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Leo1903 03-22-08 07:02 PM

Bike Computer
 
Hello,

I've just purchased a 07 Specialized Tricross Sport. It will be more of a general purpose, commuter/tourer/soft offroad bike for me and was considering getting a computer mounted.

What I'm looking for is a simple computer that could be mounted out of the way, on the front fork - ideally on a bike pannier mount. I imagine that because of the shear proximity to the spoke magnet (or whatever), the gaget could be wireless? I'd like to avoid frequent battery changes, so would I be better off going with a wired instrument?

Really, I all care about is that the device has an odometer and possibly a speedometer, so hopefully it could be made very compact.

Also is there a bike computer that does not completely loose it recorded stats. when the battery evently dies? I'd like the instrument to be able continue recording from where it left off.

Thanks very much,

Leo

StephenH 03-22-08 07:23 PM

I've got one of the $10 Schwinn things. It works fine for me, but it DOES lose stats when battery goes dead or is changed (including odometer and tire size settings). And it only took 6 months or so for the battery to go out. To get a replacement, I had to go to Radio Shack, it's an odd size.

I bought one of the wireless models by accident, but discovered the receiving unit was too bulky to fit between the spokes and the fork on my bike (a balloon-tire cruiser, not your normal road bike).

JanMM 03-22-08 08:07 PM

Wired or wireless, the transmitter/sending unit goes on the fork, close to the spokes but not on the inside of the fork, generally. Battery life is longer on wired units. Just try finding a cyclometer that doesn't display your speed, Leo 1903. Report back if you find one that is just an odometer.

twobikes 03-22-08 08:19 PM

I have a Schwinn speedometer from Wal-Mart. It is wired and sells for less than $10. It works flawlessly. The battery is still working after nearly two years. It is small and mounts to the handlebars, but there is quite a bit of flexibility in how you mount it because of a sort of knee joint piece. It gives speed and distance information; but also maximum speed, trip time, clock, and average speed. You can download a manual for it by searching for one from the company that made it, namely Ascent.

Roody 03-22-08 08:54 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by twobikes (Post 6387068)
It gives speed and distance information; but also maximum speed, trip time, clock, and average speed.

Yes. I reccommend getting these features, as they only cost a dollar or two more than a model with just odo and speedo. Computers are so small, cheap, and light that I don't see much reason not to have one. I think display readability is the main thing to shop for. I'd like to find one I can read at night.

Leo1903 03-27-08 10:10 PM

Thanks all for your responses.

Just thought that I'd mention the brand of the computer I ended up buying, since it might interest some who were looking for similar features to what I desired. Although it was still a compromise, it will suit my purpose quite well I think.

It's the smallest and thinnest overall that I've seen and mounts quite indiscreetly on my handlebars stem. It also has a programmable odometer. So although it will loose all stored data when the battery eventually dies, the odometer reading can be programmed to back into the unit, so that one can continue on from were one left off.

http://www.cateye.com/en/product_detail/279

JeffB502 03-28-08 01:20 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Roody (Post 6387249)
Yes. I reccommend getting these features, as they only cost a dollar or two more than a model with just odo and speedo. Computers are so small, cheap, and light that I don't see much reason not to have one. I think display readability is the main thing to shop for. I'd like to find one I can read at night.

A large portion of my riding is at night (usually my commute to work is in the afternoon and my ride home is at night). I've found a light mounted on my helmet is great for reading my computer's display. I use a Fenix P3D Premium 100 on my helmet, but even when I used my Mag Lite 2xAA with the Nite Ize LED drop in on my helmet (3 5mm LEDs) that was enough to see the computer. I use a Cateye Enduro 8 computer.

As an added bonus, a dim helmet light is good as a "be seen" light and a brighter helmet light is great for being seen and also seeing around corners when you're turning. With a helmet light I've found simply looking at drivers that are about to pull out in front of me works very well for getting their attention.

I guess if you don't wear a helmet there are other ways to strap a small flashlight to your head :).

Cadfael 03-28-08 09:18 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Leo1903 (Post 6418765)
Thanks all for your responses.

Just thought that I'd mention the brand of the computer I ended up buying, since it might interest some who were looking for similar features to what I desired. Although it was still a compromise, it will suit my purpose quite well I think.

It's the smallest and thinnest overall that I've seen and mounts quite indiscreetly on my handlebars stem. It also has a programmable odometer. So although it will loose all stored data when the battery eventually dies, the odometer reading can be programmed to back into the unit, so that one can continue on from were one left off.

http://www.cateye.com/en/product_detail/279

I have a Cateye by default (a HR-CC100), it was attached to a bike I inherited from my father in law. The thing is, this bike been hanging unused for 10 years, and the computer battery is still working. Okay, it was not in use, but the clock was still working and only a few mins out and some power must have been drawn from the battery just for that.


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