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  1. #26
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    Don't sweat it--I couldn't balance a bike until I was ten, but then again rode my first century and first double century four years later! What helped me learn to balance was riding a friend's bike that was truly too small for me. It was 20" wheels, mine had 24" wheels, bought so that I would "grow into it." To me, that green mf'n Stelber fit like a crucifix. My buddy's Sting Ray let me feel closer to the ground, I feared falling less, I was more daring in trying to balance, before I knew it, my own bike was rideable.

  2. #27
    Who farted? Ka_Jun's Avatar
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    http://www.stridersports.com/

    Try the trick w/ the removing the pedals. I picked up a Strider for our two year old but right now he prefers the tricycle. Have patience, your kids will get there.

  3. #28
    Senior Member deraltekluge's Avatar
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    The real trick is to always remember that this is all for the kid's fun and enjoyment. It's not for your benefit...don't let your ego get involved.

  4. #29
    Who farted? Ka_Jun's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by deraltekluge View Post
    The real trick is to always remember that this is all for the kid's fun and enjoyment. It's not for your benefit...don't let your ego get involved.

    Too true. God forbid the OP's kid doesn't like to ride, but hey, gotta factor in that possibility. If the kid is vibing negativity and disappointment from ole dad, riding most definitely won't = fun.

  5. #30
    YAT-YAS devildogmech's Avatar
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    No, he wants to ride.... He SAYS he can ride just fine.... put him on the bike and he freaks out....

    I took the pedals off and tried to have him barny ruble it, but he wouldnt, said he would look like a geek

    I was going to get him a razor scooter this weekend, but we are supposed to get 2" of snow tonight!

    Billy
    Master Guns Crittle, You out there??
    "A human being should be able to change a diaper, plan an invasion, butcher a hog, conn a ship, design a building, write a sonnet, balance accounts, build a wall, set a bone, comfort the dying, take orders, give orders, cooperate, act alone, solve equations, analyze a new problem, pitch manure, program a computer, cook a tasty meal, fight efficiently and die gallantly. Specialization is for insects." -Robert A. Heinlein

  6. #31
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    No, he wants to ride.... He SAYS he can ride just fine.... put him on the bike and he freaks out....
    FWIW, with my youngest son we tried for so long but, as you say, as soon as I was about to let go he'd freak out. We took some time off ... a couple weeks went by and he regained his interest by watching his older brother bomb around and eventually wanted to try again. But the second time I wanted him to feel more in control, so I lowered his seat so he could put his feet flat on the ground. During his pedal stroke his legs were little tight. Knowing that he could simply put his feet back down completely gave him alot of confidence and he picked it up quite quickly. Once he "got it" I slowly raised the seat to a better height.

    ... From what I've learned, confidence and a sense of control are far more helpful to a kid trying to learn to ride than finding that perfect fit and riding position - kids are resilient when they're comfortable and confident.

  7. #32
    Senior Member Indyv8a's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by kerk View Post
    Having taught my 3 kids, I found that one of them needed a very different approach. The first two were very receptive to the techniques listed above. They were concerned about riding, doing it right and making me proud. The last one didn't want that. He just wanted to spend time with me. After tried and true methods didn't work, I came to the realization that I had the wrong goal with him. Here is my advise..... Make sure your mind is on you and your son, not anywhere else. Don't be concerned about getting done so you can get somewhere. Make the goal to have fun today, not become an accomplished rider today. If the two of you go out and have fun, he will make more progress on the bike more quickly. This one will remember the time you spend together learning how to ride for the rest of his life. How do you want him to remember it? Do some stupid stuff that we did as kids. How far will this bike go with no one on it before it falls with a good push? You don't get this time back. Don't blow it.
    You sir, are a genius. This is so true, and exactly how I didn't handle it. Perhaps you could instruct me on arriving at your level of zen.
    Slow, but at least still moving...

  8. #33
    Nerd girljen's Avatar
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    I'm not a dad. I'm a first-time mom of an infant, who's still a little young to ride. But I was a kid at one point. My mom and my twin brother (who still rides circles around me, btw) tried everything to 'help' me learn how to ride, and only ended up annoying me! I did what you're describing your son doing.

    Finally, one day, I decided that I was sick of them bothering me. While they were inside, I went outside and took my bike to the top of the gentle slope in the back yard. I walked the bike up, got on, and coasted down. I didn't try to pedal at first, I just wanted to keep my balance. After a few runs of that, I pedaled and never looked back!

    Some kids just need to figure it out on their own.

  9. #34
    srp
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    This is one of my favorite topics. First, get excited and tell him that when he learns to ride a bike, it will be a skill that is unforgettable and will be with him for the rest of his life.

    Then, get him in helmet, knee and elbow pads and gloves. Go into a street or parking lot and hold the back of the seat. Just walk along supporting the bike. Don't run. The name of the game is balance and not speed and momentum. ( I learned that lesson the hard way)

    Remind him to not look at the tire but to look about 20-30 feet ahead of him. Let him mosey along getting his sense of balance. Slowly let go but still walk along. Soon, he won't need you holding on.

    Next, as he starts figuring it out, come up with a bribe. Promise him something cool when he can start, ride and stop without falling. Then go in the house and let him work it out. Might take a few hours but he'll do it. My first dayghter did this and within a few hours, we went for a five mile ride.

    After a week or so, ditch the pads and have fun.

    I've used this method with all four of my kids and it works well.

    Have fun.

  10. #35
    srp
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    I forgot to mention why I recommend the street or a parking lot.

    Grass is safety. It's real easy to aim for the grass and fall over. If there's no grass, they have to stay upright.

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