Cycling and bicycle discussion forums. 
   Click here to join our community Log in to access your Control Panel  


Go Back   > >

General Cycling Discussion Have a cycling related question or comment that doesn't fit in one of the other specialty forums? Drop on in and post in here! When possible, please select the forum above that most fits your post!

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Old 02-25-04, 05:50 PM   #1
Artie
Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Feb 2004
Location: Jacksonville, Fl USA
Bikes: Trek 412 (1982)
Posts: 44
Curious about ancillary weight.

I was just wondering, from Pro's and amatuers, how much extra weight, if any, do you generally carry with you on a ride?

I'm thinking of anything that isn't you and your bare-minimum bike. Such as, bike computers, water bottles, heart monitors, wrist-watch, cell-phones, walkmans, etc., etc.

Thanks all, Artie

Edit: Heh - I just wanted to add - this isn't a trick question where I'm going to lambast anyone for carrying a cell-phone after spending all that money on helium-filled spokes.
I'm just curious.
Artie is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-25-04, 05:57 PM   #2
gwhunt23
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2003
Location: Richmond, VA
Bikes:
Posts: 613
I usually carry 2 waterbottles, but I use CamelBacks for races. I also have my kickstand (yes I still use one), and the computer. Along with the head and tail lights.
gwhunt23 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-25-04, 06:01 PM   #3
Artie
Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Feb 2004
Location: Jacksonville, Fl USA
Bikes: Trek 412 (1982)
Posts: 44
Do you have a rough guess what that might weigh? Maybe a pound or two?
Artie is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-25-04, 06:34 PM   #4
gwhunt23
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2003
Location: Richmond, VA
Bikes:
Posts: 613
Quote:
Originally Posted by Artie
Do you have a rough guess what that might weigh? Maybe a pound or two?
Hmmm...

2 Waterbottles = 2 lbs.
Kickstand = .75 lbs.
Computer = .25 lbs
Head and tail lights = .25 lbs.

All in all, about 3.25 pounds of extra weight. I am not a big weight freak myself though.
gwhunt23 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-25-04, 06:39 PM   #5
hillyman
520 CLUB
 
Join Date: Mar 2002
Bikes:
Posts: 1,009
I wouldn't worry about weight. Just take what you want or need. On level ground worrying about weight is silly. I suggest putting tape over the mph/kph part of your computer and only pay attention to the distance you set to ride. Just ride to enjoy the ride
hillyman is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-25-04, 07:03 PM   #6
RonH
Life is good
 
RonH's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2001
Location: Not far from the Withlacoochee Trail. 🚴🏻
Bikes: My beloved 2001 Litespeed Tuscany and my 2014 Cannondale SuperSix EVO Hi-Mod
Posts: 15,908
I carry two water bottles (and my Camelback in summer), frame pump, and a seat pack containing stuff for emergencies (spare tube, patch kit, $$$, tire levers, Topeak Alien multitool, and folding reading glasses so my old tired eyes can see small things like holes in the tube, screw threads, chain links, etc.).

I'm guessing that all these necessary items weigh <5 pounds, excluding water.

I don't count light things like cyclocomputer and PowerGel. If I counted those things I'd also have to include gloves, helmet, base layer and wind breaker on cold days, leg warmers for the ride home if it turns cool, etc.


Just take along what you feel you need and enjoy riding.
__________________


And Jesus looking upon them saith, "With men it is impossible, but not with God: for with God all things are possible." - Mark 10:27
RonH is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-25-04, 07:32 PM   #7
Artie
Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Feb 2004
Location: Jacksonville, Fl USA
Bikes: Trek 412 (1982)
Posts: 44
Thanks for the feedback so far folks. I'm not really concerned with weight per se, but perhaps I should explain why I'm asking.

I've been in the field of electronics and computers my whole working career, and am a bit of a techno-geek at heart. I also dabble in programming and remote sensors and all things electronics. Since I'm getting in to cycling late in life, (50 ish), I would like to carry a small laptop computer, perhaps in a backpack, with a program I wrote that will monitor and record all parameters of my initial cycle progress.

It'll be an easy matter for me to construct very light-weight sensors to monitor speed, tire and pedal RPM, front and rear gear selection, braking, and perhaps even bio-data: heart rate, etc. Plus, time, distance, date, temp, etc.

It could be fun to chart and analyze this data as I progress. It might be interesting to others who might want to do this same thing. Or not.

So anyway, I mainly wanted to see how far off kilter a 6 or 7 pound computer would skew my "data conditions" from the "norm".

ARtie
Artie is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-25-04, 08:19 PM   #8
Jean Beetham Smith 
Slow Moving Vehicle
 
Jean Beetham Smith's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2000
Location: Norwood, MA
Bikes: Felt F-70, Terry Madeleine, Novara Safari fully customized by me
Posts: 1,068
If you are talking to the pure "roadies", that is a lot of weight. If you are talking to the commuters, that is lunch and a change of clothes. If you are talking to the touring folk, that is nothing. If it warms the cockles of your techie heart, go for it. It isn't going to mean anything to anyone but you unless you plan on publishing your results. Have fun on your bike and computers.
__________________
Help grow the future of cycling in the world. Volunteer at your local "earn-a-bike" program. In the Boston area http://www.bikesnotbombs.org/about

Last edited by Jean Beetham Smith; 02-25-04 at 08:27 PM.
Jean Beetham Smith is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-25-04, 10:17 PM   #9
Mtn Mike
Super Biker
 
Mtn Mike's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2002
Location: Spokane WA
Bikes: 2008 Lapierre X-Lite, 2006 Serotta Coeur d’Acier, 2005 Independent Fabrication Steel Delux, 2003 Surly 1x1, 2003 Surly Cross Check, 1986 Schwin Worldsport SS commuter, 1980's Mongoose Supergoose
Posts: 1,183
On my rides, I carry about 30 lbs of extra body weight. I'm 6'2'' and 220 lbs, but my ideal cycling weight would be about 190 lbs, so I consider it training weight. Sure my computers and bottle weigh something, but not nearly as much in comparison.
Mtn Mike is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-25-04, 11:34 PM   #10
Xtrmyorick
Senior Member
 
Xtrmyorick's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2003
Location: Walla Walla
Bikes: Torelli Titanio with full Chorus and Eurus wheels
Posts: 603
Quote:
Originally Posted by Artie
I've been in the field of electronics and computers my whole working career, and am a bit of a techno-geek at heart. I also dabble in programming and remote sensors and all things electronics. Since I'm getting in to cycling late in life, (50 ish), I would like to carry a small laptop computer, perhaps in a backpack, with a program I wrote that will monitor and record all parameters of my initial cycle progress.

It'll be an easy matter for me to construct very light-weight sensors to monitor speed, tire and pedal RPM, front and rear gear selection, braking, and perhaps even bio-data: heart rate, etc. Plus, time, distance, date, temp, etc.
Just get something like the Polar S720i or the Ciclosport HAC4. Both monitor basically everything you want, except gear selection and braking. They both also have an altimeter and various other features (each has over 50 different functions I believe).

They also both allow you to intterface with a computer to download and analyze all your data.
Xtrmyorick is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-26-04, 06:41 AM   #11
DnvrFox
Banned.
 
DnvrFox's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2001
Bikes:
Posts: 20,916
Quote:
Originally Posted by Artie
Since I'm getting in to cycling late in life, (50 ish),


Naw, you are getting into cycling EARLY in life.

By the way, why do you feel that your age is a reason for monitoring your body? I don't see the relationship? Seems to me if you want to monitor your body, it makes no difference what age you are???

Started young at 58, and now younger at 64!
DnvrFox is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-26-04, 07:03 AM   #12
Ed Holland
8speed DinoSORAs
 
Ed Holland's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2002
Location: Oxford, UK or Mountain View, Ca
Bikes:
Posts: 2,749
If I am just riding, a spare tube, pump, 'phone, multi tool, banana and water bottle do not add a great deal. The backpack that carries goods for commuting can get heavy. At the start of this week I had all the bike sundries, plus the week's working clothes and a new pair of football boots for the game after work. The bag weighed in at 6.7 kilos! (a shade under 15 pounds). I weighed the bike, an old "frankenbike" road machine and that tipped the scales at 11.4 Kg (circa 25 lbs). It helps to think of this "ballast" as a training aid....

Cheers,

Ed
__________________
Get a bicycle. You will certainly not regret it, if you live.
Ed Holland is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-26-04, 07:15 AM   #13
Al.canoe
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2003
Bikes:
Posts: 1,295
I use a rear rack with a rack bag in addition to a hydration pack. I carry tools, tube, pump, lights, 1st aid kit, cell phone, a shell (jacket) and possibly another shirt to layer if conditions warrant. I generally ride 35+ miles and I don't worry about weight even in hilly areas. I just use lower gears: our road bikes have ATB gearing. I manage to cruise about 16 mph on level ground & no wind with 38 mm tires. I'm about to switch to narrower rims and 25 mm tires to get a little more speed. I'm also 64 and started mountain biking at about 58, road biking at 61.

Al
Al.canoe is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-26-04, 12:37 PM   #14
MichaelW
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2001
Location: England
Bikes:
Posts: 12,920
I think I carry about 4lbs of extras on a ride.
A laptop might be a bit heavy, fragile, and battery hungry compared to something smaller. Can you find yourself a psion mini-computer or one of those dinky palm things.
MichaelW is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-26-04, 04:51 PM   #15
Artie
Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Feb 2004
Location: Jacksonville, Fl USA
Bikes: Trek 412 (1982)
Posts: 44
Quote:
Originally Posted by Xtrmyorick
Just get something like the Polar S720i or the Ciclosport HAC4. Both monitor basically everything you want, except gear selection and braking. They both also have an altimeter and various other features (each has over 50 different functions I believe).

They also both allow you to intterface with a computer to download and analyze all your data.
Those were both interesting devices, but one of them cost more than my whole Trek bike. (Albeit, at 1982 prices.)

Part of the reason I want to try this is for purely "hobbiest" reasons, kinda like the model train guy who would spend weeks hand building a locomotive when he can just buy one at the hobby store. I already own the laptop, and I can build all the sensors for around $20.

Also, I can write my own software, which means the program will do exactly what I want it to do. If this project gets off the ground, I'll post the "code" and results.

Regardless, I want to thank all of you for posting your info. There was some interesting stuff in there.

Oh yeah . . . and thanks to some of you for making me feel like a young 'un.

Artie
Artie is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off



All times are GMT -6. The time now is 07:15 PM.