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  1. #1
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    How do you know how many RPMs you are turning?

    I have seen a few posts where rpms are talked about. How do you know how many times you are spinning? I am assuming you are talking about the pedals. Please clear this up for me. Thanks.
    2003 Bianchi Denali

  2. #2
    OregonBound
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    Well, you can purchase a cycle computer that has a cadence feature and then carefully mount the cadence sensor near the crank. Be sure you have calibrated it correctly. Check the read out.

    On the other hand, you could count the number of times your turn the pedals for six seconds and multiply by 10.

    Paul

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    Career Cyclist threadend's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by OregonBound
    Well, you can purchase a cycle computer that has a cadence feature and then carefully mount the cadence sensor near the crank. Be sure you have calibrated it correctly. Check the read out.

    On the other hand, you could count the number of times your turn the pedals for six seconds and multiply by 10.

    Paul
    These ways both work fine. The computers with cadence are the easiest because you get continuous realtime information. Personally I like the Cateye Astrale w/ cadence. Yeah, initial installation is a bit more involved than a standard cyclecomputer, but not overwhelming for the average mechanically inclined. Not comfortable with the install, buy from the LBS and I'll bet install is free.

    I'm not sure about other brands / makes, but the Astrale requires no calibration for the cadence feature, it's a 1:1 ratio.
    2003 Iceman Challenge - 2:34:55 - 897 / 2,000*
    2002 Iceman Challenge - 2:39:23 - 1093 / 2,186
    2000 Iceman Challenge - 2:49:18 - 1516 / 2,153
    *estimated

  4. #4
    Senior Member DieselDan's Avatar
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    You could count your cadence for 10 seconds and multiply by 6.
    Bikes use brakes to stop.

    If your bike has breaks, don't ride it.

  5. #5
    abc
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    Or you can count for 1 second and multiply by 60

    That's what I do - just make sure that I'm doing slightly more than 1 revolution per second giving me about 70-80 rpm. Only takes a second to calculate your current rpm.

  6. #6
    2-Cyl, 1/2 HP @ 90 RPM slvoid's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by abc
    Or you can count for 1 second and multiply by 60

    That's what I do - just make sure that I'm doing slightly more than 1 revolution per second giving me about 70-80 rpm. Only takes a second to calculate your current rpm.
    I think you'll have to obey your standard nyquist sampling theorem there

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    Cool. Thanks. I guess counting how many times you are spinning in 10 seconds would work really well. Why do I over-complicate things so much?
    2003 Bianchi Denali

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    Around now and then DnvrFox's Avatar
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    Strangely, I use my cyclocomputer "seconds" feature and count for a whole minute. That way I don't have to use higher math and multiply by 10. Really! <g>
    DnvrFox - still bicycling, swimming, walking and weight lifting at 74yo is participating a bit in BFN 50+.

  9. #9
    Senior Member DieselDan's Avatar
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    You could just ride your bike without worry.
    Bikes use brakes to stop.

    If your bike has breaks, don't ride it.

  10. #10
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    I don't worry. I was just curious.
    2003 Bianchi Denali

  11. #11
    Senior Member 55/Rad's Avatar
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    I do it by sound - I have a playing card clothes-pinned to my spokes. I then count the piston strokes.

    And, I look at my Cateye Astrale 8 with the cadence feature.

    55/Rad

  12. #12
    Senior Member Don Cook's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by tabby
    I have seen a few posts where rpms are talked about. How do you know how many times you are spinning? I am assuming you are talking about the pedals. Please clear this up for me. Thanks.
    I've posted this file before. It should answer your questions about determing cadence or crankshaft rpm.

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