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-   -   Smallest Pump to fit in saddlebag for races? (http://www.bikeforums.net/general-cycling-discussion/487132-smallest-pump-fit-saddlebag-races.html)

caelric 11-17-08 10:22 AM

Smallest Pump to fit in saddlebag for races?
 
I am looking for the smallest possible pump that is still usable to fit in a small size saddlebag for my tri bike. The only things that are going in my saddlebag are a topeak mini tool, a spare tube, a small set of patches and glue, and a mini pump. Trying to keep the size and weight down, but tris are self supporting, so no outside help.

Any ideas?

Little Darwin 11-17-08 10:32 AM

Have you considered searching the Triathlon forum to see what other people in your same situation prefer?

I don't race, but I use a road morph because I don't want to fiddle with anything that isn't usable when I need to inflate a tire, but it is too big to fit in a seat pack and is mounted to my frame. For a racer, I would think that a good CO2 system would be best... but that is just a guess.

caelric 11-17-08 10:39 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Little Darwin (Post 7865732)
Have you considered searching the Triathlon forum to see what other people in your same situation prefer?

I don't race, but I use a road morph because I don't want to fiddle with anything that isn't usable when I need to inflate a tire, but it is too big to fit in a seat pack and is mounted to my frame. For a racer, I would think that a good CO2 system would be best... but that is just a guess.

I did search the tri forum (and slowtwitch, as well), and the only thing I really found was that some carry tubes , and some don't, and that those that do usually carry CO2, but some carry a pump. No recommendations, however.

I'm kind of against CO2, b/c of the single use factor, I would rather have a pump which can be used many times. I do realize the smaller a pump is, the harder to use it will be.

nowheels 11-17-08 10:44 AM

I got a small crank brothers that I fit into one of my saddle bags... just a smidge larger than a CO2 pump

Little Darwin 11-17-08 12:11 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by caelric (Post 7865790)
I'm kind of against CO2, b/c of the single use factor, I would rather have a pump which can be used many times. I do realize the smaller a pump is, the harder to use it will be.

So, you have a conscience too...

I personally would still consider the CO2 for the race, and something like a Road Morph for training rides. Count on the CO2 never being used, as is the case for most emergency items, and the road morph for training when you aren't as worried about weight etc, and it will make it much easier to pump up any flats.

My immediate thought is that a very small "race day" pump is only going to be used a handful of times in your lifetime anyway, so it is not that much more reusable than a CO2 cartridge, but I understand the sentiment. More food for thought, if you are racing, you will be giving up precious seconds any time you have to use the pump compared to a CO2 cartridge.

mp123 11-17-08 12:26 PM

If the clock is running I don't know why you'd want to mess with a mini-pump. Once you try CO2 you'll never go back. It's 1 second of wooossshhh vs. 10 minutes of pumping, sweating, cursing, breaking the valve, etc.

A mini pump makes good backup but probably not too usefull in a race.

But to answer your question, I have both the Road Morph and the Crank Bros pump. The Road Morph works pretty well for a mini but is too big for a seat bag. The Crank Bros. is smaller but the head is pretty fussy and it's really hard to go much over 80 psi or so. Both fit pretty well on the frame though and the Crank Bros fits well in a jersey.

cachehiker 11-17-08 12:56 PM

I generally carry both CO2 and a Barbieri Carb One that weighs something like 68g. I leave the pump in the truck on race day though. Out on the road, I get razzed if I take longer than 10 minutes to fix a flat so the first gets CO2. The pump and patches are for the rest. Fortunately, I've suffered more than one flat on a road ride just once in the last few years.

That tiny little ultralight pump is nice to have as a backup but it has only been used a few times because IT'S A MAJOR PITA! It works but I swear it would take me longer to pump up the tire than it would to just ditch the bike and run the rest of the bike leg!

roadfix 11-17-08 01:26 PM

You are going to rely on a useless mini-pump during a race? Carry the CO2 when you're out racing. Most all mini-pumps out there are junk.

caelric 11-17-08 02:35 PM

Races are kind of a misnomer, since yes, they are races, but I am not winning my age group or anything, so a couple of extra minutes with a pump won't kill me. Besides, for the real racers in a tri, at least the shorter distances tris, if you get a flat, you lose, no matter how fast you change the tube.

Thanks for the food for thought, I am leaning towards the CO2 at this point, based on the arguements.

sharkey00 11-17-08 02:54 PM

This is about as small as it gets, Link . OR for a weight cost of 170 grams you could get something that will inflate a tire in less than 40 minutes and leave your valve stems intact.... Road Morph

roadfix 11-17-08 02:58 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by caelric (Post 7867343)
...so a couple of extra minutes with a pump won't kill me.

Well, that statement would hold true if you're talking about a full sized frame pump or a road morph, and not a tiny mini-pump that fits in your seat bag. :)

mp123 11-17-08 03:02 PM

Actually, the smallest CO2 inflator is http://www.genuineinnovations.com/bi...px?prodid=1000 as far as I know. Works great too but you do need to use threaded cartridges.

i86o 11-17-08 05:17 PM

why patches and a spare tube? how many flats do you plan on encountering? or rather not plan to i suppose but i cant see you getting more than one in a race, and, having the time to find and patch them if they are encountered

just ride it getaway style? ;)

Robert Foster 11-18-08 12:07 AM

If you are racing and it is a long enough race to change a flat nothing would be lighter or quicker than a CO-2 system. They will pump up a 700c tire in seconds and inflate to 120 LBS. That or a support crew with spare rims and tires.

orbeamike 11-18-08 12:36 AM

Vittoria Pit stop
 
CO2 and sealant all in one shot. Don't even worry about changing the tube. If you have a flat, stop pump and go in 30 seconds.

mechBgon 11-18-08 01:14 AM

I have the aluminum version of the Micro Rocket, plus the AirChuck SL CO2. If I have a flat, the pump is just along as the final bail-out option if/when I run out of CO2 cartridges, because the pump is small and thus slow. But it is small enough to fit in my seatbag.

rbrian 11-18-08 08:32 AM

Is there a reason you can't use a frame or bottlecage mount pump in a race? Why does it have to fit in you seat pack?

dynaryder 11-18-08 10:36 AM

For commuting I carry a Topeak MiniMorph:
http://www.topeak.com/products/Mini-Pumps/MiniMorph

Pretty small,but still does the job. Haven't had to use it on high psi tires,but it'll do 26x2.1's no prob. Only downside is no psi gauge like the Road and Mountain.

stapfam 11-19-08 03:47 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by dynaryder (Post 7872647)
For commuting I carry a Topeak MiniMorph:
http://www.topeak.com/products/Mini-Pumps/MiniMorph

Pretty small,but still does the job. Haven't had to use it on high psi tires,but it'll do 26x2.1's no prob. Only downside is no psi gauge like the Road and Mountain.

I use the mini morph and it works to 120 psi. Still too large for a wedge though but dead easy to fit in the frame. But the mini Morph does take time to pump up to pressure. Far better would be the road morph and that is still light.

And the lightest, smallest and quickest would be CO2- But I don't like them either.

miahmiah 11-19-08 04:20 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Robert Foster (Post 7870810)
If you are racing and it is a long enough race to change a flat nothing would be lighter or quicker than a CO-2 system. They will pump up a 700c tire in seconds and inflate to 120 LBS. That or a support crew with spare rims and tires.

I've never heard of CO2 being able to inflate beyond 70psi or so... are you serious about the 120 thing? Different carts or device? Two applications?

mp123 11-19-08 09:48 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by miahmiah (Post 7878284)
I've never heard of CO2 being able to inflate beyond 70psi or so... are you serious about the 120 thing? Different carts or device? Two applications?

Depends on the tire. A big fat MTB tire has a much larger volume of air in it so you might only get 50-60 psi out of a cartridge. The same cartridge would fill a low volume road tube to 120 easily. A 16 gram CO2 fills my 700x23 tires to 120-125 psi. I haven't tried a 12 gram cartridge but it might only go to 80 or so.


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