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  1. #1
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    Wall rack with underhooks: bad for exposed cables?

    Hi guys, I just got a new bike and imagined storing it horizontally on one of those wall mounts with the double underhooks (or a free-standing rack with 2 hooks)--you rest the top horizontal bar of the bike on the double underhooks and it self levels or something. I don't have room to store it vertically.

    However, my new bike has the gear and brake lines running under the top horizontal bar (with a small amount of clearance). The gear lines are actually exposed wire and I notice when I was carrying it that I would bend them up to touch the bar if I wasn't careful handling it.

    Question: the bike rack hooks would undoubtedly place a lot of pressure directly on the wires--could this constant pressure damage the brakes, gears, or wires? Or loosen them?

    Suggestions on storage options?

  2. #2
    Conservative Hippie
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    On most bikes there's not enough stand-off between the cables and the frame for something like this to cause enough deflection in the cables to cause damage. But if you're concerned about it you could shift to your smallest chainring, smallest cog and release the brakes before storing the bike on the rack. This will put things in position for the cables to be under the least tension. Yes, this will cross-chain the bike, but it won't matter since you won't be riding it while it's on the rack.

    My Delta Botticelli rack holds four bikes the way you describe. It's really not worth worrying about.

  3. #3
    I like my car ShadowGray's Avatar
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    Aren't there ways of mounting the bike through the saddle?

  4. #4
    been around the block SourDieseL's Avatar
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    Hey guys, I got a questions. I'm new to the forums so excuse me if this topic has already been covered.

    theory to the damage is i live in a studio apt with high ceilings. I've seen those ceiling lifts and wanted to know what people thought about them? Has anyone had any experience using those ceiling levers/pull systems? I'm planning on picking up a Bianchi C2C and believe it is light enough to hoist up and use the space against a wall. Are those pully systems worth it? Are they made well enough for up and down use? I have 16' ceilings so I have plenty of vertical space above.

    Appreciate everyones input.

  5. #5
    your god hates me Bob Ross's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by altec2 View Post
    Question: the bike rack hooks would undoubtedly place a lot of pressure directly on the wires--could this constant pressure damage the brakes, gears, or wires? Or loosen them?
    "A lot" of pressure? I doubt that. As long as you're not also doing chin-ups from the toptube while the bike is in the hooks there's not enough pressure to damage the cables or the brakes just by hanging the bike.

    You do want to be careful not to squeeze the rear brake while the bike is hanging in the hooks; that might put an inordinate amount of tension on the cable (since the weight of the bike pressing against the exposed cable along the toptube will prevent it from moving).

    But it'll be fine for storage purposes. We've got two of our bikes hanging thusly.

  6. #6
    Senior Member
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    Quote Originally Posted by SourDieseL View Post
    Hey guys, I got a questions. I'm new to the forums so excuse me if this topic has already been covered.

    theory to the damage is i live in a studio apt with high ceilings. I've seen those ceiling lifts and wanted to know what people thought about them? Has anyone had any experience using those ceiling levers/pull systems? I'm planning on picking up a Bianchi C2C and believe it is light enough to hoist up and use the space against a wall. Are those pully systems worth it? Are they made well enough for up and down use? I have 16' ceilings so I have plenty of vertical space above.

    Appreciate everyones input.
    I use two of them to stow bikes in the gable of my garage. The mechanical advantage is 4x so you can lift a 25 lb bike with 6.25 lbs of effort. They are very easy to use as is but can be made even easier with these modifications. The part of the line that you pull down on will be going right past either the handlebars or the seat which could cause rubbing or intanglements. With another pulley also mounted near the ceiling you could route the line well away from the bike. But this will negate the working of the jamming mechanism built into the hoist. But its can sometimes be quirky to use, because the angle has to be right, so what you do is buy a jam cleat from a ship's chandler (a place that sells stuff for sailboats) and mount it down close to eye level where it's much easier to use.

    Another consideration is that when with the bike hoisted up there is a lot of line (4x the distance lifted)that must be coiled up and stowed somewhere. For a bachelor, having a cleat with line coiled on it mounted on your wall will enhance the manliness of your apartment. When you get married you will be required to disassemble your bike into its smallest components in stow it in a small compartment behind the sink.

  7. #7
    been around the block SourDieseL's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by MKahrl View Post
    I use two of them to stow bikes in the gable of my garage. The mechanical advantage is 4x so you can lift a 25 lb bike with 6.25 lbs of effort. They are very easy to use as is but can be made even easier with these modifications. The part of the line that you pull down on will be going right past either the handlebars or the seat which could cause rubbing or intanglements. With another pulley also mounted near the ceiling you could route the line well away from the bike. But this will negate the working of the jamming mechanism built into the hoist. But its can sometimes be quirky to use, because the angle has to be right, so what you do is buy a jam cleat from a ship's chandler (a place that sells stuff for sailboats) and mount it down close to eye level where it's much easier to use.

    Another consideration is that when with the bike hoisted up there is a lot of line (4x the distance lifted)that must be coiled up and stowed somewhere. For a bachelor, having a cleat with line coiled on it mounted on your wall will enhance the manliness of your apartment. When you get married you will be required to disassemble your bike into its smallest components in stow it in a small compartment behind the sink.

    Disecting the sarcasm, sounds like you are promoting the product with experience. That I do appreciate! Is there anything in particular I should be looking out for other then additional pulleys or jam cleats? I do have space for me to route additional line and perhaps an additional pulley to avoid the intanglement you speak of, just not sure if it's something sturdy enough.

    Pictures on the net show an additional wood plank mounted to the studs of a ceiling, is this advised? I presume the normal width for the studs would be 2" so to accomodate the mounting of the metal pulley plate, i'd need a wider surface area to anchor on.

    Is there a specific brand of hoist or pulley system I should be looking at? Does one work better then the other?

  8. #8
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    I mounted mine to a plank and then mounted the plank to the ceiling. That way you can space the pulleys lined up with the seat and handlebars and attach the boards with screws that are spaced to go directly into the joists. If the joists are hidden under plasterboard you may need a studfinder to locate them. Four 3" screws should be enough to hold up your bike. I haven't had any problems with mine.

    From what I've seen all the hoists are the same design and probably the same manufacturer just marketed under different names so just look for the lowest price. They used to cost $50 but I've seen them recently for $30.

    You don't need to mess with additional pulleys and jam cleats right away. If you hoist your bike with the downhaul line nearest the seat there isn't much to entangle. Once hoisted with the jam mechanism engaged you will still want to have a regular cleat mounted on the wall at your level as you don't want to trust that jam mechanism as the only thing holding up your bike.

  9. #9
    been around the block SourDieseL's Avatar
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    Thanks MKahrl, I guess I'll look into this further as I have yet to inspect the ceilings of my apt with a stud finder.

  10. #10
    Senior Member DieselDan's Avatar
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    Fail
    Bikes use brakes to stop.

    If your bike has breaks, don't ride it.

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