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-   -   do you feel like a piece of crap if you are inactive for a day or so? (http://www.bikeforums.net/general-cycling-discussion/471291-do-you-feel-like-piece-crap-if-you-inactive-day-so.html)

Lebowski 09-29-08 10:08 AM

do you feel like a piece of crap if you are inactive for a day or so?
 
one thing i've noticed since i started biking is that if i don't get out and do something physical i feel sluggish and crappy. i'm like a fiend for movement.

this makes me wonder how bad people with sedentary life styles feel. or are they just used to it?

127.0.0.1 09-29-08 10:12 AM

physically ok mentally crap

sedentary people will never know...they need to push through a pain barrier to reach our plane

Buglady 09-29-08 10:16 AM

I feel sluggish both physically and mentally if I don't get out and move every day. A 20-minute walk will hold me for a day or two, but I have to get out on the bike for at least an hour three times a week or I start to get really cranky!

Billy Bones 09-29-08 10:25 AM

WE'RE the ones with the endorphin addiction.

Quote:

Originally Posted by Lebowski (Post 7567735)
. . .how bad people with sedentary life styles feel. . . .

I suspect we project onto "ordinary" people all those perceptions we would have were we to experience enforced inactivity. As a day-to-day matter, I'm pretty sure they don't associate any of their physical body perceptions with inactivity.

MailMover 09-29-08 10:35 AM

As Dr. Phil would say, "That would be a yes!" People around me can tell when I haven't been riding..... hence, no one has been by to see me that often (not too many friends yet, since I moved back home) since I crashed and broke my leg last month, and I am slowing going stir crazy...:notamused:

jgt_madone_newb 09-29-08 10:35 AM

As a former very sedentary person, I've seen both sides of this issue. Looking back, it seems to me that, in my case anyway, it seems like you slowly and gradually get fatter and lazier and more lethargic, and tired and achy, and cranky, and a lot of other really negative things, and it isn't until you've made some huge changes that you really understand just how crappy you felt before.

I honestly don't know what exactly made me finally wake up and see the light, but I was 45 years old, 5'-9", had managed to blossom up to 274 pounds. I have a solid family history of heart diseases and diabetes, and I was well on my way to a masive coronary event. Luckily, something made me decide I really had to fix myself, and I joined a gym, got a trainer, and completely changed my entire lifestyle. I eat comepletely differently, and I go absolutely nuts if I find myself having to go more than two days without at least an hour of solid exercise. Last week, I ran my first 10K, and next year's goal is to ride my bike across Iowa.

It was a tough lesson, but now I've got the greatest motivator ever - I simply just don't want to ever feel that way again.

smessvader 09-29-08 10:44 AM

I totally agree -- I am at the point where I cycle every day or every other day, and usually do some light weights at home on the days I don't ride. Last week, I had to take my bike in for repairs and didn't ride it for two days in a row -- I swear I was getting pretty antsy. I didn't realize how addicted I was! (Of course, it's a GREAT addiction to have.)

Lebowski 09-29-08 11:26 AM

i agree the endorphins are pretty awesome. its like drugs, but free and good for you.

and i do feel cranky and sorta depressed if i dont get my fix.

im jonesin for some wind in my face time to ride :D bye

caloso 09-29-08 11:30 AM

For the past couple of years, I've ridden nearly every day, rain or shine. Being a stubborn bike commuter has a lot to do with that, but really I just like riding my bike. And the same bike that was an infernal torture device on Saturday afternoon can be a therapeutic healer on Sunday morning. You get out of it what you put into it.

DataJunkie 09-29-08 11:42 AM

Count me as a yes.
I have been having issues with an internal problem and not riding nearly as much. Turns out that I feel better on a bike. Anyhow, I get cranky and my wife requires that I ride to alleviate said crankiness.

tortoise 09-29-08 11:59 AM

Nope.

-Love to ride, hit the gym hard three days a week, active with the dog every day.

But putting my feet up and doing absolutely nothing feels pretty all right too. :)

Buglady 09-29-08 12:08 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by jgt_madone_newb (Post 7567938)
As a former very sedentary person, I've seen both sides of this issue. Looking back, it seems to me that, in my case anyway, it seems like you slowly and gradually get fatter and lazier and more lethargic, and tired and achy, and cranky, and a lot of other really negative things, and it isn't until you've made some huge changes that you really understand just how crappy you felt before.

Definitely agree here. I was underweight rather than over, but I was certainly no healthier than my larger friends, no matter what my doctor said (I've changed docs - that one put me on a scale after I had started biking and SCOLDED me for gaining 5 pounds. That was 5 pounds of MUSCLE!).

I hadn't done any physical exercise other than walking in ten years, and I was constantly tired, achy, cranky, incredibly anxious, fearful, and gradually becoming less and less able to leave my house. When I got my first bike, I only ventured a few blocks, but even that was enough for me to feel more powerful and made me want to do more.

Three years after that first round-the-neighbourhood bike ride, I ride ~60 km a week for commuting/errands, and I try to do a longer ride every weekend (usually 50-70 km). This month I did my first (real) century ride, and it won't be my last by any means. I've also gained thirty pounds (primarily muscle, but the hollows under my collarbones are gone and my ribs don't stick out when I wear a bikini) because I can eat without freaking out, and I haven't had a cold in two years.

I think that for women the sense of having physical power and strength is particularly important - it's not something most women of my generation grew up with. We were trained to see sports as something boys did, and exercise as something we should do to keep our bodies in a particular shape, not as something pleasurable in itself. We were taught to look at our bodies from the outside to make sure we looked right, not to experience our own physicality and the sheer fun of moving. Luckily that seems to be changing - my Pathfinder group (all 12-13 year old girls) are happily rambunctious and they don't see any reason why they should not play hockey with the boys (and win, usually! There are some pretty talented athletes in this group).

tfg111 09-29-08 12:13 PM

There is an article in the new Bicycling mag about this very topic. I feel bad when I try to have a rest day. I am also a insulin dependent diabetic and rest days are very hard on blood sugars. They are all over the place so that make me feel worse.

Gonzlobo 09-29-08 12:36 PM

I ride Mon/Wed & Fri. When I get back on the bike Monday morning, it's usually my worst trip of the week. Perhaps it's just Monday, perhaps it's crap.

GTALuigi 09-29-08 01:29 PM

what can i say, i'm addicted to bike commute now.

weekends when i'm not doing anything, i feel like ... not moving.

i constantly find excuses to hop on the bike, and fetch groceries, or whatever i need :p

Jim from Boston 09-29-08 02:14 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Lebowski (Post 7567735)
one thing i've noticed since i started biking is that if i don't get out and do something physical i feel sluggish and crappy. i'm like a fiend for movement.

this makes me wonder how bad people with sedentary life styles feel. or are they just used to it?

I certainly agree. I've been off the bike for four days now due to rain and have only done one long ride in the past four weeks; I'm pretty listless today.

I find a really difficult time for me is when I go to educational conferences in my profession. They always involve sitting for extended periods all day long, as well as protracted sitting during traveling to and from the conference. I always bring or rent a bike to ride in the morning, but there is neevr enough time to compensate for the prolonged inactivity. I usually go to about two a year, but by a fluke, I'm planning on three in October (groan).

Fremdchen 09-29-08 09:58 PM

That endorphin hit is truly addictive. Last weekend I went on a pretty strenuous ride in the morning, and that afternoon, legs still wasted, I saw some people riding while I was a car passenger and had a damn strong urge to go ride some more. On the other hand, I've really upped (doubled!) my riding lately and took Sunday as a rest day. My body's glad I took the day off.

I'm formerly sedentary also. Sedentary people tend to associate exercise with physical discomfort, pain, and often embarassment. Exercise is perceived as an ordeal to endure. If you've been sedentary all your life, you tend to accept the lethargy and ever diminishing physical capabilities as just a part of life and the aging process.

Chris L 09-30-08 02:51 AM

Absolutely. I just had five days off the bike after having three wisdom teeth* removed -- my longest lay off since 1997. To say I felt terrible would be an understatement. The first commute on day 6 left me tired, but feeling better than I had the whole time I was off the bike.

* Wisdom teeth is, as we all know, an ironic name. What can possibly be wise about teeth that are never used, don't grow straight, and have a root that runs deeper in the gum than any other teeth, making them the most problematic to remove?

making 09-30-08 02:56 AM

I am kinda worried about not riding this winter. I do get grouchy.

Big_e 09-30-08 03:00 PM

It's the reverse with me. I don't ride if I feel like crap. I'll stay home or drive in feeling perfectly justified that I'm doing the right thing for my body.
Ernest

AdrianFly 10-02-08 09:10 AM

Must ride every day unless it's a recovery day. If it's a recovery day then must sit inside and watch a few episodes of Family Guy. This formula makes for an extremely well rounded life.

G piny parnas 10-02-08 12:56 PM

I ride 25-30 miles a day for work-- Im not cute in any way-- not skinny-- not fat--
I ride a 52-18 single speed front brake--- I am angry with drivers-- cell phones and such
I could care less how somebodyis concerned about loosing weight on a bike--
get on the thing and ride--- I do it to pay rent and bills--- I love it. I build my own rides
and i scream and yell at traffic-- been shot at -- had water bottles thrown at me and batteries--
it gets me off.... I drink Makers Mark and smoke Lucky Strike........ Hi.

fluidworks 10-02-08 01:03 PM

I have a recovery day at least once every other week where I do nothing. I usually go as far as between my sofa and computer chair. I figure it's good to completely relax every once in a while. But other than that, I ride every day.

IronMac 10-03-08 04:13 AM

A day or two? Try three months! I've been off my bike ever since fracturing my right wrist on July 6th!

wabbit 10-03-08 08:22 AM

yes. if i don't get enough physical activity, bike or otherwise, then i feel gross, sluggish, shlubby you name it. This summer we had really sh&tty weather and it was hard to get out for enough rides, and i had that feeling a LOT. Now the season is just about over, so it's the gym and running.


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