Bike fit.

I started this thread to hear what everyone’s experience has been with getting a professional fitting. I’m sharing a recent fitting I went through and welcome everyone’s comments or questions. I have invited Kevin Wilson to join as a member since there are questions that I may not since I was the individual that was receiving the benefit of Kevin’s expertise. Kevin is explained a little further into this thread.

I’ve always taken the view that the most important part of a new bike or frame is the fit. Brand model or manufacture mean little if it’s the wrong size. Even with a correct sized bicycle your performance and comfort can be comprised if your position is not dialed in perfectly between the bike and your body. Sometimes just a simply saddle height or fore or aft adjustment, stem length change or adjustment can have you pedaling with greater efficiency. With the size of the expense of putting together a bike why not get the most out of what you have?

So I went through a bike fitting to dial in my Lynskey this past weekend with Kevin Wilson from Wilson Bicycle Consultants (www.LightWeightBikes.net) Kevin works with a combination of Fit Kit, Wobble Naught, very soon Dartfish and mixes in with some kinesiology knowledge. Kevin did admit that not everything with the human body will fit into a neat little formula. A prime example might be that almost everything would point to me riding 175mm cranks but I have found going back and forth from 172.5 to 175mm cranks that 172.5’s just give me much better power and better spin. I do really prefer to spin.

You might ask how I came to choose Kevin as a fitter? It was simple. I asked Lance Johnson from Temple Bikes/ Groupe de Tete, and a fellow Weight Weenie member, who he considered the best fitter out there. The recommendation from Lance was Kevin. It appears that Kevin work with Lance on several of Lance’s high profiled builds. Kevin has also worked with a few others on the website too.

Kevin and I met early on Saturday morning and from there the various measurements on my body started first. This followed with maps of both my feet. Then my bike was checked against Lynskey’s “claimed frame specifications. The frame was very close to what Lynskey specified and Kevin did comment that Lynskey did a very good job with their frames and their degree of accuracy was very high. This is not always so even on some very high end frames. All other signicant components where also checked against manufactures claimeed specifications.

The next step of this process was Kevin feeding all these measurments into a computer program that would calculate what needed to be done to dial my bike in to yeld the best fit solution for me. With the solution in hand and thanks to some lasers, levels and other measuring devices we were off to the next step.

The first thing that Kevin did was to properly adjust my cleats to the correct position on my shoes. I had them pretty close but they were off some. Next was to work on bike. A quick check of the saddle height found I was off by 1mm. Damn am I good. Then a fore and after check showed I was 20mm too far back. Well I guess not that good. Although leading up to the fitting I mentioned to Kevin that I thought I was too far back but my thoughts were a centimeter and not two. Then a quick measurement told us my stem was 1 centimeter too long. This one fooled me since I really thought I would need to go longer.

Now it was time to connect the dots or get on the bike. My perception of the fitting is based mostly on riding my rollers and one 50-mile training ride. (Winter in the Midwest sucks!) Its kind of hard to argue with a long history of training data so here is the benefit that I noticed. I have to assume that my new position on the bike has created greater efficiency because since the fitting my cadence is higher by about 2% as an average and my heart rate has dropped. My spin also feels smoother. This transitioned over to my one ride I did get on the road.

Well now you’ve heard my fitting story so lets here your experiences!