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Old 12-10-08, 06:26 PM   #1
yrrej
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Stupid Trainer Tricks To Avoid?

Hi,

I found a good deal on the Kurt Kinetic Road Machine...

UPS claims that it will arrive tomorrow

I have only been biking for about a month after a
decades long dry spell...

Are there things that one should *not* do whilst
on the trainer?

Is off the saddle pedaling OK? ( After about 15 minutes
on the road it is difficult for me to stand and attack even
small hills...)

I currently plan on having a small two step kitchen ladder
nearby to do the mount.

Would it be safe to stand on a pedal to do the mount?

Any other tips, suggestions?

(The LBS said a trainer wheel/tire would run over a
hundred dollars...)

Jerry
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Old 12-10-08, 07:04 PM   #2
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It's probably kind of a stress, but I used a pedal all the time. Trackstands are no problem, however.
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Old 12-10-08, 07:59 PM   #3
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I stand on a pedal.

Ride it like you stole it.

Repeat nightly.
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Old 12-10-08, 08:31 PM   #4
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Quote:
Originally Posted by yrrej View Post
Is off the saddle pedaling OK? ( After about 15 minutes
on the road it is difficult for me to stand and attack even
small hills...)
Yes.


Quote:
Originally Posted by yrrej View Post
I currently plan on having a small two step kitchen ladder
nearby to do the mount.

Would it be safe to stand on a pedal to do the mount?
Do you use a ladder to get on your bicycle outside?


Quote:
Originally Posted by yrrej View Post
(The LBS said a trainer wheel/tire would run over a
hundred dollars...)

The LBS is trying to make some money. If you feel like supporting your LBS and shelling out money to them, go ahead. Otherwise pick up a $15 Conti Ultra Sport. You don't need a trainer specific wheel, and you don't need a trainer specific tire.
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Old 12-10-08, 08:52 PM   #5
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Tips:
- Get a big fan
- Have something to occupy your mind like a TV or iPod
- Don't give up too soon. It takes a few weeks of consistent use to learn to "enjoy" the trainer
- Build up gradually. 15 minutes the first time you use it should be fine.
- Have a good towel handy
- Protect the vulnerable components. Headsets and the bolt at the top of the steerer tube tend to corrode quickly due to sweat.
- Use the skewer that comes with the trainer. They tend to fit more snuggly which helps minimize the wobbles.
- Use your HRM. If you don't have one, buy one. It's a good tool for monitoring your intervals.

By the way, I used to use a ladder to mount my bike when it was on rollers, but I don't think you need to do that with a trainer since the bike is held firmly in place.
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Old 12-10-08, 09:03 PM   #6
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you'll get hot when riding and sweat a lot. it is better and more comfortable to wear a performance shirt than it is to go bare-backed. the sweat dripping down your back, chest, and sides is kinda uncomfortable.

you can get on like you would a normal bike - that's how i get on.

if you're going to train for an hour, get enough water for that hour.

i like downloading documentaries and other like-shows and watching them on my laptop when i get on the trainer.

i also get on the trainer in the winter when i stop riding on the roads. i just grind my old rubber down and get a fresh pair in the spring.
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Old 12-10-08, 09:45 PM   #7
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Quote:
Originally Posted by machka View Post

do you use a ladder to get on your bicycle outside?
+1
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Old 12-10-08, 09:52 PM   #8
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Machka View Post
Do you use a ladder to get on your bicycle outside?





The LBS is trying to make some money. If you feel like supporting your LBS and shelling out money to them, go ahead. Otherwise pick up a $15 Conti Ultra Sport. You don't need a trainer specific wheel, and you don't need a trainer specific tire.
Perhaps I should think about the ladder I have to tilt the bike a good bit to
get my leg over the saddle....

I tried standing on the near sided pedal to mount until the time my leg did not
clear the saddle...It was sort of awkward, the bike was rolling down the hill,
I had one foot in the toe-clip and other was straddling the tire, a close fit...

I want to ride the bike during the winter when weather permits so swapping
the tire on the wheel is not really an option...

Jerry
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Old 12-11-08, 09:30 AM   #9
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I have a tall bike and the trainer adds a few inches of height. With the clipless pedals, I feel better stepping up onto something to get on my bike when its on the trainer, I use two milk crates (one on each side).

Keep water, a towel, a phone, and a remote control (you'll need entertainment) close at hand. A fan is extremely useful. I don't move my butt on the seat as much when on a trainer so I have to remind myself to do this from time to time.

I keep old tires to use on my rear wheel when I'm going to put my bike on a trainer as it will use up tread.
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Old 12-11-08, 11:42 AM   #10
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if you have trouble getting on the bike, perhaps it's too big for you? assuming normal flexibility, you shouldn't have too much trouble mounting the bike on the flat ground. on the trainer you raise it a few inches, sure, but you can still step up on the pedal and swing the other leg over.
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Old 12-11-08, 01:19 PM   #11
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Quote:
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if you have trouble getting on the bike, perhaps it's too big for you? assuming normal flexibility, you shouldn't have too much trouble mounting the bike on the flat ground. on the trainer you raise it a few inches, sure, but you can still step up on the pedal and swing the other leg over.
I don't think the bike is too big...being seventy years old might have some
impact on my flexibility ( and 200 pounds)

Jerry
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Old 12-11-08, 01:52 PM   #12
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Some trainer questions

All right!

The trainer came late this morning. I put the rascal together and
then it was time to fix lunch...

After lunch settled I pumped up the tires and attached the bike to the Kurt Kinetic as carefully
as I could...

I adjusted the pressure wheel so I could manually pull and push the wheel
a quarter turn with no slippage and climbed on...

I was a little surprised at the lack of resistance and had to move to the
highest gear ratio ( I have a Specialized Sequoia Comp with a 10 gear cassette
and 3 gear chainring) to get a reasonable feeling of pressure while pedaling.

One of the reasons I got the trainer was to strengthen my standing ability
which is currently very weak.

I don't think the trainer offers enough resistance to do much standing...

Following the advice earlier in this thread I only 'rode' for about 20 minutes
(but managed to work up a sweat.)

After I dismounted I noticed that I could now cause the tire to
slip with a quick manual quarter turn, back and forth.

Some questions:
1) How do you determine the optimal pressure to apply to the back tire when mounting the bike?
2) Any suggestions on how to use the trainer for strengthening the 'standing' muscles?
3) I currently have a wireless simple bike computer that uses the front wheel. It seems
clear that I probably want something that works off of the back wheel. What are some
options ie is wireless possible or is there a quick disconnect wired computer I can
use when the bike is 'on the rack'?

Thanks,

Jerry
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Old 12-11-08, 02:24 PM   #13
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Tighten the roller against the wheel to increase resistance. I sort of remember someone telling me to screw it in for 3 complete turns after it first touches the wheel, so that's usually what I do. And make sure you have enough pressure in your tires.

I don't think that my computer is very accurate on the trainer. I probably have the resistance set wrong or something (so maybe the 1080 degrees thing is wrong), but the way mine is set, 12mph feels like 20mph. I have a Cateye Strada Cadence...not wireless, but more than long enough to reach the rear wheel. The cadence is nice to keep me from slacking off. I usually hook up a heart rate monitor too.
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Old 12-11-08, 03:17 PM   #14
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I have an old trainer that has variable resistance with a cable control that mounts on the handlebar to control th amount of resistance while on the bike. I thought that most trainers have some sort of variable resistance adjustment. Mine is an Action Pac made in the USA!
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Old 12-11-08, 03:31 PM   #15
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my trainer has a flywheel, and i think yours would too. to make sure the resistance is good, i put my pedal arm at 3 o'clock, and hold onto the flywheel. i then push down on the pedal hard. if the tire doesn't slip on the roller, then it's all good.

for the "standing muscles" issue:
try working on your core muscles, particularly your obliques. when you stand up and start cranking out HUGE power, your arms + core will give before your legs do. when you push down with your right leg you'll push the right side of your body up. you have to counter this with your core and arm muscles. to strengthen the obliques, you can do situps, lateral situps, or stick twists (if you have access to a reverse-incline bench). I recommend stick twists, but if you don't have access to the bench, you can't do 'em.
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Old 12-11-08, 04:21 PM   #16
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Thanks for the hints folks...

One last question for the day...

The trainer holds the bike (Specialized Sequoia Comp) nice and tight using
the original bikes skewer.

Is there any compelling reason to use the skewer that came with
the Kurt Kinetic?

Thanks,

Jerry
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Old 12-11-08, 04:41 PM   #17
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don't worry about it. you don't need to fix anything if it's going alright. i use the skewer that's on my bike vs. the one that came with the trainer.
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Old 12-11-08, 08:20 PM   #18
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Quote:
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Perhaps I should think about the ladder I have to tilt the bike a good bit to
get my leg over the saddle....
You don't have to get your leg over the saddle to get on the bicycle ... just step over the top tube.
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Old 12-11-08, 10:51 PM   #19
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Quote:
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You don't have to get your leg over the saddle to get on the bicycle ... just step over the top tube.
Whoa! You must be more flexible than you think. I think my only bike I could possibly mount that way is my BMX. I always swing my leg over the saddle/rear tire. Much less flexibility necessary.
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Old 12-11-08, 11:49 PM   #20
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Whoa! You must be more flexible than you think. I think my only bike I could possibly mount that way is my BMX. I always swing my leg over the saddle/rear tire. Much less flexibility necessary.
Aparently some of us are more flexible than the others, because I can do the foot over the top tube thing as well. Admittedly I've almost fallen on my face a couple of times while doing this. If your foot doesn't clear the top tube and your center of gravity is already on the other side of the bike, there's no chance of recovery.
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Old 12-11-08, 11:57 PM   #21
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Whoa! You must be more flexible than you think. I think my only bike I could possibly mount that way is my BMX. I always swing my leg over the saddle/rear tire. Much less flexibility necessary.
My hamstrings have all the flexibility of 2x4s. When I told my chiropractor I wasn't very flexible, he nodded and smiled, and then put me through some flexibility tests ... and could hardly believe how inflexible I was. He told me he has never come across someone with as little hamstring flexibility as I have. And that's not the first time I've heard that.

And yet I find stepping over the top tube so much easier than trying to get my leg WAY up over a saddle.
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Old 12-12-08, 02:03 AM   #22
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Oh, position your left pedal at about 3 o'clock, crunch down on the rear brake lever, and climb on. If you still need a ladder or step stool, by all means use it. I hate trainers, by the way. I may have mentioned this before.

I don't laugh at the ladder. I used one for a month after an injury. What a joy to graduate to curbs. Getting on and off unassisted was frightning, by the way.
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Old 12-12-08, 06:30 AM   #23
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My hamstrings have all the flexibility of 2x4s. When I told my chiropractor I wasn't very flexible, he nodded and smiled, and then put me through some flexibility tests ... and could hardly believe how inflexible I was. He told me he has never come across someone with as little hamstring flexibility as I have. And that's not the first time I've heard that.

And yet I find stepping over the top tube so much easier than trying to get my leg WAY up over a saddle.
How do you get your leg to go over the top tube without going over the saddle first? My top tube is more than three feet off the ground, I can't just stand and lift one foot three feet and the top tube is even higher when the bike is on the trainer. I think your a lot more flexible than I am.
I have to tilt my bike to the side a bit to get on but I can't do that when its on a trainer. I also can't clip into one of my pedals then step up on that pedal and throw my leg over as my foot would have to be turned at an extreme angle to clip in or I'd have to be standing on the leg of trainer itself.
I find it easier to have a couple of milk crates to step onto.
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Old 12-12-08, 06:31 AM   #24
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The KK should have more than enough resistance to jack you up......you must not have it tight enough.

Tighten it to the point where it won't slip then go a couple turns past that.

It won't be like climbing mountains but unless you're a cycling god...something isn't set up right.
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Old 12-12-08, 10:16 AM   #25
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Quote:
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My hamstrings have all the flexibility of 2x4s. When I told my chiropractor I wasn't very flexible, he nodded and smiled, and then put me through some flexibility tests ... and could hardly believe how inflexible I was. He told me he has never come across someone with as little hamstring flexibility as I have. And that's not the first time I've heard that.

And yet I find stepping over the top tube so much easier than trying to get my leg WAY up over a saddle.
Don't leave your pump right next to the bike. When you stand it can tip over and into the spokes of your rear wheel. I lost four spokes that way.

Once the weather gets too cold to ride on a regular basis, I start showing up at the local yoga class. It's amazing how tight my hammies get over the summer. Of course, intervals are the worst and 2/3's of my riding is a commute consisting of a dozen intervals spaced 6-8 blocks apart.

Also, I've slowly started doing cyclocross remounts most every time. It attracts quite a bit of notice.
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