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Old 09-15-08, 12:28 PM   #1
Rockrivr1
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Can you be a good MTBer and Road rider at the same time?

I've been riding my MTB for years now, but have taken up road riding this year as well. I guess it's new and I enjoy it as well. Because I enjoy both I've been switching back and forth between the two as I ride 2-4 times a week.

I can't say for sure, but I think doing this is hurting how I ride each. Positioning on the bike and methods to successfully ride these two bikes seem to me to be different. It takes me a bit to get my body used to the MTB after riding the road bike and vis versa. After I get "re-acquanted" with the bike I'm riding things seem to be fine during the ride, but I'm wondering if it hurts my overall performance on the particular bike I'm on. Plus, does it mess up my muscle memory as I switch back and forth between the two bikes?

Just something I've been wondering. What do you think?
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Old 09-15-08, 12:37 PM   #2
edbikebabe
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I know lots of people that race both road & mountain (and are competitive at both).

I agree with the "bike fit" issue. Whichever bike I haven't been riding always feels weird when I get on it after riding something else.
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Old 09-15-08, 12:38 PM   #3
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Sure you can. It's like people who are good at both surfing and snowboarding
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Old 09-15-08, 12:39 PM   #4
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John Tomac succesfully raced for 7-eleven in Europe on road bikes while also competing in the MTB world cup and US circuits in both XC and DH.

Multiple guys like Kabush, Frischnekt, Wiens, Cadel Evans, etc., do/did most of their training on road bikes (while Evans was still MTB racing).

AFAIK their reasoning was something about intervals and consistency being easier when you're not worried about either clipping a tree or clearing obstacles.
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Old 09-15-08, 12:55 PM   #5
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I started road riding this year and I feel the opposite. When I'm on singletrack, I thank myself for the fitness levels I get on the road bike. When I'm dodging potholes on the road, I'm glad I have mtb handling skills.
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