install some with toe clips and also try out PowerGrips and get on with my cycling.

    Yes I know you bend the wrench down towards the back. Believe me, I have read everything there is to read about pedal removal. I have tried one pedal wrench, pretty useless, and have put in an order for a bigger pedal wrench.

    Tried:
    * tapping the crankarms
    * using WD-40, though how you really are supposed to get it IN THERE, is a bit of a mystery.
    * pouring boiling water over it
    * heating for 10 mins with a candle held 1/2 inch away.
    * pushing yet harder on the pedal wrench. I think they were originally put on with CRAZY GLUE. I practically have broken my wrists trying to get any semblance of something turning.

    Next project is to heat for 20 or so mins with the candle, and try the big-ass pedal wrench when it arrives.

    Carefully placed hammer blows to the end of the wrench. Or a cheater bar (I usually use a piece of pipe) over the end of the wrench for more leverage. But the hammer blows tend to work best, there's nothing like impact. Hit it hard, but just don't miss.
    Last edited by well biked; 10-26-07 at 07:45 AM.

  5. #5
    cab horn
    Join Date
    Jun 2004
    Location
    Toronto
    My Bikes
    1987 Bianchi Campione
    Posts
    28,298
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Didn't even try carnkaarms in a vice with breaker bar on the pedal wrench...?
    Mes compaingnons cui j'amoie et cui j'aim,... Me di, chanson.

  6. #6
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Posts
    14,276
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Take it to a good LBS. I tried pretty much everything I could manage to remove a set of stuck pedals for a few days.
    Took it to a local bike shop and 20 min later they were unstuck. It cost all of $10.
    If I had know that at the start I would have taken it there in the first place instead of wasting 2 days.

  7. #7
    cab horn
    Join Date
    Jun 2004
    Location
    Toronto
    My Bikes
    1987 Bianchi Campione
    Posts
    28,298
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by DataJunkie View Post
    Take it to a good LBS. I tried pretty much everything I could manage to remove a set of stuck pedals for a few days.
    Took it to a local bike shop and 20 min later they were unstuck. It cost all of $10.
    If I had know that at the start I would have taken it there in the first place instead of wasting 2 days.
    You should've asked them what they did, then the experience would've been worth 2 days. A bike shop isn't some magical place that fixes bikes they do what you and I can do. Sometimes you just don't have the tools to do it.
    Mes compaingnons cui j'amoie et cui j'aim,... Me di, chanson.

  8. #8
    Senior Member wahoonc's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    On the road-USA
    My Bikes
    Giant Excursion, Raleigh Sports, Raleigh R.S.W. Compact, Motobecane? and about 20 more! OMG
    Posts
    15,854
    Mentioned
    1 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    I don't think a candle is going to provide enough heat over a large enough area. You need careful and judicious application of a torch followed by a solid pedal wrench with big ass cheater pipe and possible a few hammer blows.

    Aaron
    Last edited by wahoonc; 10-26-07 at 09:49 AM.
    Webshots is bailing out, if you find any of my posts with corrupt picture files and want to see them corrected please let me know. :(

    ISO: A late 1980's Giant Iguana MTB frameset (or complete bike) 23" Red with yellow graphics.

    "Cycling should be a way of life, not a hobby.
    RIDE, YOU FOOL, RIDE!"
    _Nicodemus

    "Steel: nearly a thousand years of metallurgical development
    Aluminum: barely a hundred
    Which one would you rather have under your butt at 30mph?"
    _krazygluon

  9. #9
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Posts
    14,276
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by operator View Post
    You should've asked them what they did, then the experience would've been worth 2 days. A bike shop isn't some magical place that fixes bikes they do what you and I can do. Sometimes you just don't have the tools to do it.
    Really?
    Jumping to conclusions as usual?

    They used a frame bender tool as leverage. I was watching them as it was done.

  10. #10
    Dances a jig. Mchaz's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Location
    Central, Ok
    My Bikes
    2007 Surly Long Haul Trucker 54cm (Commuting/Wanna' go tour so bad), 1985 Trek 670 21" (Road), 2003 Gary Fisher Tassajara 17" (MTB), Cannondale DeltaV 600 (commuterized MTB), some junker bikes in my garage
    Posts
    403
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Try some Liquid Wrench. It is a penetrating oil made for de-sticking threads. It comes in a spray can like WD-40. Really soak the pedal spindle on both sides of the crank arm. Repeat applications, and allow it to sit overnight. Then use the big friggin' pedal wrench and a cheater bar if necessary. A towel around the handle can be useful for spreading out the pressure on your hands. Jumps or bursts of torque can help get the threads to budge initially.

    Be double sure you are turning the wrench the right way. Counter-clockwise on the drive side, clockwise on the non-drive side (assuming your chainrings are on the right). I have got them backwards before, thinking I was correct the whole time. Doh.

  11. #11
    Senior Member Retro Grouch's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Location
    St Peters, Missouri
    My Bikes
    Rans Enduro Sport, Hase Kettweisel Tandem, Merin Bear Valley beater bike
    Posts
    23,100
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by Mchaz View Post
    Try some Liquid Wrench. It is a penetrating oil made for de-sticking threads. It comes in a spray can like WD-40. Really soak the pedal spindle on both sides of the crank arm. Repeat applications, and allow it to sit overnight. Then use the big friggin' pedal wrench and a cheater bar if necessary. A towel around the handle can be useful for spreading out the pressure on your hands. Jumps or bursts of torque can help get the threads to budge initially.

    Be double sure you are turning the wrench the right way. Counter-clockwise on the drive side, clockwise on the non-drive side (assuming your chainrings are on the right). I have got them backwards before, thinking I was correct the whole time. Doh.
    I agree with Mchaz. People tend to recommend WD40 for everything but it doesn't do this kind of job nearly as well as Liquid Wrench.

    One other thing. Whenever you are using a lot of torque this close to your chainring, take the time to shift your chain onto your biggest chainring first. That way, when the pedal finally breaks loose, you'll need fewer stitches.

  12. #12
    Hey guyz? Guyz? Wait up!! Siu Blue Wind's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Posts
    10,476
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Try to position the pedal to the front of the bike and the wrench position to the back of the bike but more pointing at 2:00 (or 10:00 depending upon which side) Using an extension such as a pipe on the handle of the wrench, hold the pedal with one hand and the extension/wrench with the other. Using your weight, push down on the pedal, and with more pressure to the extension/wrench. It helps if you stand sorta sideways to your bike, facing the wrench.

    And I usually put a rag over the chainring just in case I slip.
    Quote Originally Posted by Buddha
    We are what we think. All that we are arises with our thoughts. With our thoughts, we make the world.
    Quote Originally Posted by making View Post
    Please dont outsmart the censor. That is a very expensive censor and every time one of you guys outsmart it it makes someone at the home office feel bad. We dont wanna do that. So dont cleverly disguise bad words.

  13. #13
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Posts
    158
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Original Poster here: the LBS is my last resort. I'm just a little more stubborn than my pedals. If I go to the shop, I have to explain why I bought my pedals over the internet.

    Will have to hunt down some Liquid Wrench, thanks for the tip.

    To everyone who suggests attaching a pipe: what is the best pipe material, and how do you attach it tightly to the wrench? My new wrench will be the "pro" Park Tools.

  14. #14
    Senior Member wahoonc's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    On the road-USA
    My Bikes
    Giant Excursion, Raleigh Sports, Raleigh R.S.W. Compact, Motobecane? and about 20 more! OMG
    Posts
    15,854
    Mentioned
    1 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by Sportsman9 View Post
    Original Poster here: the LBS is my last resort. I'm just a little more stubborn than my pedals. If I go to the shop, I have to explain why I bought my pedals over the internet.

    Will have to hunt down some Liquid Wrench, thanks for the tip.

    To everyone who suggests attaching a pipe: what is the best pipe material, and how do you attach it tightly to the wrench? My new wrench will be the "pro" Park Tools.
    I use thick wall galvanized pipe that I have scraps laying around on the farm. A piece of fence post pipe might work too. I would avoid any really thin wall stuff. Also FWIW I use PB Blaster rather than Liquid Wrench YMMV.

    Aaron
    Webshots is bailing out, if you find any of my posts with corrupt picture files and want to see them corrected please let me know. :(

    ISO: A late 1980's Giant Iguana MTB frameset (or complete bike) 23" Red with yellow graphics.

    "Cycling should be a way of life, not a hobby.
    RIDE, YOU FOOL, RIDE!"
    _Nicodemus

    "Steel: nearly a thousand years of metallurgical development
    Aluminum: barely a hundred
    Which one would you rather have under your butt at 30mph?"
    _krazygluon

  15. #15
    cab horn
    Join Date
    Jun 2004
    Location
    Toronto
    My Bikes
    1987 Bianchi Campione
    Posts
    28,298
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by DataJunkie View Post
    Really?
    Jumping to conclusions as usual?

    They used a frame bender tool as leverage. I was watching them as it was done.
    When you fail to provide information in your posts people draw their own conclusions. You want to be a jackass? I can be one too. And i'm better at it than you are. The point of my post was to learn from an experience rather than saying F it. You had to nitpick your post into an argument and be a asshat at the same time.

    The tool they used is not a "frame bender" it's a fork and frame straightener. It also has a secondary use of allowing you to grip almost any handled tool available in the shop for great leverage.

    Quote Originally Posted by Sportsman9 View Post
    Original Poster here: the LBS is my last resort. I'm just a little more stubborn than my pedals. If I go to the shop, I have to explain why I bought my pedals over the internet.
    No decent bike shop will give a ****. A mechanical job is a mechanical job.
    Last edited by operator; 10-27-07 at 07:11 AM.
    Mes compaingnons cui j'amoie et cui j'aim,... Me di, chanson.

  16. #16
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Posts
    14,276
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    lol
    Congratulations, you have proven my point once again.

  17. #17
    jcm
    jcm is offline
    Gemutlichkeit
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Posts
    2,424
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by Sportsman9 View Post
    Original Poster here: the LBS is my last resort. I'm just a little more stubborn than my pedals. If I go to the shop, I have to explain why I bought my pedals over the internet.

    Will have to hunt down some Liquid Wrench, thanks for the tip.

    To everyone who suggests attaching a pipe: what is the best pipe material, and how do you attach it tightly to the wrench? My new wrench will be the "pro" Park Tools.
    It doesn't have to attach tightly to the wrench, just has to be large enough to slide over it. Then, brace the crank arm if you can, so it doesn't rotate the crank when you whack the pipe. A dead-blow hammer works best. Those have a load of lead shot BB's inside to give them increased energy at the point of impact. In other words, no bounce. Few stuck items can resist a dead-blow. Cheap ones are commonly available at any ToolTown, and you should have one in any case. A small one will work, having a head about 1" in dia.

    In fact, a dead-blow might even break it loose without the pipe.

    CAVEAT: with the use of any impact, you should be sure that the wrench fits snugly, or you may round off the flats on the pedal axis. This complicates things.

  18. #18
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Location
    South Florida
    Posts
    726
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Not trying to be a wise *****, but is it possible, just possible that you are applying pressure in the wrong direction? Perhaps tightening instead of loosening? How can a pedal be so damn tight that you need such leverage and force to back it off?

  19. #19
    Senior Member wahoonc's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    On the road-USA
    My Bikes
    Giant Excursion, Raleigh Sports, Raleigh R.S.W. Compact, Motobecane? and about 20 more! OMG
    Posts
    15,854
    Mentioned
    1 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by bobn View Post
    Not trying to be a wise *****, but is it possible, just possible that you are applying pressure in the wrong direction? Perhaps tightening instead of loosening? How can a pedal be so damn tight that you need such leverage and force to back it off?
    Dunno,
    But I have one pedal off of a British 3 speed where the crank arm actually broke across the threads and left the lower part of the crank arm still attached to the pedal. Needless to say we had to scrounge up a replacement crank arm. Fortunately it was the non drive side.

    Aaron
    Webshots is bailing out, if you find any of my posts with corrupt picture files and want to see them corrected please let me know. :(

    ISO: A late 1980's Giant Iguana MTB frameset (or complete bike) 23" Red with yellow graphics.

    "Cycling should be a way of life, not a hobby.
    RIDE, YOU FOOL, RIDE!"
    _Nicodemus

    "Steel: nearly a thousand years of metallurgical development
    Aluminum: barely a hundred
    Which one would you rather have under your butt at 30mph?"
    _krazygluon

  20. #20
    Cycle Year Round CB HI's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Location
    Honolulu, HI
    Posts
    11,102
    Mentioned
    1 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Use some good grease with the new peddles, so you don't have to go through the problem again.

  21. #21
    M_S
    M_S is offline
    All Mod Cons M_S's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    Face down in a snowbank
    My Bikes
    K2 Enemey Cyclocross franken build; Redline D660 29er, Volpe SS Cross
    Posts
    3,694
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    If the pedal isn't greased that's usually where there are issues. Take it to a bike shop, if nothing else they yend to have the best tools.

  22. #22
    Been Around Awhile I-Like-To-Bike's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2004
    Location
    Burlington Iowa
    My Bikes
    Vaterland and Ragazzi
    Posts
    18,936
    Mentioned
    5 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by Sportsman9 View Post
    If I go to the shop, I have to explain why I bought my pedals over the internet.
    Why? Just pay the LBS for taking off the old pedals. Period. Presumably you can screw the new ones on yourself. Don't forget to put a little grease on the new pedal threads so you don't repeat this problem.

  23. #23
    institutionalized PDXJeff's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Location
    Portland, OR
    My Bikes
    Two old Schwinns, Kona Cinder Cone, Redline MonoCog, Custom (U.B.I.) Columbus Cyclocross/commuter.
    Posts
    243
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by operator View Post
    No decent bike shop will give a ****.
    Then they are are not a decent shop. Maybe your LBS experiences are just a reflection of your own attitude.

  24. #24
    Been Around Awhile I-Like-To-Bike's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2004
    Location
    Burlington Iowa
    My Bikes
    Vaterland and Ragazzi
    Posts
    18,936
    Mentioned
    5 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by PDXJeff View Post
    Then they are are not a decent shop. Maybe your LBS experiences are just a reflection of your own attitude.
    Do you mean "decent shops" interrogate their customer's about the source of their bicycle accessories and parts? No thanks, I'll stick to places that answer my questions about their services or goods for sale.

  25. #25
    jcm
    jcm is offline
    Gemutlichkeit
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Posts
    2,424
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Chances are good that most shops will pop 'em off as you stand there, it's that simple with all the tools-n-tricks they have. A couple of them around here wouldn't even charge for it, no matter where you bought the stuff. I've stopped in at a local for a quick adjustment during a ride, they do it, and I leave a gratuity to help with the pizza.

Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •