Cycling and bicycle discussion forums. 
   Click here to join our community Log in to access your Control Panel  


Go Back   > >

General Cycling Discussion Have a cycling related question or comment that doesn't fit in one of the other specialty forums? Drop on in and post in here! When possible, please select the forum above that most fits your post!

User Tag List

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Old 06-09-09, 08:42 AM   #1
V-rex
Junior Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Aug 2005
Location: Frankfort, Ky.
Bikes:
Posts: 20
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Bicycle Load Capacity

Looking at my new Giant FCR-1 which has a rather delicate look with its widely spoked wheels, it occurred to me to wonder what the actual design load capacity or maximum gross weight of the bike is. This information is provided for all other vehicles I know of -- cars, trucks, motorcycles, of course airplanes -- it's usually on a placard somewhere on the vehicle. It seems odd that this information is not readily available for bicycles, where it's obviously an important consideration in how the bike is used. This has to have been considered in the design process, so why is it not made known to the user? Anyone else ever wonder about this?

Lee
V-rex is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-09-09, 11:45 AM   #2
DieselDan
Senior Member
 
DieselDan's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2003
Location: Beaufort, South Carolina, USA and surrounding islands.
Bikes: Cannondale R500, Motobecane Messenger
Posts: 8,521
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Nope. Over loading a bike rarely cause death and destruction like a car or truck would over loaded.
DieselDan is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-09-09, 01:16 PM   #3
stapfam
Time for a change.
 
stapfam's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2004
Location: 6 miles inland from the coast of Sussex, in the South East of England
Bikes: Dale MT2000. Bianchi FS920 Kona Explosif. Giant TCR C. Boreas Ignis. Pinarello Fp Uno.
Posts: 19,915
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Unless you are talking about a lighweight Alloy or C.F.Frame- The limit on how much you can load onto a bike- is "How heavy does it feel when you pedal it". Tyre loading will be a factor- but if it is that heavy- a slight slope and you will be walking. Then you will find out how heavy an overloaded bike is.

Panniers and racks will have a "Safe" Maximum load that can be put on them- and I suppose a Clydesdale would have a degree of loading aswell. Then there is the Balance problem- Overloaded bikes will not be stable at slow speeds.

Last year I came across a couple of Touring cyclists- They don't do it often but they reckoned they had 100lbs loaded on each bike. One was an old Cannondale and the other a Chromoly framed bike. What they both had in common were very low gears and strong wheels with hubs that felt as though they could do with a service.
__________________
How long was I in the army? Five foot seven.


Spike Milligan
stapfam is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-09-09, 11:54 PM   #4
Rustyoldbikes
Senior Member
 
Join Date: May 2009
Bikes:
Posts: 135
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
The width of a bike's tires are the best clue as to its design limits. A 21mm wide racing tire with an ultra-light racing rim is designed for a rider weighing 120 pounds to 180 pounds. A hybrid with a 35mm tire and a heavy duty rim is designed to handle riders weighing up to 250 pounds or so. A mountain bike with massive tires and heavy duty rims can handle 300 pound riders.

Sadly, bike shops tend to steer everyone with a "fat" wallet to the 16 pound road bikes...even the 300 pound people who simply wanted to ride around the neighborhood to lose some weight.
Rustyoldbikes is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-10-09, 12:34 AM   #5
Wordbiker
Pwnerer
 
Wordbiker's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2005
Location: Pagosa Springs, CO, USA
Bikes: Road, MTB, Cruiser, Chopper, BMX
Posts: 2,907
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rustyoldbikes View Post
The width of a bike's tires are the best clue as to its design limits. A 21mm wide racing tire with an ultra-light racing rim is designed for a rider weighing 120 pounds to 180 pounds. A hybrid with a 35mm tire and a heavy duty rim is designed to handle riders weighing up to 250 pounds or so. A mountain bike with massive tires and heavy duty rims can handle 300 pound riders.

Sadly, bike shops tend to steer everyone with a "fat" wallet to the 16 pound road bikes...even the 300 pound people who simply wanted to ride around the neighborhood to lose some weight.
Try steering someone with a weight issue away from the lightweight bikes sometime and you'll see the real issue.
__________________
Quote:
Originally Posted by ahsposo View Post
Ski, bike and wish I was gay.
Wordbiker is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-10-09, 06:44 AM   #6
DieselDan
Senior Member
 
DieselDan's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2003
Location: Beaufort, South Carolina, USA and surrounding islands.
Bikes: Cannondale R500, Motobecane Messenger
Posts: 8,521
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rustyoldbikes View Post
The width of a bike's tires are the best clue as to its design limits. A 21mm wide racing tire with an ultra-light racing rim is designed for a rider weighing 120 pounds to 180 pounds. A hybrid with a 35mm tire and a heavy duty rim is designed to handle riders weighing up to 250 pounds or so. A mountain bike with massive tires and heavy duty rims can handle 300 pound riders.

Sadly, bike shops tend to steer everyone with a "fat" wallet to the 16 pound road bikes...even the 300 pound people who simply wanted to ride around the neighborhood to lose some weight.
Wow. What a load of garbage post. Tires don't dictate weight capacity, wheel build does. I ride a road bike with 32 and 36 spoke wheels at 275 with no problems whatsoever, but my wheels were professionally built by a master wheelsmith.

Good bike shops don't practice that kind of sales tactic. You're just used to buying cars too much on credit.
DieselDan is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-10-09, 11:02 PM   #7
CrimsonEclipse
Registered User
 
Join Date: Dec 2004
Bikes:
Posts: 508
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by DieselDan View Post
Wow. What a load of garbage post. Tires don't dictate weight capacity, wheel build does. I ride a road bike with 32 and 36 spoke wheels at 275 with no problems whatsoever, but my wheels were professionally built by a master wheelsmith.

Good bike shops don't practice that kind of sales tactic. You're just used to buying cars too much on credit.
Tires are also a limiting factor.
the Schwalbe has the weight limit of each tire type and size combination.

CE
CrimsonEclipse is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-11-09, 07:12 PM   #8
DieselDan
Senior Member
 
DieselDan's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2003
Location: Beaufort, South Carolina, USA and surrounding islands.
Bikes: Cannondale R500, Motobecane Messenger
Posts: 8,521
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by CrimsonEclipse View Post
Tires are also a limiting factor.
the Schwalbe has the weight limit of each tire type and size combination.

CE
Tire weight limit is meaningless if the wheels are crap.
DieselDan is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-11-09, 09:45 PM   #9
CrimsonEclipse
Registered User
 
Join Date: Dec 2004
Bikes:
Posts: 508
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by DieselDan View Post
Tire weight limit is meaningless if the wheels are crap.
Same with the tires....

CE
CrimsonEclipse is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-11-09, 10:17 PM   #10
Juggler2
W A N T E D
 
Juggler2's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2006
Bikes:
Posts: 496
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
But what if the load is actual "crap"?
Juggler2 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-12-09, 08:40 AM   #11
xtrajack
xtrajack
 
xtrajack's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2008
Location: Maine
Bikes: Kona fire mountain/xtracycle,Univega landrover fs,Nishiki custom sport Ross professional super gran tour Schwinn Mesa (future Xtracycle donor bike)
Posts: 2,058
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Not ever having taken physics in high school,(All I wanted was out,big mistake) I would think that the determining factor for the load limit of a bike would be the wheels. I am not sure how/where the frame materials and or design would would factor in.

A chain is only as strong as it's weakest link. (I think I heard that somewhere,makes sense to me)
I have seen ads for the Yuba Mundo saying they had a load capacity in the neighborhood of 400 pounds. Way more weight than I would want to pedal down the road---coming from someone whose bicycle weighs in at approx. 112 pounds.

I personally have hauled close to a hundred pounds on my bike
xtrajack is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off



All times are GMT -6. The time now is 03:56 PM.