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  1. #1
    Uber Goober StephenH's Avatar
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    How to carry lots of water? Cool?

    Riding around the neighborhood, I don't need to take any water. On the charity rides, I can just stop at the 10-mile rest stops and tank up. But are there any good solutions for carrying lots of water and/or keeping it cool on longer unsupported rides? I'm thinking a gallon or more.

    Example: Rode 31 miles this afternoon, took 2- 20 oz bottles of water, bought 32 oz & 20 oz bottles of gatorade along the way, plus 44 oz drink = 136 oz, or a little over a gallon.
    "be careful this rando stuff is addictive and dan's the 'pusher'."

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    its called a backpack and these 2 liter plastic soda pop bottles,I carry two of them which is about a gallon.

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    Delusions of Grandeur Dzrtrat's Avatar
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    Long Distance Cyclist Machka's Avatar
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    Well, first, on a ride you need approx. one 750 ml bottle of water and/or sports drink every 1 to 1.5 hours ... depending, of course, on how hot or windy it is.

    So on a 31 mile ride, which might take you 2 hours, you could get away with two 750 ml bottles, or perhaps two 1-litre bottles if it was hot.

    If you want to keep them cool, put them in a little cotton sock ... yes, socks, like what you'd buy in a department store. Ladies socks work better than men's because they are smaller. Soak the sock in water, and the evaporation will keep the bottle cool ... for a while.

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    Senior Member c_m_shooter's Avatar
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    I use a camel back with a 72 ounce bladder and put plenty of ice in it. The backpack insulates the bladder so it stays cool for a few hours. The water in the tube gets warm though. I have rode with some that swore by insulated water bottles, but I haven't tried any yet.
    May your trails be crooked, winding, lonesome, dangerous, leading to the most amazing view.
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    Quote Originally Posted by c_m_shooter View Post
    I use a camel back with a 72 ounce bladder and put plenty of ice in it. The backpack insulates the bladder so it stays cool for a few hours. The water in the tube gets warm though. I have rode with some that swore by insulated water bottles, but I haven't tried any yet.
    I use a Camelbak and the trick to no warm water in the tube is to blow the water back into the bladder after you drink. Clearing the tube of water means it won't get warm because it wont be there to be exposed to the warmer temp.

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    Junior Member madengr's Avatar
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    I have a 100 oz military camelback. It's got polypropylene insulation on the tube (keeps it cool), along with an external fill port. However if it's > 100F out I can drink the whole thing in 7 miles. They do make a 200 oz and 833 oz one too, but that may be a little heavy on the back.
    Last edited by madengr; 06-01-08 at 09:19 PM.

  8. #8
    Senior Member ken cummings's Avatar
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    I've ridden in extreme heat. A couple of frozen plastic gallon milk cartons worked for me.
    This space open

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    Camelbak + two water bottles? It sounds dumb, but might just be enough for the trip.

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    Just a girl on a bike... SpaceNerd's Avatar
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    Camelbak + tube insulator

    Works well for me and its so simple to get a drink that I'm far more inclined to do it than I am with a water bottle.

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    You need a new bike supcom's Avatar
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    for unsupported riding, plan your route so that there are services at reasonable intervals along the way. If you keep the distance between stores no more than 30 miles or so, you shouldn't need more than a 2 liter camelbak and maybe a couple bottles in anything but the hottest temperatures.

    You can also plan your ride so you take a couple hour break around 4-6 PM when the heat is worst. Once the sun gets low, the solar heating drops dramatically.

  12. #12
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    I just picked up a lightweight water purifier for backpacking. I keep having these plans for a long unsupported ride across the Upper Peninsula with my brother and if we ever get around to it would take the purifier with us so all we need is a lake or pond.

  13. #13
    Sensible shoes. CastIron's Avatar
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    Platypus bottles. If I need to haul that kind of water, I use those. Freeze 'em, boil 'em, whatever. When empty they roll up and stuff in a pocket or under your saddle.
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    Senior Member late's Avatar
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    Fill up some bottles, wrap them in towels, and throw them in the panniers.
    We are as gods, we might as well get good at it.
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  15. #15
    Soma Lover
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    Quote Originally Posted by CastIron View Post
    Platypus bottles. If I need to haul that kind of water, I use those. Freeze 'em, boil 'em, whatever. When empty they roll up and stuff in a pocket or under your saddle.
    I use these a lot when backpacking. Given the right pack, they're quite handy.

    Quote Originally Posted by mlts22 View Post
    Camelbak + two water bottles? It sounds dumb, but might just be enough for the trip.
    I started out with 190 ounces for an epic, 40 mile mountain bike ride to Chicken Corners outside of Moab last year on a breezy 96F day. There were two 22 oz. water bottles on the frame, a full 100 oz. Camelbak reservoir on my back, and two more 22 oz. bottles in a pocket of the Camelbak. Two of the bottles got stashed about 6-7 miles into the ride and I had just barely run out of water when we got back to them. The ride took a little over six hours.

  16. #16
    Senior Member GP's Avatar
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    For mountain biking carry a CamelBak.

    For road riding I carry 2 750mls in cages and a 500ml in my pocket if needed. When it's hot and I'm carrying bottle(s) in my pockets, I wear a race cut jersey so it doesn't sag. Then I pour the water from those bottles into the 750s to lighten the load in the pockets.

    I don't need cold water but if I did, I'd fill a Polar bottle halfway and freeze it, then add cold liquid. Then I'd take another Polar bottle, fill it all the way up and freeze it for my second bottle.
    Last edited by GP; 06-02-08 at 01:28 PM.

  17. #17
    Commie
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    2 L cyclone or camelbak. Then the 750ml on the bike, or two if you have space. You can also freeze a couple of aquafina bottles and throw those into the pack. I plan to ride red rock for the first time this weekend, from the loop to the end is 55mi. will start early about 7am and hopefully be done by noon. if i make it heh

  18. #18
    Look! My Spine! RubenX's Avatar
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    Here's what I have done so far... For unsupported self-contained rides:

    * Under 2 hours, use 2 bottles on the bike cages.
    * From 2 to 4 hours, attach handelbar bag with 2 more bottles (and some bars/sandwiches)
    * From 4 to 6 hours, the above plus 2lt camelback. Add some gels too.
    * Over 8 hours, attach rack, strap cooler to rack. Fill cooler with ice, liquids and food.

    My longest unsupported ride was 9.5 hours. But I've found myself modifying a route, searching for a seven-eleven because my water is freekn hot like chicken soup. Some thermal bottles should take care of that problem.... I think.

  19. #19
    Uber Goober StephenH's Avatar
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    Thanks for the ideas, y'all.
    I do sweat more than a lot of fit people due to extra insulation and all, so it does take a lot of liquid.
    On my 31 mile ride, I had a flat on the way out and hit a stiff headwind on the way back, so it was a slow process.
    I didn't realize they made camelbaks in sizes any larger than about 2 liters.
    I've carried a gallon canteen when hiking before, it's doable- and I've run dry while carrying one, too.
    I've used the filters and iodine tablets, but that's more suited to backpacking than riding a bike around town.
    I've noticed if I just stick a 20 oz bottle in my bottle holder, in a half hour, it's warm- doesn't take long.
    "be careful this rando stuff is addictive and dan's the 'pusher'."

  20. #20
    Long Distance Cyclist Machka's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by StephenH View Post
    I've noticed if I just stick a 20 oz bottle in my bottle holder, in a half hour, it's warm- doesn't take long.
    Even with a sock?

  21. #21
    Getting older and slower
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    For mountain bike rides, I've graduated from a Camelbak to a Wingnut Gear Enduro pack. It's designed to hold one 3 L (100 oz) bladder, but a 2nd 3 L bladder will fit in the main compartment. If you freeze the 2nd bladder overnight, you'll be drinking ice water when you switch!

    I had it set up this way for a long (7 hr) MTB ride on Saturday. The weather was cool so after finishing the 1st bladder, I only drank about 1 L of the 2nd bladder. There was still ice in it when I got home!

  22. #22
    Uber Goober StephenH's Avatar
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    I haven't tried the sock- but, to give you an idea, right now, a bit after midnight, they show 79 degrees and 67% humidity, so things don't cool off a whole lot when wet here.
    "be careful this rando stuff is addictive and dan's the 'pusher'."

  23. #23
    Long Distance Cyclist Machka's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by StephenH View Post
    I haven't tried the sock- but, to give you an idea, right now, a bit after midnight, they show 79 degrees and 67% humidity, so things don't cool off a whole lot when wet here.

    That's like the weather in Manitoba in the middle of summer ... hot and humid. However, when you ride, you create wind which blows against your bottle, and if your bottle is encased in something wet, the air around your bottle will be cooler.

    Along the same lines, if you soaked your cotton T-shirt in cold water and then went for a ride, you'd be chilly for a while. (Wicking T-shirts and jerseys don't have quite the same effect)

    What I've done is to fill my bottle to about 7/8ths full, then freeze it. When I take it out of the freezer for my ride, I soak the sock and go. The coolness of the melting water and sock effect doesn't last forever, but it helps.

  24. #24
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    I can't imagine carrying much water on my person. The frame of a bike suffers a lot less when you add a little weight to it than a rider's body. Toss a couple quart-sized gatorades into the trunk on your rear rack, put a couple bottles in cages, and go.

    I sweat and get too uncomfortable with something riding on my back. If you don't want to go the rack and trunk route, you could also get one of those 'behind the seat' bottle holders too. They can hold a couple more cage-sized bottles, in addition to the two bolted to your frame.
    Cannondale Synapse Sport 5

  25. #25
    Uber Goober StephenH's Avatar
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    It's 11:35 at night, and it's 82 degrees with 71% humidity, supposed to cool off to 77 degrees by the morning when I leave out. Fortunately, this is a supported ride.
    "be careful this rando stuff is addictive and dan's the 'pusher'."

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