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Old 11-08-08, 03:14 PM   #1
screwdriver
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Rear hub measurement

Are all Schwinn bicycle rear hubs the same length? The frame of my Schwinn Traveler measures 5"(127mm) between the flat portions where the hub mounts. I'm sure that dimention changes a bit when the hub is mounted and tightened. What is the metric measurement for the correct rear hub, is it 120mm?
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Old 11-08-08, 03:30 PM   #2
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They're not all the same. It depends on the type of bike and number of rear cogs.

120mm would be a common dropout spacing for a bike with 5 or 6 rear cogs.
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Old 11-09-08, 12:00 AM   #3
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Originally Posted by screwdriver View Post
Are all Schwinn bicycle rear hubs the same length? The frame of my Schwinn Traveler measures 5"(127mm) between the flat portions where the hub mounts. I'm sure that dimention changes a bit when the hub is mounted and tightened. What is the metric measurement for the correct rear hub, is it 120mm?
Up until the '80's, it would have been 120mm. It might have gotten sprung at some point to put in a more modern wheel or maybe it just got bent. It's no big deal- just put the wheel in and ride it.
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Old 11-09-08, 06:15 PM   #4
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Up until the '80's, it would have been 120mm. It might have gotten sprung at some point to put in a more modern wheel or maybe it just got bent. It's no big deal- just put the wheel in and ride it.
The reason for my question is, I have a 1974 Schwinn LE TOUR frameset and I want to build it back as a 10 speed if that's possible.
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Old 11-10-08, 03:23 AM   #5
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120 is an old spacing.
126 was common for 7 speeds.
130 or 135 > 7 speeds, with MB's being 135 and road bikes 130.

Just build your wheel with 130MM "road" spacing and stuff it in the drop outs. They'll spring a few MM without problem.
I think "technically", you may have to redish the wheel a couple MM's, but in reality, probably not.
I've stuffed 130 into my 126 RockHopper and can't see that the wheel ISN'T centered. I did use a mishmash of parts though, so maybe it just happened to "work out"?.
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Old 11-10-08, 07:12 PM   #6
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The reason for my question is, I have a 1974 Schwinn LE TOUR frameset and I want to build it back as a 10 speed if that's possible.
Sure- why wouldn't it? 5-speed freewheels are still available:
http://www.bikepartsusa.com/bikeparts/item/01-78343/
http://sheldonbrown.com/harris/freewheels.html#5
and wheels built with threaded hubs (not cassette) are available through any good bike shop.

In fact, if the wheel is built to the now-standard 130mm width, a 5-speed freewheel allows the wheel to have almost no dish, which would be quite strong. This would be the way I'd build the bike.

The Schwinn Le Tour frames were made from high-tensile steel. They're easy to realign to fit any hub you like, from 110mm width BMX hubs to 135mm width mountain bike hubs.

(FWIW: my first 10-speed was a 1979 Schwinn Le Tour III. Darn I miss that bike.)
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