Advertise on Bikeforums.net



User Tag List

Results 1 to 14 of 14
  1. #1
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2002
    Location
    Fort Collins, CO
    My Bikes
    Jamis Quest, Santa Cruz Blu, Miyata Seven Ten (early eighties)
    Posts
    109
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    What is randoneuring?

    I've seen this term a few times recently - here and elsewhere. Can somebody tell me what randoneuring is? Thanks.

  2. #2
    60mph in the 42 ring! Dave Stohler's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2003
    Location
    Niagara Frontier, NY
    Posts
    546
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Radoneurring is ultra long-distance racing, where you are usually given X number of hours to complete a course, often 1000 miles or longer. There are often 'stopover' locations where you can get a few hours sleep before continuing. Of course, this is part of the time you use....
    Often, radonneurs ride 2-300 miles in a day. The bikes used are similar to touring bikes (many events require fenders to be fitted), but are quite light. Only a small rack bag is usually carried, with a small amount of cargo aboard-multi-tool, 2 tubes, foldup raingear, and not much else. Lighting is essential to radonneuring, and many use Schmidt dynohubs.
    This is really more of a European event. The Paris-Brest-Paris race is a type of radonneur event, although I believe they don't carry lights, fenders, or supplies onboard for that event. Night sections are done by motor-pacing behind a car.
    Cycling Addict
    **************
    (techinical questions gladly answered via AIM)

  3. #3
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2001
    Location
    England
    Posts
    12,395
    Mentioned
    3 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    You get randonee events, which are also called Audax in the UK.
    In France there are pre-set randonee courses , with suggested times. You can pick up proof of riding by stamping your card at various hostelries along the way.
    The bikes favoured for these events are touring bikes, but far more race-oriented than a loaded, expedition tourer. They are often made of race materials, with clearance for 25mm tyres + fenders, and a road triple gearing system.
    For the insane, there are 12, 24hr and longer events.

  4. #4
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2003
    Posts
    70
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Hmm . . . i have "randoneurr" style handlebars on my bike . . . they are quite comfortable . . . I see why, now.

  5. #5
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2003
    Posts
    136
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    The US organization has a web site at www.rusa.org.

    Another part of it is a series of time-limited rides overa several week span. The rides are usually 200km (125 miles), 300km (190 mi), 400km (250 mi), and 600km (390 mi). A person who completes a series of these rides is called a "super randonneur" and qualifies to do one of the 1200 km rides. The original and most famous is Paris-Brest-Paris, but there are several in the US and Canada, including Boston-Motreal-Boston, one out of Davis, California, and several others.

    I've been planning to give it a try this year. The first 200km ride is in late March. The 400km ride is considered by many to be the hardest in the 200/300/400/600 series because the time limit of 24 hours or so minimizes the sleep options.

  6. #6
    opinionated SOB cycletourist's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2000
    Location
    Branson, Missouri USA
    Posts
    968
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by Dave Stohler
    Radoneurring is ultra long-distance racing,
    I am a member of RUSA (Randonneurs USA). According to RUSA, Randonneuring is NOT racing. It is touring and it works like this:

    The events are 200, 300, 400, 600 and 1200 kilometers. You ride on open roads and must obey all traffic laws. Lights are REQUIRED when riding in non-daylight hours. You must do your own repairs. You may accepts parts, tools and help from other ride participants but you may NOT accept outside help- that is grounds for disqualification.

    The events are timed, however the pace is pretty relaxed. I average 15 mph (13 mph including stops) and easily finish within the time limit. There are checkpoints along the way to insure that no one cheats by taking shortcuts. You must get your card stamped at each checkpoint (except for unmanned checkpoints where you must write down some piece of information about the checkpoint).

    Everyone who finishes gets a medal and finishing times are listed in ALPHABETICAL order to discourage racing.
    Last edited by cycletourist; 11-15-03 at 06:58 PM.

  7. #7
    Senior Member Avalanche325's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2003
    Location
    Pasadena, CA
    My Bikes
    Litespeed Firenze / GT Avalanche
    Posts
    3,162
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    200, 300, 400, 600 and 1200 kilometers
    I can see why everyone gets a medal - well deserved.

  8. #8
    60mph in the 42 ring! Dave Stohler's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2003
    Location
    Niagara Frontier, NY
    Posts
    546
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    What Cyclotourist is referring to is one form of radonneuring, a common one here in the US, but there are other forms which most definately are competitive. The difference between them is similar to the difference in types of automobile rallying. Most Americans would think of a Sunday afternoon fun-run, sponsored by a local car club. Europeans, OTOH, know them more as all-out racing events. I used to compete in the latter and occasionally help organize the former-the difference between them is considerable, yet they go by the same general term.

    I'd doubt that anybody competing in the Paris-Brest would consider it to not be a competitive event...
    Cycling Addict
    **************
    (techinical questions gladly answered via AIM)

  9. #9
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2001
    Location
    England
    Posts
    12,395
    Mentioned
    3 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    They are non-competative in the sense that it is illegal to hold competative races on roads in the UK, so they are just rides. Your Honour.

  10. #10
    Breaker of Spokes P. B. Walker's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    N. Virginia
    Posts
    493
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    I believe there is also a "team" type event that is around 200 or 300 km. Basically, you have 3 or more teammates and you all have to do the ride together and finish together, or within a certain time of each other. I forget the exact name of it, but I want to say it's called a fleche, or something like that. It's one of the events that qualifies when you are going for the super rand medal.

    One thing that wasn't mentioned (I don't think) is that you are responsible for the navigation yourself. You are given a map and a cue sheet, and it's up to you to follow it. I've heard some pretty horrible stories about people getting off course and having to backtrack big time. It's not a marked route from what I understand.

    Also that big ride in France (Paris-Brest-Paris) you have to qualify for in order to ride it. It's only held every two years.

  11. #11
    Ready to go anywhere Csson's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2001
    Location
    .se
    Posts
    313
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    I would think that most cyclists calling themselves randonneurs refer to the original kind of randonneuring as it was originally designed by Audax Club Parisien (the kind organized by Rusa and other organizations around the world). Personally, I don't think it's fair to call, for instance, Race Across America a randonneur event. I often see the long distance racing kind of biking refered to as ultra cycling.

    Besides that, I'd like to make a few comments...

    The Paris-Brest-Paris race is a type of radonneur event, although I believe they don't carry lights, fenders, or supplies onboard for that event. Night sections are done by motor-pacing behind a car.
    I haven't done PBP, but there is definitely no motor-pacing either at night or day and two separate lighting systems are required. Support cars are not allowed on the route except at the checkpoints.

    I'd doubt that anybody competing in the Paris-Brest would consider it to not be a competitive event...
    I doubt that anyone expecting to finish in more than 60 hours considers it a competitive event . I sure wouldn't.

    I believe there is also a "team" type event that is around 200 or 300 km. Basically, you have 3 or more teammates and you all have to do the ride together and finish together, or within a certain time of each other. I forget the exact name of it, but I want to say it's called a fleche, or something like that. It's one of the events that qualifies when you are going for the super rand medal.
    Yep, it's called a Fleche. There are three to five members in each team, and each team rides to a designated destination on a route designed by each team that has to be at least 360 kilometers. No matter how long the course is, it still has to be completed within 24 hours. It is only counted towards the Randonneur 5000 medal, and it does not count towards the Super Randonneur medal (this only includes the 200, 300, 400 and 600k rides).

    Also that big ride in France (Paris-Brest-Paris) you have to qualify for in order to ride it. It's only held every two years.
    It is correct that you must qualify, and in order to do so one must have done a complete Super Randonneur series earlier in the same year. However, PBP is only held every fourth year (next chance is in 2007).

    /Csson
    Two roads diverged in a wood, and I-
    I took the one less travelled by,
    And that has made all the difference.
    (R. Frost)

  12. #12
    Breaker of Spokes P. B. Walker's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    N. Virginia
    Posts
    493
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by Csson
    However, PBP is only held every fourth year (next chance is in 2007).

    /Csson
    Opps, my bad.

    I wonder why they only hold it every 4 years. It sounds like a very popular ride from what I've heard.

    I could see doing a 200 or 300, but doing 1200 in 90 hours, that just blows my mind.

  13. #13
    Senior Member Falchoon's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2002
    Location
    Oz
    Posts
    884
    Mentioned
    2 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Probably takes that long to recover from riding 1200km...
    If at first you don't succeed, then skydiving definitely isn't for you.

  14. #14
    Senior Member Falchoon's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2002
    Location
    Oz
    Posts
    884
    Mentioned
    2 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    If at first you don't succeed, then skydiving definitely isn't for you.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •