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Thread: backpack

  1. #1
    Member capkos's Avatar
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    backpack

    I'm considering purchasing a backpack for water. There are so many on the market as to make this decision difficult. I'd like to buy just one (the right one). Any suggestions?
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    Every lane is a bike lane Chris L's Avatar
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    If it's in a warm climate, my suggestion is don't bother. A wearing a backpack on a ride of any length will cause you to sweat twice as much (I know) and thus drink twice as much water.
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    The Female Enduro velo's Avatar
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    I agree with Chris L. Unless you're going to be riding some really, really tough trails with a mountain bike, don't bother with a backpack. They're expensive, weigh more, are hard to clean out, don't look too great, and are expensive...

    Work on some bike handling skills and use water bottles is my suggestion.

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    BikeForums Founder Joe Gardner's Avatar
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    I have to disagree, i have a Camelbak HAWG, it holds 100oz of water, enough for most rides. If you put ice in the camelbak, it will keep you cool for hours. The new designs have a ribbed back, to allow air flow, and get rid of any sweat. I hate water bottles when mtn biking, i never drink enough water, and they get too warm too fast.

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    Little Debbie Fiend Club KevinG's Avatar
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    Originally posted by Joe Gardner
    I have to disagree, i have a Camelbak HAWG, it holds 100oz of water, enough for most rides. If you put ice in the camelbak, it will keep you cool for hours. The new designs have a ribbed back, to allow air flow, and get rid of any sweat. I hate water bottles when mtn biking, i never drink enough water, and they get too warm too fast.
    I have to agree with Joe on this one. I have a Camelbak Rocket it is smaller and lighter than most. It holds 72 oz of water, a small pump, a multi tool, tube and food. It rides a little higher on the back than most and is a lot flatter due to a baffled bladder. Camelbaks have come a long way fast. If you ride anywhere that is hot and humid they are a necessity.
    Last edited by KevinG; 01-21-02 at 05:18 PM.
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    Sumanitu taka owaci LittleBigMan's Avatar
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    Originally posted by Joe Gardner
    I have to disagree, i have a Camelbak HAWG, it holds 100oz of water, enough for most rides. If you put ice in the camelbak, it will keep you cool for hours.
    This is true.

    In fact, I am thinking of strapping some freezer packs to my bod come June.



    (...you think I'm joking?)
    No worries

  7. #7
    Senior Member nebill's Avatar
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    When I ride the road bike (50+ miles) I wear my Blackburn hydrapak (110 oz.) and carry two water bottles! Hydration is power! Since I ride solo, I also carry along a folding tire, a spare tube, and a small tool set. All fits nicely in the hydrapak.

    When I ride the mountain bike, even though I only cover 10 to 15 miles, and the temps are usually in the 30s and 40s, I still carry the hydrapak and one oversize water bottle. I will usually go through almost all of the hydrapak, and still have the water bottle for emergencies, and for giving the dogs that come with us a drink.

    Oh, yes, and one other thing, you can really carry a lot of stuff in a hydrapak! Last summer, while on the way home, I was in the mood for a hot dog and a beer...'er...sports drink. I stopped at a convenience store, and emptied the remaining water out of the bladder, and replaced it with some ice. Then, I could fit a six pack of my favorite beverage and the 'dogs in the pak. (I still had my water bottles, of course.) Another half hour and I was home, and the cargo was still nice and cold! Life is good! :-)

    If I were a racer, I would probably not wear a hydrapak, but then I wouldn't probably be riding 80 to 100 miles at a time, either. But, riding unsupported long rides, I would not be without one!
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    Mad For Marinoni !!! Captain Crunch's Avatar
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    I have never used a pack myself other than one I borrowed to try out for hiking and I found it hot there so I don't think I would ever want one for biking.

    Something to remember is that unless you are doing long rides of over 2-3 hours you don't need to take that much water with you. The human body can only absorb about 750-1000 ml (3-4 cups) of water per hour so if you are not going to be out for more than 3 hours two bottles of water should be more than enough. The rest is just extra weight which you will be slugging around on your back making you thirsty but any extra you drink will just be sloshing around in your belly making you uncomfortable.
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    GT enthusiast midwestmntnbkr's Avatar
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    When I mountain bike I have always used a backpack of some sort. The one I own now and have used for about 1 1/2 years is a Camelback Mule. It's great, holds 100 oz. and plenty of room for a tube, co2 inflator, some snacks and a multi tool, with room left over if needed. I currently use water bottles on the road bike, but I am planning on getting a bladder only type of backpack for the coming summer. I have a under seat bag for the necessities, so all I want is water on my back. Camelback makes several nice models to choose from. I would have to suggest a Camelback for a few reasons.
    1. Mine has been envolved in many crashes and incidents with trees with no signs of wear.
    2. I have had some pretty heavy loads in it with no signs of seams tearing.
    3. If it gets real dirty, empty it and throw it in the washer and hang to dry...virtually new again.
    4. I know of many people that use them and I haven't heard any complaints yet.

    Well that's my opinion, for what its worth
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    I'm another one in favour of back pack type hydration systems. I just tend not to drink enough water using only bottles, when I get in the groove on the road I don't like to spoil it by sitting up to drink out of a bottle.

    As others have said, as well, I use it to carry a folding tire, wallet and food when I'm on the road bike.

    I've got one of the smaller ones, but it's adequate, and has the type of bladder that has a large opening so it's easy to fill and clean out.
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  11. #11
    Dances with Rocks Dirtgrinder's Avatar
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    I wouldn't be without one either. Plus being able to carry all your extras in it is really nice. Expecially on a mountain bike. I already lost one frame pump. Now I just keep it in my Camelbak. As far as cleaning it, I just rinse mine out and keep it it my freezer.
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    The one really useful application for a Camelbak [or whatever] is in cold weather, IMO. Around freezing, water bottles freeze below freezing [duh!]. On the other hand, you can wear your camelback underneath your outer layers of clothing; body heat keeps the water liquid on those winter rides [and skiing].
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    Ich bin ein Lowlander! toolfreak's Avatar
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    I think hydration systems are great for cycling and hillwalking, two years ago i bought this really cheap 2l. Platypus for 20 $.
    I like it so much because you can go on and on, without stopping.

    Another point is that it improves your drinking habbit.
    With hydration packs you drink more times a bit water and this is better than wait till you get thirsty and drink lots of water.
    You can disagree with this, but i noticed it during an alpine course in Switserland.

    After three hours of walking on a glacier, it was time for a break.
    I was only hungry, but my friends needed the break really bad because of the water.

    This sounds like the shopping chanel (sorry Chewa ), but i think they are great products and they don`t have to be that expensive!
    Mark







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    Ich bin ein Lowlander! toolfreak's Avatar
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    Sorry Velocipedo, i have to disagree, because in really cold weather the tube and mouthpiece will freeze, i had this a few times myself.
    If someone knows a solution for this problem, please tell me!
    Mark







    Dancevalley 2th of august 2003 -> JXL, Laidback luke, Sasha, John Digweed, Monica Krusse.....and on!

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    Love Me....Love My Bike! aerobat's Avatar
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    Possibly you can keep the mouthpiece tucked into your collar and keep it warm enough to avoid that problem, you just have to keep it from leaking down your shirt (Brrrrr!).

    I'm going out skiing momentarily to test this theory, it's -19 deg C. I'll post on the outcome!
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    Little Debbie Fiend Club KevinG's Avatar
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    Originally posted by toolfreak
    Sorry Velocipedo, i have to disagree, because in really cold weather the tube and mouthpiece will freeze, i had this a few times myself.
    If someone knows a solution for this problem, please tell me!
    Camelbak sells a kit that insulates the mouthpiece and tube.
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  17. #17
    Love Me....Love My Bike! aerobat's Avatar
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    Well, just came in from the great experiment, and back to the drawing board! I had the backpack and tube inside my windproof, but outside my fleece and the tube froze up in 10 minutes. I put everything under the fleec and an hour and a half later it was still frozen.

    Conclusion: Don't let it freeze up in the first place, it takes a lot to thaw it out! Next time I'll try putting it under my fleece in the first place. BTW, even though the tube and mouthpiece didn't thaw, I was sweating!

    ... to be continued.

    PS Just saw KevinG's post, I'll have to get me one of those!
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    Mad For Marinoni !!! Captain Crunch's Avatar
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    I have heard of people using copper piping insulation, that plumbers use, around the hose to their hydration packs to keep them from freezing. I'm sure it is cheaper than what Camelback is going to sell you.
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    BikeForums Founder Joe Gardner's Avatar
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    I think i paid $5 for my neoprene sleve to cover the tube, works well for winter riding. Another tip is to blow into the tube after you take a drink.

  20. #20
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    I go with what Joe said, a quick blow in your tube to clear the water in it, usually solves the problem of freezing. I also have one of the "thermal kits" that camelback sells and it works pretty good at keeping it thawed, but in severe temps it is going to freeze. Not hardly anything to do about it. Before I bought my thermal kit, I used a piece of bar tape and wrapped it around the tube. It helped but not as good as the "real" thing that was made for it.
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    Senior Member ahuman's Avatar
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    I love having water when I need it.
    I use the camelpac mule has plenty of room for stuff
    on chilly days I can stuff a lite jacket in it .
    on hot days I can cool my face and my riding partner and still have plenty of water. during the winter and summer I blow the water out of the tube. there is a kit that keeps it cool in the summer and helps keep it from turning into ice during the winter
    NEVER wait until you are thirsty to drink.
    with the hydropac (sp) I can fill a water bottle with a power drink
    (yuck) and cut it with water in my mouth. and the mouth piece
    is always close to my mouth (I can take a drink with out taking my hands off the bar.


    K

  22. #22
    Senior Member stever's Avatar
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    re the debate about backpacks

    i also now a big fan of the camelback system

    i bought a cameback hawg a few years ago

    3litres of liquids is great plus you tend to drink more on the go

    ive found you drink little and often which is better for hydration
    rather than with waterbottles which i found was that i took a swig when i was really thirsty

    the advantage also of the cameback system is that it is just the right size ....ie on a summer day on the tandem 3 litres and a coupla bananas and a waterproof jkt i live in scotland so you can never be to careful...

    re using the cameback in winter conditions and probs with icing up

    you can get a
    cover for the tube and mouthpiece this also keeps the water cool in the tube in the summer

    ice cubes in the camelback are also a good idea

    i hope this info is helpful
    and no i dont work for cameback lol

  23. #23
    Ich bin ein Lowlander! toolfreak's Avatar
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    Good tips, i like the idea off creating my own insulation, i`ll check my work tommorow to see if i can get insulation foam for free!

    :thumbup:
    Mark







    Dancevalley 2th of august 2003 -> JXL, Laidback luke, Sasha, John Digweed, Monica Krusse.....and on!

  24. #24
    Chi-Chi Monger *WildHare*'s Avatar
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    Another vote for Camelbak. I have a Blowfish for the bike and a Peakbagger for the day hikes. Having somewhere to put all your goodies is a must. If your going for a quick spin, a water bottle is the ticket, but for the long rides/hikes a pack is the best...
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  25. #25
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    I can see they are good for off road use. Waterbottles can pick up lots of dirt, esp the kind without a flip lid. Backpacks are also good protection if you come off the bike, as long are there are no sharp tools there.
    In the old days, riders used to mount thier bidons on the bars. Ive seen triathalon setups with bottles between aerobars, and straws, so you can drink on the move.
    You can also use metal vacume flasks to keep things warm, but you can't drink it on the move.

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