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  1. #1
    Aquatics Master AquariaGuy's Avatar
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    Question about pedals.

    Well there's a bike show in 2 weeks, and i'm deciding to get pedals / shoes. In shoes, what am i looking for apart from comfort? I have tried on 2 shoes, LG and Answer, and the LG had a soft bottom sorta like a hiking shoe, and the Answer had a TOUGH bottom. Whats the difference? Harder shoes more energy efficient? (Btw, my price range is about/around $150 CDN.)

    Also, for pedals, what is a good brand and how do the cleats work. I hear this SPD thing, and it's by shimano, but is that the cleat or pedal type? I'm looking for something easy to clip in/out and doesn't require a lot of maintenance...like something that clogs a lot with dust/mud. Do pedals like, LOOK, Ritchey use SPD too? How would i know what shoe is compatible with what pedal? (Sorta lost on this issue)

    Last thing, is it easy to assemble pedals on the bike? Since i will be buying it at a bike show, i will have to put them on myself, or bring them to a shop. Though doing it myself would be nicer, since i would learn something.

    Thanks for the help guys!

    Matt
    My bike:
    Giant Yukon

    Wickedly lickety shot,
    Spickety spickety split lickety! :D

  2. #2
    Senior Member Stubacca's Avatar
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    I assume since your bike is a Giant Yukon that we're talking mountain bike pedals here....

    Shoes: hard sole will be more energy efficient, and I find them much more comfortable for longer rides. If you're doing a lot of walking around in the shoes, you may find the sneaker-style soft-sole shoes to be a better option. Comfort is the big thing, IMHO. They need to be firm fitting, but not tight. If you'll be doing a lot of winter riding, you'll need to be able to accomodate warmer socks (or perhaps get a second pair of slightly larger shoes).

    Pedals: There are three big MTB pedal systems out there.
    * SPD (Shimano and many copies) - cheapest system out there, but big weakness is poor mud shedding on the low end models
    * Egg Beater (Crank Brothers) - great mud shedding and easy release system
    * Time ATAC - also great mud shedding, has lateral float which some people find riders find annoying.

    I hated SPD pedals off-road. I found the mechanism very 'sticky', even in dry conditions. I've never tried Time pedals, though most who try them like them, but have been very happy with the Egg Beaters. Check out some of the pedal reviews on www.mtbr.com to get an idea of what riders think of them.

    Assembly: Easy. Normally you just need an open ended 15mm spanner/wrench and/or an 8mm allen key. Often the stock pedals will be hard to remove if they weren't greased properly before installation, requiring a liberal application of elbow grease to make them budge. Grease the threads before you install the pedals to make sure they're easy to take off again later on (if you ever need to change them). Cleats are very easy to install in the shoes. The pedals should come with instructions for installation - if not, you can normally download the guide from the manufacturers website.

  3. #3
    Aquatics Master AquariaGuy's Avatar
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    hey thanks for the reply...so far i've narrowed it down to a pair of shoes that i have to go back home to try...but i found the pedals M-324 in the town here where i go to school...for $80 i think. Those have the clips and the platform on the other side. Has anyone tried these, or any experiences/stories about these? that'd be great if i could hear some reviews..i've read the ones on mtbr.com btw. so for shoes..i'm aiming for lake or sidi.

    one question, i saw these Specialized Team for $65 CDN and its 2 years old. So it's basically half price now. Is that a good deal for 2 yr old shoes? New btw. Thanks

    Matt
    My bike:
    Giant Yukon

    Wickedly lickety shot,
    Spickety spickety split lickety! :D

  4. #4
    Senior Member bhchdh's Avatar
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    I've used the 324's for the best part of a year now. I've put in over 1600 miles on my 520 with them, including one ride of 115 miles. I like being able to click in for some rides and just hop on and go for others without worrying about putting on my bike shoes. I've also been using the Lake SPD sandles for casual rides, I've found them quite comfortable in the summer.

  5. #5
    Passing!
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    Quote Originally Posted by AquariaGuy
    hey thanks for the reply...so far i've narrowed it down to a pair of shoes that i have to go back home to try...but i found the pedals M-324 in the town here where i go to school...for $80 i think.
    Matt
    Since I had always used clips and straps that had come on my bikes, I figured I'd try these pedals and see if I liked being locked in, for the money the pedals are an excellent value. I put them on both my bikes and have combined just over 1000 miles on them. I love the fact I don't have to click in especially at stop signs and lights. I can leave one foot clicked in push through the intersection on the cage on the other foot, and click in when I'm out of the intersection without loosing any get up and go. I have Cannondale "sneaker" style shoes with a lot of tread so it took some getting used to clicking in but nothing major. They have just enough float to keep my knees and ankles happy, and a very secure hold until I twist to release. I have been on them in weather down to about 34 so far and they haven't frozen up, but it was dry, so I am waiting to pass complete judgement until there is some rain/sleet/snow/freezing. Even than I can just ride on the cage side and not worry too much in a pinch! I will add that I haven't tried any other style so I am sure there are others who will know of better. If I recall correctly though I only paid about $65.00 at the LBS so you might want to shop around!

  6. #6
    Aquatics Master AquariaGuy's Avatar
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    Oh no, $80 CDN. Alright, so hopefully i'll find a cheap pair at the bike show. bhchdh and ohio trekker: have u guys used it in the mud yet? because you guys didn't say what kind of riding you did, so i assumed commuting since u've gotten a lot of mileage on them. are they easy to flip over to clip-on? like if u're reading without touching the pedals, which side will be up? i am thinking that the heavy side would point down...so the cage will be down? i just hope it's fairly easy to get used too, and it's good in the semi long run (2 yrs) before i decide to buy another one.
    My bike:
    Giant Yukon

    Wickedly lickety shot,
    Spickety spickety split lickety! :D

  7. #7
    Passing!
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    Quote Originally Posted by AquariaGuy
    Oh no, $80 CDN. Alright, so hopefully i'll find a cheap pair at the bike show. bhchdh and ohio trekker: have u guys used it in the mud yet? because you guys didn't say what kind of riding you did, so i assumed commuting since u've gotten a lot of mileage on them. are they easy to flip over to clip-on? like if u're reading without touching the pedals, which side will be up? i am thinking that the heavy side would point down...so the cage will be down? i just hope it's fairly easy to get used too, and it's good in the semi long run (2 yrs) before i decide to buy another one.
    Can't say I've been in the mud, but one of the trails I ride the most is paved with crushed gravel which get's pretty nasty when it get's wet. I know they have help up to this stuff pretty well and it's really more like a cement or plaster type mixture when it gets wet. I ride the trail even in the rain so suspect they will hold up pretty well to mud. If they get too gunked up shoot them with your water bottle!! Didn't pay attention to your CDN so your probably right in the ball-park. I usually hose stuff off after a ride and dab them with a little grease to keep them clicking happy. I would have expected them to flip with the cage down, clip up, but have not found that they land either side up on a consistent basis so they seem to be pretty well balanced. I clip in right side before I take off, and flip the left if I need to once I am moving. After reading all the folks with their clipless falls, I (knock on wood) count myself lucky not to be in the fallen group. It is weird when you come to a stop since for whatever reason I always end up leaning toward the side that's clipped in and have nearly fallen a couple times at a stand still. Have learned to pay attention and purposely lean the other way, and consistently leave my right foot clipped in for the duration even when stopping. GOOD LUCK on your quest. I have no doubt they will hold up for a year or two, just flush them and grease them when they get too nasty!

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