Cycling and bicycle discussion forums. 
   Click here to join our community Log in to access your Control Panel  


Go Back   > >

General Cycling Discussion Have a cycling related question or comment that doesn't fit in one of the other specialty forums? Drop on in and post in here! When possible, please select the forum above that most fits your post!

User Tag List

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Old 08-15-08, 07:43 AM   #1
dromond
Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Jun 2008
Bikes:
Posts: 27
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Has anyone had bad bike mojo?

I am feeling finicky and need support from fellow bike nerds. For a while now I've been looking for the perfect sport-road bike. I've ridden and wrenched on bikes (mostly unprofessionally) for many years and wanted this to be the right bike. I mostly ride mountain bikes so trying all different sorts of rides out has been a fun and new experience. Yesterday I was visiting a friend in Cambridge (~100 miles from home) and checking out bikes at a nearby shop. I took one for a long test ride that fit very well, rode nicely seemed to really fit the bill. It was marked down a bit to boot. Wahoo! The search is over. Paid, done.

Then on the drive home (yes, drive) I start to experience what I can only describe as "bad bike mojo." I couldn't stop myself from thinking about how perhaps this wasn't the right choice, that it was too overbuilt, too gimmicky, etc. I pretty much felt sick to my stomach and half considered turning around and begging the shop to let me return it - at 9pm.

Basically, the bike is perfectly fine and will suit my purposes. But for some indescribable (some might say crazy) reason I just am having a hard time feeling good about the new ride. Do I stick it out until we learn to love one another arranged-marriage style? Or do I trust my gut and submit to fate, knowing I might take a hit for peace of mind.

Sincerely,
finicky bike nerd


*exact bike withheld due to inevitable varying bike prejudices.
dromond is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-15-08, 08:43 AM   #2
bikecrate
Senior Member
 
bikecrate's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2005
Location: LF, APMAT
Bikes:
Posts: 1,308
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 35 Post(s)
You are experiencing buyer's remorse. It will pass. I have the same problem. I just bought a new road bike. I didn't really need it and my older one works fine, so I felt a little guilty. I always feel guilty when I indulge myself. However, riding it makes me happy and I'm sure the more you ride yours the better you'll feel about it.
bikecrate is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-15-08, 10:06 AM   #3
cachehiker
Soma Lover
 
Join Date: Dec 2004
Location: Logan, UT
Bikes: one bike for every day of the week
Posts: 765
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Been there. Still have buyer's remorse about a full suspension frame I picked up but I'm going to slap it together and get it out on the trail anyway. I won't know how I really like it until then. I had buyer's remorse on my first full suspension bike as well. After building up the Zaskar, I ended up with two bikes with very similar geometry and sold the full suspension when it was still just a year old to limit my losses to $400. If I had it to do over again, I'd probably still buy it though. My Backwoods was trashed and I would've otherwise been without a mountain rig.

How about seller's remorse? I've acquired eight bikes over the last 15 years and absolutely loved five of them. I regret having sold the old Bianchi hybrid to a family member but I think I will reacquire it in another year or so. I want to set it up with studded tires.
cachehiker is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-15-08, 10:51 AM   #4
bwunger
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2008
Location: Kent, WA
Bikes: '07 Specialized Tarmac Pro
Posts: 315
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
I only get buyers remorse when I waste my money, so that's the question I'd ask you. Do you feel you wasted your money? In my case, I bought a road bike, even though I already had a hard tail MTB and a full suspension MTB. I ride the road bike 4-5 times a week though, so I really glad I got it. I got it on sale, so I think I got a good deal on it too. So, if you'll use the bike, and perhaps if it makes you ride more, count it as money well spent.
bwunger is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-15-08, 11:58 AM   #5
Zan
Senior Member
 
Zan's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2007
Location: Waterloo, ONT
Bikes: Road: Trek 1.5 (2007). Mountain: Santa Cruz Chameleon (2008). Beater: Peugeot Recorde du Monde (1850)
Posts: 1,417
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
i was fearing having buyer's remorse when i bought my SC Chameleon. i suppose you adults have a different view on things when it comes to buying a bike. my chameleon was two years worth of wages... so if it turned out i didn't like the bike, i'd be screwed.

oh well... i love the bike .

dromond, you know what help you relax and put your mind at ease? a nice long bike ride .
Zan is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-15-08, 12:13 PM   #6
Ed in GA
The "now retired" Old Guy
 
Ed in GA's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2008
Location: Savannah, GA, USA
Bikes: Trek Madone 4.5
Posts: 546
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
It's a combination of Buyers Remorse and "Did I really buy what I wanted or should have gotten the next better one?"

Coming to these forums doesn't help that either. You just bought the 4000 and everybody's posting about how much better the 5000 is. So, you wonder if what you bought will be good enough.

Last edited by Ed in GA; 08-15-08 at 12:18 PM.
Ed in GA is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-15-08, 12:35 PM   #7
xenologer
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2008
Bikes:
Posts: 2,064
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1 Post(s)
Just do a bunch of custom modifications and adjustments to the bike to personalize it. Then you won't worry so much.
At the very least, get the seat post and handlebars to your height, maybe adjust the brakes and derailers that aren't perfectly assembled?
xenologer is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-15-08, 01:08 PM   #8
Cannondaler
Senior Member
 
Cannondaler's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2007
Location: Atlantic Beach, FL
Bikes: Cannondale F600sl, Windsor Falkirk Carbon
Posts: 205
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
I am certain that in six months, maybe less, you will absolutely adore your new bike.
Cannondaler is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-15-08, 03:12 PM   #9
mawtangent
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2007
Bikes:
Posts: 273
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Maybe you were into the excitement of the"chase," finding the perfect bike, maybe you had been looking for a while, spending a lot of time researching and thinking about what you wanted to get, and then "bang," all of a sudden you found a bike, bought it...and the hunt (and the excitement of the chase) had come to an abrubt end. Maybe you feel a bit lost, not knowing how to fill up that time and energy that had been spent in the hunt. I've been there. From a logical standpoint you got the bike you had searched for, so now enjoy it, and, with the bike purchase out of the way, pursue some other goal that will enrich your life.
mawtangent is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-15-08, 03:32 PM   #10
rmfnla
Senior Member
 
rmfnla's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2005
Location: La La Land (We love it!)
Bikes: Gilmour road, Curtlo road; both steel (of course)
Posts: 6,049
Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 155 Post(s)
Geez, look at all the amateur therapists...

Dude, just go riding and all will become clear.
__________________
Today, I believe my jurisdiction ends here...
rmfnla is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-15-08, 04:08 PM   #11
Andy_K 
Senior Member
 
Andy_K's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2008
Location: Beaverton, OR
Bikes: 2013 Kona Jake, 2015 Kona Jake the Snake, 2008 Kona Major Jake, 2013 Kona Jake the Snake, 2006 Kona Kula, 2012 Ridley Excalibur, 2001 LeMond Buenos Aires, 1984 Pinarello Gran Turismo, 1982 Trek 614, 1978 Austro-Daimler, 1987 Pinarello Montello
Posts: 8,927
Mentioned: 13 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 218 Post(s)
Your problem is that your are objectivfying your bike. You are relating to it in what Martin Buber calls an "I-it" way. To truly reach the sort of deeply satisfying relationship you want with your bike you have to get beyond seeing it as an object to be used and begin seeing it as a fellow manifestation of the goodness of creation.

If you see your bike as just a tool which can potentially be replaced with something better, then you will always want something better, no matter how good your bike is. You must step beyond that and recognize this is no longer just some metal conglomoration that rolled off a factory floor somewhere. This is now your bike. It is inherently better than some shiny other bike on the LBS floor in that this is your bike and that one is not, and even if you let this bike rust in the garage or sell it on Craigslist, you will never escape the fact that it has been a part of your life. You have a permanent relatedness to this bike.

Don't hold back. Give yourself to this bike.
Andy_K is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-15-08, 08:01 PM   #12
CB HI
Cycle Year Round
 
CB HI's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2005
Location: Honolulu, HI
Bikes:
Posts: 12,047
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 250 Post(s)
"(some might say crazy)"

Exactly what I was thinking before I got to that paragraph.
CB HI is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-15-08, 09:21 PM   #13
Throwmeabone
Senior Member
 
Throwmeabone's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2007
Bikes:
Posts: 239
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by Andy_K View Post
Your problem is that your are objectivfying your bike. You are relating to it in what Martin Buber calls an "I-it" way. To truly reach the sort of deeply satisfying relationship you want with your bike you have to get beyond seeing it as an object to be used and begin seeing it as a fellow manifestation of the goodness of creation.

If you see your bike as just a tool which can potentially be replaced with something better, then you will always want something better, no matter how good your bike is. You must step beyond that and recognize this is no longer just some metal conglomoration that rolled off a factory floor somewhere. This is now your bike. It is inherently better than some shiny other bike on the LBS floor in that this is your bike and that one is not, and even if you let this bike rust in the garage or sell it on Craigslist, you will never escape the fact that it has been a part of your life. You have a permanent relatedness to this bike.

Don't hold back. Give yourself to this bike.
That was deep.. I will think about that on my next ride
Throwmeabone is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-16-08, 01:56 PM   #14
dromond
Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Jun 2008
Bikes:
Posts: 27
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Well I've quite enjoyed all of the amateur psychology. Thanks for humoring my oddness. The real answer to this story is so good that I can't quite believe it.

The bike is a Trek Portland. I got is as a touring bike, occasional long distance/winter commuter, and recreational road bike. (Recreational in the sense that I often ride with people who happen to be slower than me in the first place, so keeping up on group rides is not a big concern.) After work yesterday I took the bike out for a ride. I did some sprints, climbs and generally tried to get the brakes bedded in. (Luckily I've had the same Avid discs on my mountain bike for years and know how to set them up.) Then of course it starts to pour rain, as it has every day this summer it seems. I said to myself "screw it, it's a rain bike" and kept riding. I started to really get into the stable handling that inspired me to buy it, as well of the quite ride and grip of 28c tires on rough roads and other surfaces.

As the rain started coming down in buckets and I got more of a feel for the bike I really began to enjoy myself and felt better about the whole thing. I start messing around with the traction, stopping short on wet dirt paths, drifting around in puddles; generally being an idiot. I was psyched about of versatility mixed with relatively good speed on the open road and was having a blast. I rode a short, steep grassy embankment that ended abruptly in a soaking wet sewer grate. As the bike flew out from under me and I scraped several ounces of flesh onto the pavement I let out a holler that was probably heard in the next town. I picked myself up and proceeded to gush blood all over the bike as I pedaled home with a big, wincing smile on my face. From that point on I knew that the bike and I were cool. The ladyfriend who has been watching my emo bike saga with an astounding level of patience and some level of amusement had quite the sight when I came knocking on the door drenched in watery blood with my new best friend.

This morning I went for a short road ride and it felt so natural. I could ride and ride but of course had to go home at some point to do some work. Speaking of which...


Quote:
Originally Posted by bwunger View Post
I only get buyers remorse when I waste my money, so that's the question I'd ask you. Do you feel you wasted your money? In my case, I bought a road bike, even though I already had a hard tail MTB and a full suspension MTB. I ride the road bike 4-5 times a week though, so I really glad I got it. I got it on sale, so I think I got a good deal on it too. So, if you'll use the bike, and perhaps if it makes you ride more, count it as money well spent.
Not a waste of money. I was afraid of such remorse for similar reasons (I ride plenty of other bikes already) so I refused to cave and get a road bike until I knew I was going to make use of it. After mile marker 3,000 on my flexy 70's era Fuji I knew it was time.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Zan View Post
...dromond, you know what help you relax and put your mind at ease? a nice long bike ride .
Correctamundo.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Ed in GA View Post
It's a combination of Buyers Remorse and "Did I really buy what I wanted or should have gotten the next better one?"

Coming to these forums doesn't help that either. You just bought the 4000 and everybody's posting about how much better the 5000 is. So, you wonder if what you bought will be good enough.
It wasn't so much a question of better but different. In the end of was trying to decide between this, and OCR 1 and a Salsa Casserole that I would have to special order and purchase unridden. I enjoyed the OCR but the handling and overall sportiness of the bike made light touring seem workable, but a stretch. The stock brakes were also mediocre.

I think that the Salsa would have been great, and cooler in a variety of ways. However, the rims seemed on the wide side (comes stock with 32c tires) and it was too big of a purchase for me to make without throwing a leg over it.

I had some misgivings about discs on a road bike, and still do. I'm not sold on the overall benefit outside of riding in the wet and it almost stopped me from buying the bike. But in the end they are solid brakes that work well. I was already familiar with setting them an the $200 discount on the bike sort of made up for the extra expense. The only problem is that finding good 130mm disc hubs when I want new wheels will be a pain.

Quote:
Originally Posted by xenologer View Post
Just do a bunch of custom modifications and adjustments to the bike to personalize it. Then you won't worry so much.
At the very least, get the seat post and handlebars to your height, maybe adjust the brakes and derailers that aren't perfectly assembled?
I can't wait to get this bike fit perfectly.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Cannondaler View Post
I am certain that in six months, maybe less, you will absolutely adore your new bike.
It took closer to 6 hours.

Quote:
Originally Posted by mawtangent View Post
Maybe you were into the excitement of the"chase," finding the perfect bike, maybe you had been looking for a while, spending a lot of time researching and thinking about what you wanted to get, and then "bang," all of a sudden you found a bike, bought it...and the hunt (and the excitement of the chase) had come to an abrubt end. Maybe you feel a bit lost, not knowing how to fill up that time and energy that had been spent in the hunt. I've been there. From a logical standpoint you got the bike you had searched for, so now enjoy it, and, with the bike purchase out of the way, pursue some other goal that will enrich your life.
While I do my best to keep the gear-*****-ness in check by buying only what I use regularly, I am definitely guilty of this. I love the fun of specing everything out, testing and generally finding ways to make things work better. I think you are spot on about not knowing what to do with myself after finding the right thing. It makes you think about what is really most important. The whole general "chase' for a better life can be such a mind game in and of itself.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Andy_K View Post
Your problem is that your are objectivfying your bike. You are relating to it in what Martin Buber calls an "I-it" way. To truly reach the sort of deeply satisfying relationship you want with your bike you have to get beyond seeing it as an object to be used and begin seeing it as a fellow manifestation of the goodness of creation.

If you see your bike as just a tool which can potentially be replaced with something better, then you will always want something better, no matter how good your bike is. You must step beyond that and recognize this is no longer just some metal conglomoration that rolled off a factory floor somewhere. This is now your bike. It is inherently better than some shiny other bike on the LBS floor in that this is your bike and that one is not, and even if you let this bike rust in the garage or sell it on Craigslist, you will never escape the fact that it has been a part of your life. You have a permanent relatedness to this bike.

Don't hold back. Give yourself to this bike.
Like, whoah. I would heckle you if I wasn't being so crazy and you weren't, well.... correct.


Quote:
Originally Posted by CB HI View Post
"(some might say crazy)"

Exactly what I was thinking before I got to that paragraph.
Not all of us can handle round-the-clock 24/7 sanity. As a good friend of mine said once when someone accused him of being obsessed with bikes: "Well, you have to be obsessed with something."


cheers everybody
dromond is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-18-08, 04:05 PM   #15
Andy_K 
Senior Member
 
Andy_K's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2008
Location: Beaverton, OR
Bikes: 2013 Kona Jake, 2015 Kona Jake the Snake, 2008 Kona Major Jake, 2013 Kona Jake the Snake, 2006 Kona Kula, 2012 Ridley Excalibur, 2001 LeMond Buenos Aires, 1984 Pinarello Gran Turismo, 1982 Trek 614, 1978 Austro-Daimler, 1987 Pinarello Montello
Posts: 8,927
Mentioned: 13 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 218 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by dromond View Post
Like, whoah. I would heckle you if I wasn't being so crazy and you weren't, well.... correct.
I can't believe nobody did heckle me. I tried to be as over-the-top as I could.

But, in the end, I do think that my load of b.s. is, at its core, fundamentally sound.
Andy_K is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-20-08, 10:47 AM   #16
PunkMartyr
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2007
Bikes:
Posts: 467
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
I didn't have any bike buyers remorse. The bike physically looks like something I would mate with if I were a bike. Therefore, it provides an aesthetic pleasure just sitting around my house. Its almost like its earning its keep even when I'm not riding.
PunkMartyr is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off



All times are GMT -6. The time now is 11:48 AM.