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  1. #1
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    3mo old onguard ulock won't open

    I have http://www.onguardlock.com/lockviewe...ock&model=5006 this onguard ulock. I've used it for about 3 months. I usually leave it on bike rack overnight. Today it wouldn't open! The key won't go in all the way. I'm not sure what the deal is. I didn't see anything inside of it that someone might of used to open it (for what there was nothing locking it?) but who knows. The ulock has a case that slides over the hole that keeps the inside protected. I think someone might have tried to pry it open too over night because I don't see how it got a few of the gouges that it did just hanging on off a rack so it's possible someone broke a pick in it.

    Is there anyway to rescue my lock?

  2. #2
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    Sounds like the plates are out of alignment.

    Here's a description on how to correct it from an old thread:
    By alanbikehouston
    You don't need a locksmith. You simply need to understand the new flat key mechanism used by BOTH OnGuard and Kryptonite on their 2005 model U-locks. The keyway where you insert the key has rotating plates. If someone tries to pick the lock, the plates rotate and make picking more difficult.

    However, if you are inserting the key, and begin to turn the key before the key has passed the bottom plate, the plates rotate, and the lock refuses to open. You can also turn the plates by turning the key slightly as you withdraw the key from the keyway.

    Both OnGuard and Kryptonite place a red warning sticker on their 2005 locks, warning owners to insert the key fully before beginning to turn the key. However, until you "play around" with the lock a bit, you won't understand how to prevent accidently plate rotation, or how to cure it.

    If all of the plates are aligned correctly, when you look into the keyway you will see a rectangular open box with smooth sides that extends to the bottom of the crossbar. If a plate has rotated out of place, you will see a jagged edge along one side of the keyway.

    The solution sounds complicated, but takes just five or ten seconds after you have practiced. You take the tip of the key and gently rotate the top plate so it is perfectly aligned with the second plate. Then you stick the key a bit deeper, and rotate the second plate so that it is perfectly aligned with the third plate. Then do the fourth plate, and the fifth plate. When all of the plates are aligned, the key turns very easily. If the key resists turning, or you must use force to turn the key: STOP...the key is NOT at the bottom of the keyway, and you will break the key.

    When I got my first "flat key" locks, I accidently jammed them a couple of times. After I discover HOW I was jamming them, and realigned the plates, I've never had the slightest problem. Just work the key ALL the way to the bottom and turn the key lightly and the lock pops open.

  3. #3
    Senior Member zonatandem's Avatar
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    Superglue?

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by ceridwen View Post
    Sounds like the plates are out of alignment.

    Here's a description on how to correct it from an old thread:
    Thanks probably the issue. I will try that later!

  5. #5
    Hip to the Game. bcart1991's Avatar
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    Fire + drill = win

    though not unless you want to use the lock again...
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  6. #6
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    Point is to rescue my lock. No point in wasting time to break it since it's not locking anything now. Just messed up a bit...

  7. #7
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    The rotating "anti-pick" plates get out of alignment if you turn the key while taking the key out, or turn the key while inserting it.

    Just use the tip of your key to realign the first plate with the second plate, and the second plate with the third plate, until you reach the bottom of the key way. Then turn the key, and the lock opens.

    The rotating plates seemed very loose on 2005 model flat-key locks. The flat-key locks currently reaching bike shops use the exact same design, but the rotation plates don't rotate easily. The only way to get them out of alignment is to insert the key and begin turning the key before the tip of the key hits the bottom of the key way.

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    I spent about 15 mins in the sun messing with it and still can't get it to open. It won't go in the last 2-3mm not sure if it's the plates that are out of alignment =/

    Maybe I should get a Kryptonite I guess.

  9. #9
    BEEP BEEP IMMA JEEP darksmaster923's Avatar
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    buy a hand grenade and see it go boom boom
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  10. #10
    Senior Member Sci-Fi's Avatar
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    If you have a problem with onguard now you will have the same problem with kryptonite when the plates go out of alignment.

  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sci-Fi View Post
    If you have a problem with onguard now you will have the same problem with kryptonite when the plates go out of alignment.
    I tried ABH's method and it still won't go in the last 2-3mm to open so I don't think it's the plates I mentioned in my earlier post. Thanks though

  12. #12
    Senior Member Ziemas's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by crydee View Post
    I tried ABH's method and it still won't go in the last 2-3mm to open so I don't think it's the plates I mentioned in my earlier post. Thanks though
    This is a known problem with OnGuard locks. Try hitting the lock with something heavy like a hammer as you are inserting the key. I've had this happen with THREE OnGuard locks, yet never with a Kryptonite or Abus.....The OnGuard lock should have a lifetime guarantee, call for a new lock.




    Quote Originally Posted by OnGuard Website
    We have found that despite our efforts to make the best locks in the industry, a small number of lock owners, particularly in beachside areas and areas where salt is used to condition icy roads, encounter trouble with our lock mechanism. Corrosion and dryness of the lock cylinder sometimes cause the locking mechanim to bind 90-degrees into the rotation of the key.

    There are several steps lock owners can take to prevent this. First, most of our locks come with a plastic cover to keep dirt and debris out of the locking mechanism. Keeping the cover closed at all times will greatly increase the reliable durability of the locking mechanism. Second, the locks are designed to drain water that enters the lock. As such, the water that goes through the lock can actually wash away the manufactuer's lubrication. If you feel your lock getting dry (it becomes harder and noisy to turn the key), use some light oil or lubricant to reduce friction between moving parts in the locking mechanism.

    Finally, in situation where the lock does bind and users cannot get the lock open, we have discovered a technique that may help in getting the lock open to allow for further maintenance. Although we do not recommend that users rely on the following method, we have found a way to unlock most locks that are binding as a result of the above-described problem. The procedure is as follows:
    1) insert the key in fully into the cylinder
    2) turn it 90-degrees, right before the point where the key would normally start binding.
    3) with the key in this position, sharply tap the lock with a firm object (we've used another lock, a small hammer, or similar object) along the length of the crossbar.
    4) as you are tapping the lock, continue turning the key.

    We should note that this method has not worked on all locks, but it has been helpful in getting users out of binds. We should also note that you should NOT FORCE THE KEY. Excessive force used to turn the key may result in bending or breaking the key or damaging the locking cylinder.

    We offer the above advice and maintenace recommendations so that our consumers will have a resource to turn to when wondering how they should take care of their locks and troubleshoot them in case of an emergency. However, consumers experiencing persistent problems with the lock should contact us directly via phone (800-213-4561) or through a support ticket.
    http://www.todson.com/support/index....=viewent&id=44

  13. #13
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    Thanks Ziemas, for posting OnGuard's "hammer" instructions.

    I'm trying to figure out why the "hammer" method works. I'm thinking that if the "hammer" method works, it is because the two lowest rotating plates have gotten stuck to each other or to the sides of the keyway due to salt or corrosion.

    So, tapping on the key with a hammer might free those plates, but they would still need to be realigned with the keyway.

    To prevent corrosion in locks, use the lubricant supplied by locksmith shops on a regular basis, especially if you live or ride near salt water. WD-40 is useful for locks that are already suffering from corrosion.

    So, if simply realigning the plates with the tip of the key does not work, I would first use some WD-40 and give it an hour to soak in. Then attempt to realign the plates again, and then use the "hammer" method as a last resort.

    I have several flat-key OnGuard locks, and they are used in Houston, Texas where the air is a mixture of salt breezes from the Gulf of Mexico and toxic chemicals from spewing from plants operated by BP, Shell, Mobil and other corporate criminals who thrive in a state whose politicians are for sale "cheap".

    With the worst quality of air in the USA, I've never had an OnGuard lock "freeze" up or refuse to open. My Kryptonite New York locks are heavily corroded on the tips of the cross-bars, but oiling the key mechanism and bolts has kept them working well. I suspect regular oiling may prevent must "freeze-up" problems.

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