Cycling and bicycle discussion forums. 
   Click here to join our community Log in to access your Control Panel  


Go Back   > >

General Cycling Discussion Have a cycling related question or comment that doesn't fit in one of the other specialty forums? Drop on in and post in here! When possible, please select the forum above that most fits your post!

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Old 09-16-08, 06:11 PM   #1
tntyz
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
tntyz's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2008
Location: Nabob, WI
Bikes: '03 Trek 7500, '08 Madone 4.5
Posts: 1,176
I need convincing

I'm starting to think about getting off of my hybrid (Trek 7500) and onto a road bike. My motivation is more time spent in the saddle and the desire to cover more ground in less time.

Help convince me!
tntyz is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-16-08, 07:00 PM   #2
Bikewer
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2005
Bikes:
Posts: 1,441
Well, that's the old mantra; "If you want to go fast and far, get a roadster". However, be prepared to pay for a decent ride. Aluminum frames are light and cheap, but harsh. On a mountain bike you have cushy tires and suspension to soak up bumps. No such luxury on a roadster.
Steel is springy, but heavy at low price-points. Lightweight steel is....expensive.
Carbon fiber is great, but a little pricey.
Titanium is great....But a lot pricey.

Above all, make sure you get a ride that fits. If you're going to pop for a good ride, go somewhere where the shop will set it up for you and make sure it fits you well.
Bikewer is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-17-08, 03:35 AM   #3
Tony V
Tony V
 
Join Date: Oct 2007
Location: Sydney Australia
Bikes: Apollo Mountain bike
Posts: 98
I'm in the same situation as you.I've had a mountain bike for over eight years and now I'm thinking of getting a cross between a hybrid and a road bike.I have no interest in speed and my idea of cycling is fun and fitness.As the guy in the bike shop said that my rides won't be a comfortable,but it will be faster.As it is going to be a lighter bIke I wont be getting the work out that I want.
Tony V is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-17-08, 10:17 AM   #4
Tapeworm21
Senior Member
 
Tapeworm21's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2007
Location: Berkeley
Bikes: 2010 Tarmac SL, 2013 Fairdale Weekender, 2013 Fairdale Coaster, 1995 Specialized M2 Pro, 1972 Schwinn Heavy Duty, 2014 Surley Long Haul Trucker
Posts: 2,265
Cannondale Synapse.
Tapeworm21 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-17-08, 10:32 AM   #5
RonH
Life is good
 
RonH's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2001
Location: Not far from the Withlacoochee Trail. 🚴🏻
Bikes: My beloved 2001 Litespeed Tuscany and my 2014 Cannondale SuperSix EVO Hi-Mod
Posts: 15,939
Quote:
Originally Posted by tntyz View Post
Help convince me!
Read thru the threads in the Road Cycling forum. They will convince you.

What are your goals? Speed/faster rides? Weight loss? Endurance?
__________________


And Jesus looking upon them saith, "With men it is impossible, but not with God: for with God all things are possible." - Mark 10:27
RonH is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-17-08, 10:44 AM   #6
juggleaddict
Senior Member
 
juggleaddict's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2008
Location: Atlanta
Bikes: LHT
Posts: 866
don't be afraid of aluminum, i have a carbon wrapped seatpost and a carbon fork and it dampens it quite a bit, if you're riding on relatively decent roads, it's really not bad on aluminum, especially if your rides are less that 20 or so miles, if you hit a big bump, you're going to be out of the saddle to cushion the blow anyway.

i think it's worth it : ) i opted for a road bike over a motorbike, cheaper, and just about as fast in atlanta with the stop lights : ) i can keep up with traffic on my langster, even up hills

there is something to be said for comfort, but i'm still have a little durable kid stuff left, i haven't hit 20 yet!! a few more months. . .
juggleaddict is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-17-08, 02:28 PM   #7
joe_5700
CAT4
 
joe_5700's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2007
Location: Omaha, Nebraska
Bikes: 2009 Cervélo S1, 2009 Felt F75, 2010 Cannondale Synapse Carbon 5, 2011 Cannondale CAADx, 2011 Specialized Transition Elite
Posts: 1,680
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bikewer View Post
Aluminum frames are light and cheap, but harsh.
I too have a Trek Hybrid (7200). You might first want to try replacing those 700X35 tires with 700X28's. I did this on my 7200 and it made a big difference. I can cruise at least 1mph faster than before, BUT hill climbs feel about the same. I also recently bought a new Jamis Ventura Sport road bike. It's ride is definately harsher, but I can cruise even faster (up to 2 mph faster) than the 7200 with the 700X28's. Hills are much easier to climb. The ride is however much more harsh. I may be able to cover more distance on the Jamis more quickly, but it is definately at the cost of some comfort.
joe_5700 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-17-08, 04:09 PM   #8
alanbikehouston
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2004
Bikes:
Posts: 5,251
A typical 2008 road bike is simply a cheaper copy of a "pro" racing bike. They have an ultra-short wheelbase, which makes riding painful, and a low bar positions so folks can pretend that their trip to Starbucks is a time-trial. A well-made and properly fitted hybrid bike has a longer wheelbase, longer chainstays, and a higher bar position, making the hybrid FAR better for short (under 20 miles) rides in heavy urban traffic.

If you are riding in the inner city for ten miles, with red lights and stop signs every hundred yards, a good hybrid will be just as fast as a "road bike", but twice as comfortable, meaning you can ride twice as long and twice as far.
alanbikehouston is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-17-08, 04:53 PM   #9
tntyz
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
tntyz's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2008
Location: Nabob, WI
Bikes: '03 Trek 7500, '08 Madone 4.5
Posts: 1,176
Most of my riding is done on country roads in moderately hilly terrain. I've started to ride longer distances. By that I mean 50-60 miles rather than my previous 20-30 mile trips. I'd like to go longer distances, but not necessarily spend more time in the saddle. Sometimes I simply feel bogged down by wind resistance. Plus the sensation of going fast(er) has it's own appeal.

I like my Trek 7500 fine and I certainly don't "need" any more than what I have. My motivation for riding is exercise and just the fun of doing it. More just soliciting thoughts on why people ride roadies. What's the opinion of those who've switched; did it meet your expectations?
tntyz is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-17-08, 05:32 PM   #10
vaticdart
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2007
Location: Seattle, WA
Bikes: Giant OCR1
Posts: 435
I was on a Giant Cypress for about a year, and used it for 20 mile rides or less, and as a fair weather, daytime commuter.

Then I bought a Giant OCR1 and my whole attitude towards cycling changed. Over a year later and many thousands of dollars shelled out, I love it, and it has changed my life. I commute, I do 70 mile rides, I get around everywhere on it, have lights and full fenders, and am probably the healthiest I've ever been (and I grew up on a cattle ranch).
vaticdart is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-17-08, 05:58 PM   #11
Bikewer
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2005
Bikes:
Posts: 1,441
Do some research, and look at a variety of bikes. It's true that many roadsters come set up virtually the same as full-on racing bikes; fast-twitch frame geometry, short chainstays, steep head angles... All that.

But not all. You can still find "slack" roadsters with friendlier frame geometry. Look at touring bikes. If you have one in your area, go to a dedicated "roadie" shop. (Usually, they'll have TDF videos playing on the store's video and a bunch of very high-end frames hanging on the wall....)

My current ride is a very vintage 1970s "Cilo/Swiss" roadster. Columbus steel frame, Shimano 600 components, and a cushy, stable frame geometry.
Bikewer is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-17-08, 07:15 PM   #12
bkaapcke
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2005
Bikes:
Posts: 3,217
What's all the hurry about? If you get over that, no need for an expensive new ride. Most of the hurry in America is fake, anyway. bk
bkaapcke is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-18-08, 01:26 PM   #13
capejohn
Senior Member
 
capejohn's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2005
Location: Fairhaven, Massachusetts
Bikes: Novara Randonee, Felt Z45, Marin Belvedere Commuter
Posts: 1,789
I can't think of any downside to having two bikes. Enjoy the road bike.

SPANDEX UP!!!
capejohn is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-18-08, 01:44 PM   #14
Billy Bones
Senior Member
 
Billy Bones's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2008
Location: Shanghai, West Virginia
Bikes:
Posts: 501
Hybrid is a mule, road bike a stallion. Are you a muleteer or a horseman?
Billy Bones is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-18-08, 01:55 PM   #15
chipcom 
Infamous Member
 
chipcom's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2005
Location: Ohio
Bikes: Surly Big Dummy, Fuji World, 80ish Bianchi
Posts: 24,366
Quote:
Originally Posted by tntyz View Post
Most of my riding is done on country roads in moderately hilly terrain. I've started to ride longer distances. By that I mean 50-60 miles rather than my previous 20-30 mile trips. I'd like to go longer distances, but not necessarily spend more time in the saddle. Sometimes I simply feel bogged down by wind resistance. Plus the sensation of going fast(er) has it's own appeal.

I like my Trek 7500 fine and I certainly don't "need" any more than what I have. My motivation for riding is exercise and just the fun of doing it. More just soliciting thoughts on why people ride roadies. What's the opinion of those who've switched; did it meet your expectations?
A 'road' bike is lighter, more nimble, more twitchy and offers a more aero riding position, which will give you the 'sensation' of going faster, and might even actually let you go a little faster, especially on climbs. It does not have to be uncomfortable, even if Alan likes perpetuating that old myth. Stem angle and length can be adjusted for a more upright riding position, wider tires can be used for a smoother ride, etc. You can also experiment with different frame materials and geometries...I prefer classic steel frames with traditional geometries, you may prefer something totally different.

The bottom line is to get what is comfortable and fun for you, go out and test ride as many bikes as you can before making a purchase, if for no other reason than to figure out what type of bike, components, geometry, etc. trips your trigger, if not to pick something off-the-shelf.
__________________
"Let us hope our weapons are never needed --but do not forget what the common people knew when they demanded the Bill of Rights: An armed citizenry is the first defense, the best defense, and the final defense against tyranny. If guns are outlawed, only the government will have guns. Only the police, the secret police, the military, the hired servants of our rulers. Only the government -- and a few outlaws. I intend to be among the outlaws" - Edward Abbey
chipcom is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off



All times are GMT -6. The time now is 02:45 PM.