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  1. #1
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    Best Hybrid Bike for a newbie

    So i've been looking into buying a Hybrid bicycle with front fork suspension and seat post suspension. This seems to be the best type of bike for me since i like to ride on bumpy NYC streets and the little unknown areas. Plus i mostly like to ride along a 4 mile flat strip of paved bicycle road next to the sea so the speed will come in handy. But the thing is, i really only want to spend around $350 and under. I saw some LBS Schwinns that were in the upper 200's that looked pretty good. What's a good hybrid bike around this price range?

  2. #2
    Senior Member Kimmitt's Avatar
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    Giant Suede. It rides completely differently.

  3. #3
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    Are you sure that's a hybrid? It looks more like a comfort bike.

  4. #4
    Senior Member Kimmitt's Avatar
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    Heh, I'm so used to hearing them interchangeably, I'm not sure which is supposed to be which.

  5. #5
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    Well the only difference i know of is that comfort bikes have mountain bike type tires while hybrids have road bike type tires

  6. #6
    Senior Member envane's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Cheezburger View Post
    Well the only difference i know of is that comfort bikes have mountain bike type tires while hybrids have road bike type tires
    There are three main types of "hybrids", which just confuses everyone:

    1) MTB frame with slicks (26" or 700c wheels)
    2) Road bike with flat bars
    3) "Comfort" bikes (super-upright MTB frame with lots of suspension and a big padded saddle).

    I suggest a Specialized Sirrus, since its a flat-bar road bike with seatpost suspension. I would avoid anything with front suspension. Eventually, you'll get rid of the seatpost suspesion, but a rigid seatpost is cheap compared to replacing a fork.

    I ride the streets of Chicago 100% rigid. You'll get the hang of it.

  7. #7
    Conquer Cancer rider Boudicca's Avatar
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    Agreed on the front suspension. I have it on my hybrid (Rocky Mountain Whistler) and really don't need it, even on the worst of the Toronto potholes. It adds weight and (I think) subtracts from the performance. Only time I really did like it was when I hurt my shoulder and needed the extra comfort, but even there I would have been fine if I'd just taken things a little more slowly.
    Zero gallons to the mile

  8. #8
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    If you lose the suspension fork and opt for a fatter tyre you will get most of the conmfort for a fraction of the weight. The bike will ride better and need less maintenance. Im using Schwalbe Big Apple 2" tyres on my commuter, they are not cheap but they are quite efficient and fast compared to other tyres I have used.
    Most seatpost suspension is OK when new but if you use it heavily, eg a couple of miles every day, it will wear and the saddle will move from size to side. This makes riding much more tiring. Experienced riders deal with rough ground by transferring some weight from butt to hands and feet.


    The brand of hybrid is probably less important than the shop. Bikes come partially assembled and a good shop will check the final assembly. They will also be there when you need a tube up (due to stretched cables) and for advise on getting the correct size and suitable accessories.

  9. #9
    Velocommuter Commando Sirrus Rider's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by envane View Post
    There are three main types of "hybrids", which just confuses everyone:

    1) MTB frame with slicks (26" or 700c wheels)
    2) Road bike with flat bars
    3) "Comfort" bikes (super-upright MTB frame with lots of suspension and a big padded saddle).

    I suggest a Specialized Sirrus, since its a flat-bar road bike with seatpost suspension. I would avoid anything with front suspension. Eventually, you'll get rid of the seatpost suspesion, but a rigid seatpost is cheap compared to replacing a fork.

    I ride the streets of Chicago 100% rigid. You'll get the hang of it.
    +1 On the Sirrus; however, I would 86 the suspension seat post (It's too soft and inconsistent at returning to the same point after absorbing a bump) with a Salsa rigid seat post and a Brooks Flyer.
    Riding 19 Years of Specialized Sirrus Tradition.
    Live in Houston? Come to http://bicyclecommutehouston.blogspot.com/
    1988 Specialized Sirrus, 1989 Alpine Monitor Pass MTB, 2007 Specialized Sirrus 700C hybrid, 2007 Schwinn Town & Country trike, 1970 "Resto-Improved" Raleigh 20, 1970 "WIP" Raleigh 20, and 1980 "WIP" Schwinn Town & Country trike

  10. #10
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    Hmm thanks for the input guys. I was actually test riding some hybrids the other day and found the one with seatpost + fork suspension very nice. The suspension was like how a brand new car's would feel. But yea i guess it could wear out and be a pain to maintain / fix. Maybe i will just stick to no suspension bike as a first. I'll check out the Sirrus.

  11. #11
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    2000 Montague CX, I do not recommend it, but still ride it.
    Strida 3, I recommend it for rides < 10mi wo steep hills.
    2006 Rowbike 720 Sport, I recommend it as an exercise bike.
    1996 Birdy, Recommend.
    Wieleder CARiBIKE (folding), decent frame.

  12. #12
    bike wannabee
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sirrus Rider View Post
    +1 On the Sirrus; however, I would 86 the suspension seat post (It's too soft and inconsistent at returning to the same point after absorbing a bump) with a Salsa rigid seat post and a Brooks Flyer.
    totally agree, if you have back problems they can be good but you may find that they make efficient riding difficult, for one you are never at optimum height from the pedals, as it is constantly changing.
    and two in my opinion they can make mounting more difficult for beginners. Many beginners like to be able to stand close to flat footed over the seat so their seat height is already too low, with the suspended seatpost the seat is quite high to start with so you have to really stretch to get on then it sinks so far that you are way below the optimum seat height, the more you weight the worst it is. the older the seat post is the worse it is. I'm not saying don't get one, comfort can be very important, just something to be aware of. choose the best bike then add a seatpost if you need it.

  13. #13
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    I am a newbie just got back into bikes after going with a friend who wanted a new bike to a bike shop.
    The bike shop was nice enough to allow us both to take a couple bikes for a 20min ride on a path along the riverfront.

    He bought a Giant Sadona comfort bike,I bought a KHS Hybrid, His wife got a Raleigh Venture 4.0

    We switch back and forth and there are no great differences between them and price is very close.
    Find the shop that gives you the best service and price over the brand.
    Most bikes in the same price range seem to have the same components.

    I like the front fork and seatpost suspension and am not serious enough of a rider to care if it takes away any performance. I also like sitting upright more than my old mountain bike and its geared much better than my mountain bike for the road.
    These style bikes are selling like crazy in my area and hard to find
    For a newbie if its uncomfortable you won't ride it like my old bike.

    Get the bike your comfortable on

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